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  • What make is this Plow?

    I bought an old plow this past weekend. Can someone tell me what make it is? I have yet to find one like it on the internet. How old is it? I think 40s or 50s?

    Also, if you have experience with it, how to adjust it. I am having difficulty getting both blades to cut evenly. What role is the rubber roller wheel supposed to play? Depth control for the front, back, both or not at all? I am also having trouble keeping my smallish tractor straight (kubota L4400 45hp 4X4 with frontend loader). I think I need to replace the load spring on the back that keeps an idler wheel pushed into the dirt to try and stabilize the tractor…I think.

    There are two scrapers missing off the big blades. I may have to make those.

    The good news is, I broke it right off and had an opportunity to weld!
    Last edited by T>D>C; 03-21-2008, 09:24 AM.
    T>D>C

    Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

    Hobart Handler 175
    Welding with 0.030 solid wire

    You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

  • #2
    Name that plow?

    Couple more pics.
    T>D>C

    Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

    Hobart Handler 175
    Welding with 0.030 solid wire

    You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

    Comment


    • #3
      Not sure of the make, but that is a 'disc' plow.

      disc plow

      The link is to a currently made version.

      I would suspect that the reason you are having trouble is simply adjustment to set things up for your tractor, and the first furrow is the hardest to get going to boot. The plow needs to be setup side to side in such a way that the right hand tires of the tractor are in the furrow left by the last pass of the plow. There is likely bolts somewhere that are meant to be loosened to slide the plow side to side for that, problem is they are generally set for a tractor and left there for the next 30 years, meaning they are generally seized/rusted solid by now.

      The rearmost wheel, looks to be on about a 45 degree angle, should match up with the edge of the furrow and keep the plow from pulling to the left. Set up properly, a plow should almost track itself straight in a line, there should be no side pull at all on the tractor.

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      • #4
        It's pretty hard to say without looking closely at the castings for identification. Looking at it, my gut tells me probably late '50s. Also, because 3 point wasn't as common in the 50's, and the fact that its a two bottom plow, my guess would have to be Ford. Of course, these are all educated guesses.

        Nick
        Last edited by FarmallMan; 03-19-2008, 10:17 AM.

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        • #5
          I cannot find an identifying mark on the casting other than what looks like a serial number.

          Thanks for the replies.
          T>D>C

          Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

          Hobart Handler 175
          Welding with 0.030 solid wire

          You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

          Comment


          • #6
            Doesn't look right to be a Dearborn (or Ford) plow. With some more googling, I came up with Dearborn plows as models 10-80/202 and the 10-203/204. (One thing I notice is the a-frame uprights are narrower than the Ford/dearborn plows usually are.

            However, if you go to New Holland Parts and type in the model numbers I listed, you can compare yourself. Maybe some of the casting numbers will match up, can't help you there.

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            • #7
              good lookin find i love to look for old equipment would be a fun re-fab job. i sent the pics you put on here to my uncle has been farming since the 40's to see if he knows what kind it is and if he knows how to adjust it. cool lookin plow though
              USMC GRUNT

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              • #8
                I thought it was a Dearborn as well but I have not found a picture of one to match the weight in the middle. Most Dearborns I found have a square weight and this one is contoured.

                Thanks for your help.
                T>D>C

                Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

                Hobart Handler 175
                Welding with 0.030 solid wire

                You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

                Comment


                • #9
                  The other common 3pth equipment of that era was Massey, a majority of it is one or the other, but there were some other manufacturers too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Was Ferguson in the fray as well? I know they imported tractors when they had the falling out with Ford, but donno how many implements also were imported.

                    I could be completely wrong on the date. IH didn't get on board with 3 points until the '60s. Before that it was a 2-point Fast Hitch. I think Case had their own flavor, as did Deere.

                    What are the bolt heads like? Hex or Square?

                    Nick

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                    • #11
                      Bolt heads are hex.
                      T>D>C

                      Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

                      Hobart Handler 175
                      Welding with 0.030 solid wire

                      You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Getting closer. Found a stampled IH on a couple places. Found an old single point on line that looks a lot like it.
                        T>D>C

                        Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

                        Hobart Handler 175
                        Welding with 0.030 solid wire

                        You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My copy of 150 Years of International Harvestor is at work, but I'll take a look though it on Monday. If you've got a main part stamped IH, then that's what it is for sure. Hopefully I'll be able to get you a model number from the book. If you've got a Tractor Supply Co store near you, they might have a copy in the books section. With hex bolts, it was probably early 60's or later. IH had a 2 point system that they sold through most of the '50s, IIRC.

                          Nick

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                          • #14
                            Took a closer look tonight with a flash light.

                            Weight in the middle stamped 658 ?08 (hard to read – last 3 numbers may be engraved) IH(I in the middle of the H) then some more numbers or letters or symbols. Red paint is covering up some of the last letter/symbols. I can also see some red paint on the inside of the weight/casting that makes up the frame. The 1st number I am calling a 6 may be an 8.

                            1st saw one of the IH stamps on one of the heavy metal arms that holds the disc.

                            Thanks for everyone’s help.
                            T>D>C

                            Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

                            Hobart Handler 175
                            Welding with 0.030 solid wire

                            You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I finally figured out how to dial in the old International Harvester plow. I had to extend the bar that connects the tractors linking bar to the back of the disc. This put pressure on the back of the plow and straightened the tractor out. My L4400 is a little short. The back of the plow will not clear the groud at max lift but it cut beautifully. My tractor does not have automatic draft control so I had to control the lift manually to maximize depth of cut.

                              When plowing a field, you travel counter clock wise to allow the right tractor tire to run in the last cut. What do you do when the two rows meet in the middle leaving a large ditch. Just fill it back in with the disc?

                              The L4400 did pretty well. Ran it in L3 at 2,200 rpms. Lift depth 5-6 (scale 1-10) most of the time.

                              Thanks for your help.

                              T>D>C
                              T>D>C

                              Danesdigital.zenfolio.com

                              Hobart Handler 175
                              Welding with 0.030 solid wire

                              You know what they say, "The early worm gets eaten by the bird".

                              Comment

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