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Hydraulic Cylinder Repair

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  • Hydraulic Cylinder Repair

    My brother-in-law has a log splitter that is seeping fluid. We think we know where it's leaking, but I'm kind of stumped on the proper way to fix it.

    It's down near the original weld where the end is welded on the tube. It's like there was some porosity from the original weld or the cylinder has developed a hairline crack somewhere.

    I've ground it out some, but don't want to thin the wall out too much. Anyone have any advice/suggestions?
    As Iron Sharpens Iron,
    So One Man Sharpens Another.

    Proverbs 27:17

  • #2
    to do it properly do this

    tear it apart. clean the tube grind or lathe cut out the olde weld to clean metal, if grinding you can try to get to the ends of the cracks, but due to
    the nature of that weld joint it technically has a root crack the full circumference. weld with 7018 and peen

    preheating and cleaning with a good brake cleaner several times to get as much oil out of the joint as possible.



    the way that is quickest and likely to work just fine

    clean off the paint extend the rod fully
    drain the oil

    grind and heat the area lightly you will see the oil come out of th crack
    keep light heating and cleaning with brake cleaner unilt you stop getting oil
    or as long has you have patience to do it

    good hot root pass with 6011
    cap with 7018 after grinding back @ half of the root bead to check for
    porosity.

    you can skip the 6011 root if you can tig the root.

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't understand.

      Do you mean grind through the weld and all the way through the cylinder so I can run another root pass? Or do you mean torch the end cap off, grind off all the weld, bevel the two pieces, and re-weld it all from scratch?

      Thanks for your help with this.

      rvb
      As Iron Sharpens Iron,
      So One Man Sharpens Another.

      Proverbs 27:17

      Comment


      • #4
        post a picture of the cylinder for me and i can make sure i am telling you correctly.


        most of those cylinder have a backing or end plate that has a diameter that fits the id of the tube and extends into the cylinder @ 1/4". this helps with the welding , but mostly is a production thing that keeps any weld through from seeing the bore.

        we would set the tube up in the lathe and vee out the weld, sometimes evern cutting it clean through. it is important to get all of the contaminated material out of the way. but yes you want to grind at least the depth of the tube thickness so that your weld is a full penetration.

        fighting the oil is a pain..............

        protip: if it just a pinhole instead of a crack try peening the pinhole with a good ball peen hammer to see if you can close it up

        Comment


        • #5
          Certanium makes a rod that will weld through oil...it's amazing, and expensive, but it will get the job done. Certanium is marketed by Cronatron, now. The Certanium 705 or 707 is what you want.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by chenry View Post
            post a picture of the cylinder for me and i can make sure i am telling you correctly.


            most of those cylinder have a backing or end plate that has a diameter that fits the id of the tube and extends into the cylinder @ 1/4". this helps with the welding , but mostly is a production thing that keeps any weld through from seeing the bore.

            we would set the tube up in the lathe and vee out the weld, sometimes evern cutting it clean through. it is important to get all of the contaminated material out of the way. but yes you want to grind at least the depth of the tube thickness so that your weld is a full penetration.

            fighting the oil is a pain..............

            protip: if it just a pinhole instead of a crack try peening the pinhole with a good ball peen hammer to see if you can close it up
            Much more clear now. Thanks! The leak isn't actually coming from the plug or the weld. It's coming from the cylinder wall near the weld (we think). he drained it for me to weld so we're going to put oil back in it, put it back together and run it to see exactly where the problem is.
            As Iron Sharpens Iron,
            So One Man Sharpens Another.

            Proverbs 27:17

            Comment


            • #7
              could using a dye penetration test help here?
              SA-250 Diesel
              ASME Section IX Certified

              Comment


              • #8
                dye penetrant will help you get all off the crack out if it is one. We would have one from time to time that would run the crack as you welded it so we got in the habit of just cutting the end cap loose and rewelding it.

                oil sucking into the weld is the biggest pain in the butt. going to have to look into the certanium rods

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