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Grill Top For An Outdoor Barbeque

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  • Grill Top For An Outdoor Barbeque

    Hi all. This is a different kinda project. I want to be able to put a sheet of steel over the top of my gas barbeque grates for "grill cooking". The grate surface is 18"x24". There are several issues. One, I want to put a 1/2" tall edge all around to trap any grease. Two, I need to put a drain in it some where to drain off the grease. Three, how do I weld the edge (and get a good seal) all around without really warping it to death? I was thinking of using 1/4" plate for the top, how does that sound? Does anyone know if fabrication shops can bend 1/4" steel on all 4 sides? You guys are good so any thoughts out there? Uncrichie.

  • #2
    Two opposite sides can be formed easily enough, just hit it with the press brake. If the shop has what are called "sectional dies", they can also do the other two sides. Sectional dies come in various sizes, just add and subtract to get the inside width you need.

    Most likely, forming 1/4" plate, the lip will be 1" or slightly more, to be able to use the correct bottom die.
    Last edited by calweld; 10-25-2008, 11:43 AM.
    *** Disclaimer ***

    As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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    • #3
      Thanks Calweld, that sounds promising. I can always grind the edge down to my desired height. That would only require corner welding, sweet! I have to figure in the placement of the drain, possibly through the front edge to a soup can. Keep it comin fellas. Uncrichie.

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      • #4
        1/4" sounds awefully thick. Won't that take a long time to heat up and be kinda heavy. I just used some 12 ga sheet on a flat bed trailer I was working on and that seemed to be pretty solid. It would be easier to form as well since you wouldn't need as large a press to bend it. Just my 2 cents.

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        • #5
          Or you just buy a ready-made cast iron griddle that's designed for exactly that, and be done.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Zrexxer View Post
            Or you just buy a ready-made cast iron griddle that's designed for exactly that, and be done.
            No fun ...........
            *** Disclaimer ***

            As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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            • #7
              I've got a plate on 1/2 of my gas grill for toasting buns, grilling veggies, etc. Mine is 1/4" and does take some time to heat. As far as the grease goes, I drilled a series of 1/4" holes in mine about 3" apart. I can post a pic of it if necessary.
              Jim

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bandsawguy View Post
                1/4" sounds awefully thick. Won't that take a long time to heat up and be kinda heavy. I just used some 12 ga sheet on a flat bed trailer I was working on and that seemed to be pretty solid. It would be easier to form as well since you wouldn't need as large a press to bend it. Just my 2 cents.
                Actually, a griddle needs to have a certain amount of mass, so when you throw cold food on it, it doesn't suddenly loose heat, and will still cook evenly.
                *** Disclaimer ***

                As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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                • #9
                  Uncritchie, consider having it slightly cross-broke first,,,, that is, a slight bump from corner to corner, an "X". This will raise the center a little, then drill a small hole in each corner, to drain the fat. It's a BBQ, don't matter if a little fat drips into the fire .....
                  *** Disclaimer ***

                  As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks everyone for your comments. I know there are ready made cast iron griddles but not to my size. Hey Calweld if I can get a shop to make the bends for me I won't weld up the corners, hence my grease drains!!! Uncrichie.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by calweld View Post
                      Actually, a griddle needs to have a certain amount of mass, so when you throw cold food on it, it doesn't suddenly loose heat, and will still cook evenly.
                      I think you might be onto something here... At a restaurant I used to work at, our specialty was burgers. The grill was a slab 36" by 60" by an inch thick. When we got busy burgers and other grilled items would take much longer because the heat from the grill would be absorbed by the cold meats placed upon the grill. However, I think that you might not need such a high heat capacity if you aren't turning so much food. 1/4 inch might be okay, depending on what your needs are. PS... I prefer a solid grill for certain dishes, and a grated grill for others. What is your heat supply?

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                      • #12
                        If you look at restaurant supply catalog better griddles will have thicker cooking surface. Thicker is better. Trough in front is much better than holes but might not work with your bbq. Separate left/right heat controls are better.

                        I have smallest rectangular Weber gas bbq. Only sell griddle for larger model. I have cut down an aluminum griddle from Walmart camping section so it fits inside with lid down or I use cast iron griddle when not packing in small car. Must have side burner for pots.

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