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Garage walls...Drywall or osb?

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  • Rick Barter
    replied
    JustPassingThru:

    Thanks for the advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • JustPassingThru
    replied
    Rick Barter,

    Sorry for taking so long to respond, I don’t have much time during the week for the computer.

    When I was in the trades the green board was used in the bathrooms and kitchens and was usually covered with tile, sometimes it was just painted. I personally wouldn’t use drywall in a barn because it is very easy to break or puncture.

    What I was refering to about the 1/2" drywall sagging with high humidity is before the taping and painting is finished and the house is occupied, we tried hanging ceilings with 1/2" drywall on 24" centers and came back the next day to find it sagging between the joists, it was an experiment that our boss tried to save money that didn't work.

    Drywall is intended for use in homes that are kept at a comfortable temperature and insulated from the outside elements, if you were to hang it in a barn that is open to the outside elements the humidity or moisture could pose a problem, when drywall becomes wet or saturated from the humidity it is very weak and easy to break. If it were hung over head it is possible for the nails to “pop” and the sheet to fall, I suggest you look for a different material, maybe OSB or plywood.

    Scapegoat will probably be ok because he is insulating the walls and ceiling and “closing in” his garage to the elements.

    TuscolaMatt,

    I agree with you, if there was a concern for fire I would paint it so that it wasn’t bare.

    Gene

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  • TuscolaMatt
    replied
    Well, I'm quite the minority here. My shop (NOT connected to anything) has all OSB for interior walls for the bottom 4 feet. My shop (a 24 x 24 steel building) had the insulation installed between the skin and the perlins. I just wanted a little protection for the insulation and something to mount plugs into. My main thought was how easy it would be to accidentally bump a hole into sheet rock. OSB can take a much stiffer hit. I still haven't painted the stuff (I plan to eventually), but I've showered these walls with sparks from grinding and cutting for the past couple years. I've never had any burning issues. Granted, if a fire from another source were to start, it'd burn up quite nicely!

    On a side note, I built a catwalk last year and used OSB for the floor of it. The rest was all metal. Anyway, the last part I did on it was to weld a railing on. I was welding withing an inch of the OSB flooring. Out of the 12 welds I made, only 3 started to burn at all (and they mostly smoldered). Since then, I don't see OSB as a fire waiting to happen. The stuff is certainly not fireproof to any notable extent, but it's not exactly a powder keg either - heh heh.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rick Barter
    replied
    Originally posted by JustPassingThru View Post
    scapegoat,

    Hi this is my first post, I was reading the thread on how to build a pipe burner for my bbq and looked around a little and found your question. Many moons ago I was a rock hanger so maybe I can help you a little for the help I received on the pipe burner.

    For the ceilings we used ⅝” regular drywall because it was stronger and didn’t sag between the 24” spacing of the joists (something to consider if you have high humidity), we hung the ceiling first and then the walls (much easier to hang the ceiling first and not have to worry about having a tight fit and wrestling with the board over head trying to make it fit, always leave a ¼” gap, the drywall on the wall will cover it). For the walls you can use ½” or ⅝” regular drywall with the ⅝” being the stronger of the two and will hold up better.

    Back then the houses had ½” plywood as a shear wall between the house and the garage and then it was covered with ⅝” Firecode drywall to make a 1 hour fire wall. The plywood behind the drywall made a strong wall less likely to be punctured by normal usage in a garage.

    The green papered drywall is moisture resistant; probably something you wouldn’t need in a garage and the hardy board is brittle and can be punctured relatively easy. With the hardy board it is difficult to repair whereas with the drywall just cut out the damage, replace it and retape.

    I hope that helps you, Gene
    I got a question. I have a barn that I want to sheetrock, but was worried about mildew/moisture, etc. Is the green board what I need?

    Leave a comment:


  • JustPassingThru
    replied
    scapegoat,

    Glad to be of service, how I would love to have a 20'x22' garage.

    We hung 4'x12's, cuts down on the taping time, maybe you could rent a drywall jack, it holds the sheet tight against the joists so that you can nail it. A drywall supplier, like Home Depot, might have them to rent, or maybe even free use with purchase of the drywall.

    Since your garage is 20'x22' you need to think about how you are going to support the T out in the middle, if you use 8' sheets, the first sheet will cover to 8', then the second will be from 8' to 16', ...no wall to lean the T against, see what I mean? However after the first 12' sheet the next will be either 8' or 10' allowng the T to be leaned against the other wall and only one butt joint to tape.

    One more thing, mark out with a pencil where the trap is, but dont cut it out, the board will break when you try to lift it overhead, nail it first and then cut it out with a hand saw staying close the the framing members, the cut out is the piece for the trap, just picture frame the opening with wood allowing the wood to protude past the framing members about an inch and then set the cutout piece on the frame.

    Last thing, do you have a drywall axe, the head has a special form to dimple the rock so that the nail holds the sheet and the dimple fills with taping mud.

    Gene

    Leave a comment:


  • scapegoat
    replied
    Wow great info fellas! Yeah the garage is 20'x22' but its all I have so I want to make it as comfy and as safe as possible. You guys have posted some really great help.

    I am almost done with insulating and vapor barriering the walls and I was thinking about drywalling the walls first. But it sounds easier (JustPassingThru) to do the ceiling first. I imagine I should go with 4'x8' sheets for the ceiling (im sure a 4'x12' sheet would be impossible to lift to the ceiling.

    I was thinking about cutting an "attic" hole/door for the ceiling to use for the blow in insulation and also for a small storage area in the rafters. Hey thanks again guys.

    Leave a comment:


  • ptsideshow
    replied
    Durarock and all the fireproof/retardant underlayment type material all have warnings on them about the fact that they are made with sand and therefore are a breathing hazard (silicosis hazard) and shouldn't be used uncovered.
    Here is the USG site and the MSDS http://www.usg.com/navigate.do?resou...ment_Board.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • JustPassingThru
    replied
    scapegoat,

    I did a little more reading and found your post about the insulation, maybe I should explain a little about how to hang the drywall. You might already know this, but here goes, start off with hanging the ceiling first, frame in a trap so you will have access to blow in your insulation, make a support T out of 2x4, 4” longer than ceiling height and 3’ wide, lean it against a wall leaving about a 1” gap, place a ladder about ⅓ of the distance of the board length away from the T, place the board on top of the T and the ladder and then walk up the ladder pushing up the other end tight against the joists.

    We held up the board with the top of our heads and then nailed it, you might make a second T to hold the other end or have someone hold the second T and then you will be free to nail it.

    For the walls start at the top next to the ceiling, cut the tee leg in half and make a rectangle that is 3’ wide with the 2 leg pieces nailed to each end on the 4” side, nail a piece of scrap on the other side, lean it against the wall, place the drywall on top of it and holding it to the wall with your hands, kick the bottom towards the wall raising the sheet up until it is tight against the ceiling board.

    For the bottom sheet be sure and stagger the joints 4’ and then nail a piece of ¼” plywood to the end of a 16” 2x4, use a piece of ¾” pipe for a fulcrum, set it next to the wall, place the board on the jack and then step on the “jack” until the sheet is tight against the top sheet.

    This is assuming you have used standard 92 ¼” studs, if you walls are taller put the “ripped” piece between the top and bottom sheets, and always run the drywall perpendicular to the framing members.

    Drywall hanging 101, again I hope this helps, Gene

    Leave a comment:


  • JustPassingThru
    replied
    scapegoat,

    Hi this is my first post, I was reading the thread on how to build a pipe burner for my bbq and looked around a little and found your question. Many moons ago I was a rock hanger so maybe I can help you a little for the help I received on the pipe burner.

    For the ceilings we used ⅝” regular drywall because it was stronger and didn’t sag between the 24” spacing of the joists (something to consider if you have high humidity), we hung the ceiling first and then the walls (much easier to hang the ceiling first and not have to worry about having a tight fit and wrestling with the board over head trying to make it fit, always leave a ¼” gap, the drywall on the wall will cover it). For the walls you can use ½” or ⅝” regular drywall with the ⅝” being the stronger of the two and will hold up better.

    Back then the houses had ½” plywood as a shear wall between the house and the garage and then it was covered with ⅝” Firecode drywall to make a 1 hour fire wall. The plywood behind the drywall made a strong wall less likely to be punctured by normal usage in a garage.

    The green papered drywall is moisture resistant; probably something you wouldn’t need in a garage and the hardy board is brittle and can be punctured relatively easy. With the hardy board it is difficult to repair whereas with the drywall just cut out the damage, replace it and retape.

    I hope that helps you, Gene

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    If doing drywall, I don't think it is much more expensive to get the bathroom/kitchen stuff with the green mildew-resistant paper. You won't see it on your tract home except where necessary, but it may not be a budget blower for a one-time installation.

    Or is there a reason why you wouldn't put this somewhere unless it was required? I'm not a drywall guy. Is the stuff really worth it anyway or mostly a gimmick required by bribed Code writers?

    Leave a comment:


  • boilerman79
    Guest replied
    I used dry-wall on all the walls except the welding area,there I used hardy-board-[cement board?].I bought a roll of welding curtain to separate the open area [double stacked it to get 10 ft height],made a frame out of 1/2 inch pipe to hang it from.So far it has worked great.The welding area is 24 x 20.So it took almost the whole roll to do it.I believe you can never do to much as far as fire saftey is concerned.It wasnt the cheapest way to go but I think it may be the safest[unless you finish the inside in brick.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    For a detached building, 1/2" is code, but 5/8" is so much better that the additional cost is far outweighed by the added safety factor, IMHO. I'd do the lid in /8 also.

    Hank

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  • scapegoat
    replied
    The garage is detached. What is the standard thickness for drywall for the walls? Any certain drywall to look for? Also I would be doing the ceiling eventually.

    Leave a comment:


  • hankj
    replied
    5/8ths drywal = 1 hour fire protection. If the garage is attached, code requires that the wall next to the dwelling side be 1 hour rated.

    OSB is strong, for sure, but it is not very fire resistant. It is loaded with resins and glues. Makes a nice, BIG fire!

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • scapegoat
    replied
    Yeah at first I was thinking osb for the durability factor. But I started thinking about welding in the garage. I am always cutting or welding some type of metal out there. I don't think osb and flyng molten metal mix well.

    So then I considered drywall. It should be more fire resistant than the osb.

    Leave a comment:

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