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Outdoor Wood Stove - Just an idea

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  • #46
    Re~read my post, not just key words,
    Heated liguid and heated gasses rise.
    Heat in solids travels in all directions at the same speed.

    If you used an O/A torch in zero gravity, you would staturate the entire
    area around the torch with heat and have to shut it down.

    Heat travels from where it is, to where it aint.
    It's speed is relative to the temporature~differential of where it is, to where it aint.
    Last edited by vicegrip; 09-28-2014, 01:23 AM.
    sigpicViceGrip
    Negative people have a problem for every solution

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    • #47
      Technically heat is the transfer of thermal energy. When you heat something, the energy and vibration of the thing's molecules increase. In the case of liquids and gases, they also become lighter, hence the rise. As Phil points out, a solid has it's molecules fixed in place, so the heat spreads evenly. If you apply Fireman's torch to a vertical piece of metal, you'll see the red hot area spread evenly around the point of the flame. (And I wouldn't touch it underneath the flame like holding your hand under the flame in air!)
      Blacksmith
      Stickmate LX AC/DC
      Big cheap (Chinese) Anvil
      Hand cranked coal forge
      Freon bottle propane forge
      HH 210 and bottle of C25

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Blacksmith View Post
        Technically heat is the transfer of thermal energy. When you heat something, the energy and vibration of the thing's molecules increase. In the case of liquids and gases, they also become lighter, hence the rise. As Phil points out, a solid has it's molecules fixed in place, so the heat spreads evenly. If you apply Fireman's torch to a vertical piece of metal, you'll see the red hot area spread evenly around the point of the flame. (And I wouldn't touch it underneath the flame like holding your hand under the flame in air!)
        And that's conduction, but if you continue to the melting point you'll see convection. Fireman is talking about convection, and radiation, and no one is talking about molecular diffusion, and heat transfer in plasma. Good topic for another thread involving the way things burn in space.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Blacksmith View Post
          When those systems worked right, they provided a constant low heat, kind of like the sun does; very comfortable.
          And I still yearn for the times when you had to pee in the toilet to melt the ice, and water froze in my bedroom...

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          • #50
            charley-bob, was your existing house-heating system also forced air? And did the two systems work independently, so that you could choose which to use? For example, in an extended cold period, fire up the wood, system, but just let the previous main system do the job when it was cool for a day... Did the wood forced-air use the previous ducting system? Any provision for outside air intake on either system?

            If you don't want to bother with these questions, feel free to say so. My friend is quite happy with the info so far, and is already lining up material to do something similar.

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            • #51
              It is said that if you heat fresh air and force it into the house continueally,
              with no recirculation, you may cause condensation in the shell of the dwelling
              where the air (now with elevated humidity) is driven out, thru the cold
              materials the shell is made of.

              Yeah or Neih, it makes sence, but to what degree I have no idea.
              Oh, North Welder, how do rate my post today?
              sigpicViceGrip
              Negative people have a problem for every solution

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                And I still yearn for the times when you had to pee in the toilet to melt the ice, and water froze in my bedroom...
                A lot of us are getting soft. I like a cold house.

                These days pouring a bucket of ice water on your head is look at as some new age sort of extreme.

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                • #53
                  Northweldor, to answer your question, the original furnace in my house was an old forced air propane furnace. I was lucky enough to have existing ductwork, and all I did was tie my 8"x12" heat outlet into my existing ductwork. The inlet on my stove (cold air return) runs into the wall of my house (lower level) directly below my heat outlet. It might be hard to tell but if you look at my pictures you can see it. If the stove used outside air it would be very inefficient and I imagine it would cause other problems as well. I fill the stove once a day on the coldest days, and on days above 20 degrees I can get away with ever other day. This is with premium firewood. I also burned a butt-load of junk wood and when burning that I would have to fill it twice a day at times. A 30"x48" burn chamber will hold a lot of wood. The crappier the wood the more the ashes. I tend to let the ashes build up big-time thus reducing the capacity. Last winter I cleaned the ashes out 3 times. I just use a regular shovel and shovel it into my skid-loader bucket. I am very happy with the way this stove works.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by charlie-bob View Post
                    Northweldor, to answer your question, the original furnace in my house was an old forced air propane furnace. I was lucky enough to have existing ductwork, and all I did was tie my 8"x12" heat outlet into my existing ductwork. The inlet on my stove (cold air return) runs into the wall of my house (lower level) directly below my heat outlet. It might be hard to tell but if you look at my pictures you can see it. If the stove used outside air it would be very inefficient and I imagine it would cause other problems as well. I fill the stove once a day on the coldest days, and on days above 20 degrees I can get away with ever other day. This is with premium firewood. I also burned a butt-load of junk wood and when burning that I would have to fill it twice a day at times. A 30"x48" burn chamber will hold a lot of wood. The crappier the wood the more the ashes. I tend to let the ashes build up big-time thus reducing the capacity. Last winter I cleaned the ashes out 3 times. I just use a regular shovel and shovel it into my skid-loader bucket. I am very happy with the way this stove works.
                    Thanks for your trouble and that's really all he needs to know, since he was also planning to hook his cold air return directly to the existing duct system.

                    My question about cold air intake really was about the house, rather than the outdoor stove. In our area, and further north, people are always renovating and insulating to make their house as air-tight as possible, and at the same time installing range-hoods, bathroom exhausts, fireplaces, gas water heaters and dryers that are not direct-vent, etc., and, that use or force air outside. To avoid having a dangerous negative air-pressure in the house and back -drafts, most have a house cold-air intake (which less-tight houses don't need). This is essentially a 6" hole in the basement wall connected to a a trap, or motorized and/or mechanical damper, heat exchanger etc. The purpose is to keep house air pressure neutral or positive. Probably not used in your change, since you are using entirely inside air but does need attention up here, whenever you make changes to your heating system.
                    Last edited by Northweldor; 10-01-2014, 07:46 AM.

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