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  • Pump stands

    Recently, a couple guys here have commented that too many people are reading and not posting. I have to admit, I have been one of those not posting. A couple months ago, I cleaned out my camera, found these pictures.

    I built 5 of these pump stands, all were fabricated off-site (at the ranch headquarters) and transported/installed afterwards. Click image for larger version

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    Currently up to my ears with excavator buckets, both wear strips and floors. I will get pictures next week if I can ......
    *** Disclaimer ***

    As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

  • #2
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    *** Disclaimer ***

    As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice economical design, and built to last! Would like to see bucket pictures.

      Comment


      • #4
        Man this is great! A real professional looking job.
        And a look into things completely different than life here.
        We have nothing even remotely like that here.

        Got lake Michingan, plenty 'O rain, and the worst
        summertime humidity outside of the Amazon.
        sigpicViceGrip
        Negative people have a problem for every solution

        Comment


        • #5
          Normally, I try to take pictures in progress, so I can explain what I am doing as the job goes along. It is possible that I have pictures of this job on my old computer, which I haven't been able to start up since 2011, those pictures will have to wait until I find some 14 year old kid much more computer savvy than I to fix it.

          Once I had the material cut, laid out the first stand (there were 4 identical). Since this was on the ground, we not only squared but also leveled, shimming up where necessary. Tacked, then welded everything I could get to from the top side. Built the next three on top, one after the other.

          Then removed each one. Pipe pilings were ordered cut to length, cheaper and faster having the supplier cut. Also had a local shop cut me the proper size discs to cap the tops with. I welded the discs in each piling beforehand, as I flipped each frame over I completed welding from the bottom side, and then welded the pilings on, standing them up.

          Before doing the last one, I tacked short stubs onto the last frame, slotted the upright pipes into them, and built all the handrails. I just laid out and tacked these, customer wanted his guys to get welding experience, they welded and ground. Capped uprights with "punchies", from a customer/supplier with an ironworker.

          The one double-pump frame, I simply laid out, leveled, and welded by itself.

          Installing, the excavator operator simply dug four holes for each one in the ditch (six for the double pump), then placed the stand in, tapping each corner until level. Very important to have pumps level and plumb, otherwise you wear bearings and bushings out too fast. Once everything was ok, called in the cement trucks, dumped a load underneath each stand to fill around the pilings and underneath each pump.

          After these were all set I then measured and pre-fabbed the access walkways. I didn't worry about angles, I simply hinged them with a single tab each side with a single bolt on each side. That way, if the levee settles, or the ramp sinks into the dirt, won't pull the stand off plumb. We then hand-carried each pre-fabbed stand handrail into place, welded down, and then installed grating and pumps. Handrail for ramps was installed in place.

          All the pumps, except one, are on the supply line directly from the Sacramento River. The last pump is in a sump, at the bottom of the fields, pumps the excess water back up to where it can be re-used.

          Edit: as this is yellow jacket country, every piling and every handrail was capped.
          This whole project was a big difference from my normal experience with pumpstands, just a bunch of RR ties and telephone posts tied together, with a simple plank you had to walk across with a 5 gallon bucket of turbine oil to lube the pump.
          Last edited by calweld; 03-25-2014, 03:27 PM.
          *** Disclaimer ***

          As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

          Comment


          • #6
            Excellent explanation, and is a great substitute for pictures in progress!

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice looking work Joe. Finest point in my childhood was when my dad sold off all our irrigated land, kept the dry land and went into the elevator/warehouse/packaging business. Might have had to load two semi trailers with 100 lb. bags of beans/popcorn/birdseed a night after school and a railcar on the weekend, but it was preferable to doing irrigation!
              Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

              Comment


              • #8
                Roy!!!! Glad to hear from you!! You popped in a couple weeks ago, sounded like you were going back to the stone ages. I did a google search for you, did you know you can actually start fire by rubbing two sticks together? I gotta look this up again, there is no reason for you to freeze to death simply because you are now living out in the boondocks. No interweb? No problem, even coyotes are useable!!!!! (see picture!) Found a couple websites full of handy tips for guys like you.

                Gotta admit, though, I agree with you about the irrigation thing. I'm ok with riding around on a 4-wheeler using a valve-iron,,,, and fixing siphon pipes, but actually using siphons, let somebody else do it.

                edit: 003 is the one I was referring to, but since 002 is good also, I'm leaving it up ......
                Attached Files
                Last edited by calweld; 03-25-2014, 09:33 PM.
                *** Disclaimer ***

                As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Joe, we may be able to get some form of Internet service. The site tech they sent out gave me a 90% on a small tower, but it won't be much faster than dial-up. Figure I can haul my arse down to MickeyD's for free wifi if need be. No Stone Age...only 9 miles to the Rapid City Mall and if we were on the other side of the hill we would be served by excellent providers...just not here anytime soon. Besides, no to very little Internet means more time to play with my tools...once we get them moved over here.
                  Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Last weekend was a three~day for me.
                    Did nothing but R&R (rest & reflect).
                    Was that a mistake!

                    I have to keep moving for the remainder of my journey..........
                    ...... or the journey is gonna become significantly shorter.

                    Less net can be a good thing.
                    sigpicViceGrip
                    Negative people have a problem for every solution

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wyoming View Post
                      Joe, we may be able to get some form of Internet service. The site tech they sent out gave me a 90% on a small tower, but it won't be much faster than dial-up. Figure I can haul my arse down to MickeyD's for free wifi if need be. No Stone Age...only 9 miles to the Rapid City Mall and if we were on the other side of the hill we would be served by excellent providers...just not here anytime soon. Besides, no to very little Internet means more time to play with my tools...once we get them moved over here.
                      You can always try banging rocks together, maybe your message will get relayed on. Probably slower than dialup.

                      Hey!!! I found the search I did a couple weeks ago for you!!! Lots of handy tips!!!! Next time you are at the coffee shop with free wi-fi, download this, it is better than starting over like the cave-men did. Here's the link: http://www.bing.com/search?q=backwoo...PC=HPDTDF&QS=n

                      I also remember something from back when I was a kid, you can punch a hole in a couple tin cans and run a string between them, if you have a good neighbor with internet, this may be an option also .....

                      *** Disclaimer ***

                      As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Joe, your kindness knows no bounds. Internet shouldn't be problematic once we get fully moved in over in the hills. At present it isn't anything other than a distraction...truth be told, about what it always has been. Still, it would be nice to get back to paying bills on-line and being able to order supplies into the backwoods. As remote as the new place is, there is still a paved road to the front of the property and a short half block drive off the dirt road off the paved hiway...first right hand turn about a block in. The short drive was a buying consideration for us as winter snows can be fierce! I-90 is four miles as the crow flies and Rapid City, the regional shopping/medical hub, is just 6-7 miles away. Fact of the matter, you have to take the first Rapid City exit to get to the paved road out in front of the house. Much nicer than driving the 141 miles from Gillette to Rapid City...especially when twilight and the deer come out to play bumper cars.

                        As to fire starting...two fireplaces, gas in the basement and wood upstairs in the living room. Propane heat with electrical back-up. Truth be known Joe...you may be further out there in the boonies than what we are. All I can say for sure is that the area is quiet and peaceful...well until Sturgis Bike Week hits anyway...and I don't need to drive down to my shop and open a locked gate anymore. The main shop is slightly larger than my old shop and the second shop will store the remainder of our toys securely. Downside is I need to build an insulated machine room for the machine tools, drywall and insulate the rest of the shop and take one of the radiant gas heaters down from the old shop and re-install that after swapping in propane jets. So...don't be letting yourself grieve for our sorry plight Joe.
                        Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          good looking work Joe!

                          I wondered what you had been up to. I have helped finish a 28' foot and 42' gate. Tacking up two 20' today and Monday. Then we start on the 48 footers. I do not powder coat them. By the time I looked at that many pickets I would be cross-eyed. Still maintaining 4" picket spacing.
                          fence and gate shop worker
                          At home...
                          Lincoln Power MIG 180....
                          Winco 6000 watt generator (13 hp Honda) "Big Jake"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Pump stands

                            Hi,

                            As above the pump seems to have got stuck so it is not possible to undo the two halfs to clean the impellor.

                            Any ideas?

                            Thanks.

                            Stef
                            Vale la pena encontrar mas informacion sobre alternativas de sildenafilo, asi como algunos datos sobre Xenical y sus reacciones adversas.

                            Comment

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