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  • Genghis Gong

    I have named this one Genghis Gong, due to its large, imposing size (39" x 13" ). Not yet fitted with a clapper, this is right after I flamed it. I may make a stand for this, we'll see. This was a 100 pound propane cylinder. Sounds good with a soft clapper striking down low, at the edge. The "Rivets" are just weld dots. Hanging loop cut from a car coil spring, traiuler hitch ball center. Spacer under ring is a wheel bearing.

    "Good Enough Never Is"

  • #2
    looks great Hotfoot if you make a stand for it maybe you could place one of your birds on a perch under the clapper like a wind catcher give it a little life

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    • #3
      Cool, no 'hot - hotfoot' today with the cutting. Glad it worked ok, and the gong looks great!!

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      • #4
        Another nice one!

        Hotfoot-
        I 'borrowed' your blackening treatment method for a cross the kids and I made for my dog that recently passed. I have pics I'll post when we get the cross in the ground at the 'ol boy's site and the Mrs has a chance to put the flowers in. I notice on this gong you went for a slight black at the base and did a light heating to achieve the yellow / gold for the upper section. Is this accurate? Have you ever stopped at the purple / pink color? Have you noticed color 'layering' when you do multiple heats and coats? I'm wondering if I experienced what you see or if I'm doing something weird......


        ADDED:
        Hey! Happy 200th to me! YEAH ME!!!
        I NEED MORE COWBELL!!!


        'Red' Powcon 300ST (no torch yet)
        (ok, not really a 'Red'... )
        'Blue' Miller 35 (older than me and runs great), Thunderbolt AC arc (ditto)
        'Craftsman' AC arc (who made this originally?)
        O/A x 2 (both smaller than I'd like)
        14" Milwaukee chopper
        20t HF press (crap, but works)
        Buffalo forge w/ blower
        Alot of pumps!

        "All of us know more than any of us."- TexHand

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        • #5
          Hey, Some Creep: Its fun to play with that heat and oil, isn't it!? I sometimes stop at the purple, too. I use various colr paints, usually really thinned out, under the oil to get some of the colors, especially the reds and blacks at the edges....but not always. It kinda just depends on where I'm heading. In this case, this cylinder was already "aged" silver, and I decided to do a black light glaze coat, then a dark red coat at the bottom, which I wiped upwards with a thinner soaked rag. Then oil, then heat! It takes about two days in the Texas sun afterwards to lose enough tackiness to handle much, but I have sprayed them with clear in the past to get rid of that when I needed to...prefer not to use the clear, though, because it breaks down in the sun. I'll probably paint a thin, ragged , bright red line around this one near the bottom. I've done that before, and rather like it!

          I tell people who get my oil coated items for outdoor use to hit 'em with a coat of Linseed Oil once every spring...just glob it on with a paintbrush. Keeps them very nice.
          "Good Enough Never Is"

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          • #6
            I made the mistake of not flapping the surface before I applied the oil. The weld seam of the square tube I used was visible on the front side (of course, doesn't it always wind up THERE?) thru the lighter shades and forced me to go passed all the fancy colors into the dark range. I got to see them go though! What a sight! Yellow / gold / pink / purple.........wow. I'm going to use this again, trust me. The kids loved using the torch too. I didn't heed your warning about plastic bristles on the brush. Melted a nice layer to the surface.......BUT: in scratching off the plastic that was stuck here and there I found that I was scratching into a gold underlayer and when I recoated it that layer shone (shined? shinnied?) through and gave it a wood-grain appearance! Wow! Really, WOW! It doesn't show in the pictures I have so far but I'll try again to capture what I wound up with.

            You have inspired me. I don't know if that's going to do me well as I'm sure it will run me a fortune in steel, but I will thank you VERY much for now.

            Projects and pictures will follow....

            I NEED MORE COWBELL!!!


            'Red' Powcon 300ST (no torch yet)
            (ok, not really a 'Red'... )
            'Blue' Miller 35 (older than me and runs great), Thunderbolt AC arc (ditto)
            'Craftsman' AC arc (who made this originally?)
            O/A x 2 (both smaller than I'd like)
            14" Milwaukee chopper
            20t HF press (crap, but works)
            Buffalo forge w/ blower
            Alot of pumps!

            "All of us know more than any of us."- TexHand

            Comment


            • #7
              Genghis Gong with Tail

              I added a clapper (a 12" length of 8" log), and a Windcatcher. The stand is not part of this, its an unfinished left-over from an earlier one.

              "Good Enough Never Is"

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              • #8
                Looks cool .. just finished my "Korean Bagota Bell" sign says 'Jim Young' in Korean (per my korean name stamp) ..
                Jim Young
                www.jimyo.com

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                • #9
                  Nice work, Jim! Did you clear coat that? How does it sound?...What's interesting is I scrapped the red "sail" in the picture above and also went with a disk...a large black one!
                  "Good Enough Never Is"

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                  • #10
                    yep, has about 6 coats of clear coat on it. Sounds great .. tone carries about 15 seconds
                    Jim
                    Jim Young
                    www.jimyo.com

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