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  • Electric garage heater opinions/advice

    A guy I talked to at work has one of these heaters in his shop and says its the cats a$$. I was wondering if any of you guys have ever used one of these?

    I was going to go with the modine hotdawg but this electric unit is tempting. I will only be heating the garage a day or two a week, just when im out there. I have a 20x22 insulated. Here is the link

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...t_6970_595_595
    HH 140
    Hobart stickmate ac/dc
    Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
    1950's Craftsman drillpress

  • #2
    It's only 17,000 BTU's, is that going to be large enough?

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    • #3
      The reviews on the northern site seem to be pretty good. I heard they maintain the heat well once they get warmed up.
      HH 140
      Hobart stickmate ac/dc
      Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
      1950's Craftsman drillpress

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      • #4
        I'd buy a 60,000 btu/hr unit and a thermostat for an insulated garage of this size located in MN.

        A 45,000 btu/hr heater may be able to manage it too, but you won't be too happy if your heater works non-stop when it's bitter cold outside.
        Last edited by MichaelP; 01-25-2009, 04:58 PM.

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        • #5
          I have that exact unit in a 25x30 shop. It's a nice unit but you won't get fast warm up with it. So if you think you want to go from cold soaked for 5 days to 65 degrees it isn't going to happen (at least not with some serious delay). What it will do is keep the garage from freezing (which is what I use it for) and it also works nice to swing it around and point it at my bench. It will take the chill out of standing there on a winter day. I'm considering getting a second one to decrease my warm up time.

          The big plus is there is no flame. The other night my nephew was here working on the fuel lines of a car. If I did have gas heat we wouldn't have been able to run it without fear of ending up on the moon.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by scapegoat View Post
            The reviews on the northern site seem to be pretty good. I heard they maintain the heat well once they get warmed up.
            You might be interested to know then that the reviews on Northern's site aren't exactly "impartial..." All reviews are moderated, and they toss those that say anything critical about the product. Look around on their site - you won't find a bad review on anything.
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            Hobart HH 125EZ


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            • #7
              I have $500 or less to spend for a unit to heat my garage. I will be out there a day or two a week for a couple hours. So I will only heating it while im out there.

              Yes I would like it to warm up pretty fast. And it looks like the electric unit wont do that for me huh? How efficient are the modine hotdawgs? Do they warm the area pretty fast? I just dont want to go broke from propane usage.
              HH 140
              Hobart stickmate ac/dc
              Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
              1950's Craftsman drillpress

              Comment


              • #8
                Hot Dawg

                I have the 60,000 BTU Modine Hot Dawg and I'm very happy with it. Like you, I only use it when I'm in my shop. I use a 40 pound bottle of propane and I just had to fill it up for the first time this winter. Granted, I'm not in my shop everyday, but I'm out there a couple of evenings a week.

                If I forget to turn my thermostat off and I leave it on all night I can eat up the propane bottle very quickly. However, if I'm careful with it I can get a surprising amount of use between fill-ups.

                It heats up my small shop very quickly. And I have it situated so that the warm air blows towards my work bench, so that I can sit and work after the heater has only been on for a couple of minutes. I highly recommend it.
                Miller Dynasty 200DX
                Hobart T225 Stick
                Hobart Handler 180
                Airco O/A Rig
                ESAB W-200 O/A torch

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by villemur View Post
                  I have the 60,000 BTU Modine Hot Dawg and I'm very happy with it. Like you, I only use it when I'm in my shop. I use a 40 pound bottle of propane and I just had to fill it up for the first time this winter. Granted, I'm not in my shop everyday, but I'm out there a couple of evenings a week.

                  If I forget to turn my thermostat off and I leave it on all night I can eat up the propane bottle very quickly. However, if I'm careful with it I can get a surprising amount of use between fill-ups.

                  It heats up my small shop very quickly. And I have it situated so that the warm air blows towards my work bench, so that I can sit and work after the heater has only been on for a couple of minutes. I highly recommend it.
                  How big is the area you're heating? How cold does it get where you live?
                  HH 140
                  Hobart stickmate ac/dc
                  Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
                  1950's Craftsman drillpress

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My Hot Dawg heats a semi-insulated area that is 24x15. It was -2 when I got up this morning. I probably could have done fine with one of the lower BTU models, but the price difference wasn't much, and I really wanted to be able to bring the temperature up fast in the shop.
                    Miller Dynasty 200DX
                    Hobart T225 Stick
                    Hobart Handler 180
                    Airco O/A Rig
                    ESAB W-200 O/A torch

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                    • #11
                      I've got a Hamilton WGH (essentially the same as a Modine Hot Dawg), I'm pretty sure I have the 45k version. It heats a 24x24 insulated garage in MN, and does so very well. The garage has R19 in the walls, R11 doors, and R36 in the ceiling though.

                      I had a load calculation done by a pro before I chose the size.

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                      • #12
                        You guys know anything about the Mr. Heaters? The ones similar to the modines? They are about $140 cheaper than the modines. I wonder if there is any difference in quality. Heres the link...
                        http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7961_200307961
                        HH 140
                        Hobart stickmate ac/dc
                        Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
                        1950's Craftsman drillpress

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Garage Heater

                          I have a "MR. Heater" 45K unit in a 2 1/2 car garage. If it is about 20 - 30 deg. It will heat my garage to 65 deg. in 30 minutes. It is natural gas not propane, but I wouldn't think that would make any difference. It is very small and is mounted up in the rafters flush with the ceiling framing. I mounted it to blow towards the center of the garage. Awesome heater, and easy to install. The thermostat is the same type as your house, so you could by a programmable one to turn the heat on when you want.

                          Take Care,
                          Todd

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                          • #14
                            I sounds like these modine/mr.heaters are a lot more capable than an electric unit. Im just not sure which one to go with. Modine or Mr.heater?
                            HH 140
                            Hobart stickmate ac/dc
                            Sanborn 7hp 60gal comp
                            1950's Craftsman drillpress

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The one you prefer cost and warranty wise. And don't forget you' may need to buy the exhaust separately.

                              If you hire an HVAC guy to install the unit and bring the natural gas pipe, he may find you a better deal on yet another brand from his supplier. For example, I found a guy who charged me about $650 to install a 100,000btu/hr heater in my 2 1/2 non-insulated garage. This included everything from the heater itself to gas and electrical work. This was an exceptionally good deal, of course.

                              As for the efficiency, the unit has no problem holding 70F and above when it's minus 10F outside, but it needs 2-3 hours to reach 60-70F.
                              Last edited by MichaelP; 01-27-2009, 02:05 AM.

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