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  • Outdoor Wood Stove - Just an idea

    Has anybody ever given any thought to building a woodstove and putting it outside, then ducting the air into a building? For example, if you had a shop with a fair amount of sawdust or maybe paint fumes, but wanted to keep it warm, could you build a stove, with a box around it, then blow air into the box and back into the shop? I've read about remote boilers and using radiators to warm a building. Seems moving air to a nearby structure would be easier.

    Dave
    Still building my new old truck - see the progress!
    http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/65...-coe-idea.html
    http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=27017

    Square Wave TIG 200 - Woot!
    MM180
    SP125+

  • #2
    Dave, I was thinking about that yesterday. In my case it would just be to heat the garage shop on occasion. As long as you inner box didn't burn through ...

    http://www.airstove.com/Forced_Air_Wood_Furnaces.html
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------

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    • #3
      I have a friend that has one. You have to have a boatload of insulation around your duct and a short run. I have a Central boiler and as much as a woodhog as it is I still burn 2/3 of the wood he does. It is not that much more work building a water fed system to be worth it for me. The other plus is the domestic hot water. It would be very hard to heat your water with forced air. The other plus to water is you can heat your garage, hot tub,greenhouse or swimming pool fairly easy.
      O/A
      DialArc 250p
      A-O Smith A3000
      Lincoln SP 135 w/gas
      And stuff I have lots of stuff.

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      • #4
        Well, how 'bout that! The only thing I've turned up in my searches was the boiler-types. I guess I wasn't searching for forced air. That's exactly what I'm thinking.

        Laker, I'm not interested in heating the water in the house or even the house itself. I have a gas furnace and water heater that do those jobs sufficiently. I'm only needing to heat the shop on occasion. A boiler also requires a radiator in the workspace, which isn't a "big" deal, but it is a consideration. My understanding is that overall, a boiler is a much more complex setup than just a box with air blowing through it. If I'm wrong, I'd be glad to listen. In fact if a boiler isn't much more complex, it would be easier to run a couple of copper lines through a wall than a duct. IOW, I'm listening.

        Dave
        Still building my new old truck - see the progress!
        http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/65...-coe-idea.html
        http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=27017

        Square Wave TIG 200 - Woot!
        MM180
        SP125+

        Comment


        • #5
          I wonder if it has something to do with the heat transfer as to why you don't see them.

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          • #6
            Air is a poor conductor of heat. You need a fan to move air and a pump to move water. Duct to move air pex to move water. You do need a radiator for water that you do not with air. You need some way to regulate temps with either one. Central has a solenoid to open and close the damper in the door, air would shut off the fan. If you go with air the unit has to be close to the structure to be efficient, you can place a boiler 100'-150' away depending on the Pex you use. Either could be done but water has some major advantages for me. Also check on insurance, with air the duct is a way for fire to enter the shop that cannot happen with water.
            O/A
            DialArc 250p
            A-O Smith A3000
            Lincoln SP 135 w/gas
            And stuff I have lots of stuff.

            Comment


            • #7
              If despite all that the others have said re air vs water for outdoor heat you still want to do it with Forced air, without reinventing the wheel you might want to either purchase or imitate what US Stove has done here:

              https://www.usstove.com/index.php?ro...product_id=487

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              • #8
                I know its an old Thread, BUT!

                A guy had a Wood Boiler to heat his house, etc. In his shop he had 2 vintage(early) Cast Iron MACK truck radiators with box fans behind them! Painted up on nice stands, looked awesome! Someday I would like to do that if they ever invent a decent operating wood boiler that doesn't eat wood and stink up the neighborhood.

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                • #9
                  I've thought of this quite a bit, usually in the midst of our Midwestern winters, but my shop is in the basement, so it would be a pretty long run or else the stove would be in a weird/inconvenient place outside.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by whateg0 View Post
                    Has anybody ever given any thought to building a woodstove and putting it outside, then ducting the air into a building? For example, if you had a shop with a fair amount of sawdust or maybe paint fumes, but wanted to keep it warm, could you build a stove, with a box around it, then blow air into the box and back into the shop? I've read about remote boilers and using radiators to warm a building. Seems moving air to a nearby structure would be easier.

                    Dave
                    Dave, I just joined this forum tonight, and yes I built a forced air outdoor wood burner 2 years ago and last winter it supplied 100% of our heat and our house was nice and cozy and we live in a very cold area! It's bedtime for me but I will explain what I built later if anyone is interested. -CB

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by charlie-bob View Post
                      Dave, I just joined this forum tonight, and yes I built a forced air outdoor wood burner 2 years ago and last winter it supplied 100% of our heat and our house was nice and cozy and we live in a very cold area! It's bedtime for me but I will explain what I built later if anyone is interested. -CB
                      Many would be interested.

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                      • #12
                        I have done this a couple of ways and if I had to do it again would consider some close copy work vs seat of the pants engineering. I like the idea but its imperative to follow some of the UL requirements. There are some conditions where it can overheat, its a real problem, I back engineered a lot and still not very happy with it.
                        Its different than a free standing stove especially once you start insulating it all and even harder than common add a furnace.
                        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                        • #13
                          I based mine off a unit I had gotten from a friend that was well used and had a rather small burn chamber. I used it for 3 winters and the firebox eventually got too thin and I didn't trust it anymore. The new one is much bigger and thicker. My burn chamber is 30" diameter and 48" long. It is a 3\8" wall. The outer jacket is a 1000 gallon propane tank. My door is 5\8" thick and is round. I have a very small squirrel cage fan that is the draft inducer and is hooked into my thermostat in the house. It is also on a limit switch for safety. The inlet (cold air return) is 8" x 14" and the outlet is 8" x 12" and tied into my houses ductwork. My exhaust is thickwall 6" well casing. I'll post some pictures when I get home sometime this weekend. It was a fun and very useful project!

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                          • #14
                            Looking foreward to your pics, sounds pretty good!
                            sigpicViceGrip
                            Negative people have a problem for every solution

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                            • #15
                              Here goes going to try to post a picture

                              Click image for larger version

Name:	start of outdoor woodburner 022.jpg
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ID:	665962Click image for larger version

Name:	start of outdoor woodburner 022.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	41.2 KB
ID:	665962

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