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'Side jobs' possible with a 110V MIG?

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  • 'Side jobs' possible with a 110V MIG?

    I'm wondering if anyone can offer any helpful suggestions for types of work (if any!) that are possible on a 'side job/part time' basis with only a small MIG. I do have a MIG cert. from the local community college, but limited industry experience. I'd be interested in hearing any useful/constructive possibilities, if they exist, for a guy with just a small MIG.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by MarkG View Post
    I'm wondering if anyone can offer any helpful suggestions for types of work (if any!) that are possible on a 'side job/part time' basis with only a small MIG. I do have a MIG cert. from the local community college, but limited industry experience. I'd be interested in hearing any useful/constructive possibilities, if they exist, for a guy with just a small MIG.

    Thanks!
    Your best bet is in ornamental iron, window security, light railing, garden art, etc., and even here, you will be very limited in what you can do, and will face lots of competition. Do up samples of excellent work to show people what you can do, and make sure you live up to your samples. (You will need to buy/scrounge/make lots of other tools to do this).

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    • #3
      For the work you indicated you want to target, no one gives a hoot about certs. You'll be limited to repairing things that break if you can't cut, bend/form and drill. I do quick repairs for friends or colleagues from work, for free, and no one can undercut that "price". Every farm around me has a stick, mig or both and they do the same. One guy tried to open his own light welding service near me and couldn't make a go of it.

      Depending on where you live, if the local authorities find out you are open for business they might chase you down and make you get a business license. In Maryland they are very aggressive in that aspect.
      CanoeCruiser
      Harris dual-stage O/A
      Lincoln AC/DC buzzbox
      Hobart IronMan 210
      Lincoln PowerMig 135
      Miller 3035 spoolgun
      Thermal Arc 185
      Thermadyne Cutmaster 52
      Angle grinders, vicegrips, the usual suspects
      Two hands, tired body, not enough time...

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      • #4
        Welding is a serious endeavor. Yes, you can do some lawn mower deck and simple bracket repairs and be a neighborhood hero. My kid (a trained welder) has done a few repair jobs for $10 here, $20 or $30 there. But those were for acquaintances. Just to help pay for the setup. Off the radar and not critical. Get the word out and "authorities" whose jobs depends on stomping small craftsmen will be all over you.
        --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

        Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
        -------------------------
        DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
        Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

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        • #5
          You should pursue your talent. Incorporate some fab with art and painting. This needs some marketing and it is different than advertising. What you want to sell is advertising. I have seen guys make a good living with a paint brush. Guys that are good at it will paint anything, freshen signs and are good with color consultation, what looks good at night. I might take the time to learn about plastic sign faces, much of it that used to be done in house for sign plants is not farmed out with specialists but there would be a lot of potential for sales to small stores.
          I might be tempted to find some stuff I could sell, find a vendor for open signs, neon etc. Look at color at night with illumination, the difference in faces between night and day etc. Be a value added consultant vs strictly a salesman who often agrees with customers to make sales and frequently get it wrong.
          I have written this same thing on another forum but it doesn't seem like it really registers, stuff like expensive welding gloves seem to get in the way and interrupt the focus. The welding part is ok but it needs to go along with something.
          Broc on here is a good example, in production support, has integrated it in to his business without trying to sell "welding" work.
          Last edited by Sberry; 07-21-2017, 09:12 AM.
          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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