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Most cost efficient way to insulate garage door?

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  • Most cost efficient way to insulate garage door?

    Hey guys, got a 16'x7' garage door that needs some insulation. I looked into those kits which would require me to buy two of them. Which would be well over $100. Is there any cheaper alternative that could be done and look halfway decent? Thanks fellas!
    HH 140
    Hobart stickmate ac/dc
    Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
    1950's Craftsman drillpress

  • #2
    Seems like simple foam board would do...it used to be really cheap, but it may have gone way up since I bought some 30 years ago (used to be $3.99 a sheet for 1" thick).
    "Good Enough Never Is"

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    • #3
      Foam board is light and cheap good solution. If your welding or grinding close to foam need to shield from hot slag and sparks. Light gage sheet metal cover should solve fire problem otherwise just paint it.
      Last edited by Roger; 02-05-2009, 11:21 AM.

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      • #4
        I went to Home Depot and bought some insulation board--it's white on one side, silver on the other.
        I also bought a roll of silver metal HVAC Duct tape.
        Cut the panels to fit in my garage door segments, taping where needed to hide the seams (the board wasn't long enough), and glued it in with Liquid Nails. I made little wedges of scrap to wedge between the flange on the door segments, and the board to hold it in place while the glue dried. I believe the board I used was near the heating and air condition supplies.

        It hasn't done squat for the winter (because the garage isn't heated), but it made a nice difference in the summer. The single-skin metal doors get direct sunlight from about 2pm until sundown, and would get so hot you could feel the heat radiating off them when you walked by, and couldn't hold your hand on the from inside the shop.

        Now the area by the garage doors is the same temp as the rest of the shop.

        -Brad
        Brad O

        '62 Suburban daily driver
        57 Chevy 150 2-dr station wagon gasser drag car
        56 Chevy 150 2dr Sedan
        54 Buick Special
        '73 Duster project

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        • #5
          Keep in mind that you need to keep it light weight...I used the styrofoam panels with some Liquid Nails, finished it off with a can of the expanding foam.

          Mine turned out great and it didn't cost too much to do.



          Bryan

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          • #6
            I had the exact same issue. The kits were available. It was only a LITTLE cheaper to buy the foam in bulk, cut and install myself, but I was able to use full thickness foam and get better insulation at the same time. Now, the kits are a cleaner look because they have those thin veneer cover panels. I didn't care about that.

            Even that lightweight foam adds up. You MIGHT need to adjust your door springs afterwards. My motor strains more than it used to, so I'm looking at getting that done still.

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            • #7
              Yeah I need something a bit weld proof. I think the bare foam might be dangerous to be weding/grinding by.

              Also I was looking at ditching the door springs that go on each side of the door in favor of the one large spring and bar that go above the door. Any idea what these overhead spring setups cost?
              HH 140
              Hobart stickmate ac/dc
              Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
              1950's Craftsman drillpress

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              • #8
                Scapegoat, If you are looking at both insulation and changing out the spring(s) on your garage door I would recommend that you cut your loses and just call a good garage door company in your area and have them come over and give you an estimate. You'll get whatever style garage door that makes your heart happy with insulation sandwiched between the outer layers and the spring set-up you are looking for at a price that should be about as cheap as doing it yourself. Unless you purchase the overhead spring type that sets the tension by using a drill to wind the spring, you are looking a one vile, ugly and dangerous job of winding that spring's tension...been there and done it.
                Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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                • #9
                  Not sure if I want to spend that kind of money. A new insulated door is $700. Plus the spring kit. I'd be on the higher side of a cool $1000. Just looking to ditch those dangerous springs and insulate my door which is in good shape.
                  HH 140
                  Hobart stickmate ac/dc
                  Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
                  1950's Craftsman drillpress

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                  • #10
                    Advertising, yeah factual but still.........

                    Dale
                    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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                    • #11
                      Which is why it was deleted after it was reported. No bumping necessary...

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