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  • Tool Cart

    This christmas I was lucky enough to receive a new tool chest for christmas! The tool chest is a Mastercraft Maximum 5 drawer tool chest (http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/brows....jsp?locale=en) and I am planning on building a rolling cart to hold it, plus more tool storage on shelves underneath. I am planning on constructing it with some angle iron I salvaged from some old bed frames and welding it up with either some 6011 or the cheap 7018 AC I have.

    Hopefully I will get to building this in the next couple weeks during exam break. If you guys have any thoughts or input it would be greatly appreciated!

  • #2
    I don't know about bed frames in Canada. But down below (in US) they are pretty tough to work with.... They are a very hard steel (high carbon?) and cuts rather hard and drills miserably..... Had thoughts of accumulating them when available as "stock" for projects, but now have abandon those ideas when I remember how miserable that material is to work with.....

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the input, I will try a couple small test welds and cuts with it before I start the build just to see how difficult they are to work with. Being that I am a cheap high school student I find it hard going and spending money on new steel, but I will see how it goes!

      Comment


      • #4
        IT may cut and weld just fine.... When you try to drill it, you will discover what hard really is....

        Dale
        Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't plan on doing any drilling, just welding and cutting with abrasives.

          Comment


          • #6
            Update!

            So over the past couple days I started, and almost completed the cart. I built it using almost two entire bed frames. A buddy of mine helped to grind most of the paint off and helped to set it up. Total time on the project was probably 10 hours with planning and I still have a some welding, grinding, and possibly painting left.

            Here are a few photos from the build.


            This is what I started out with, to large mystery metal bed frames.


            Here is the first rectangle I built, this is now the bottom piece.


            A buddy of mine grinding tacks off the piece from the previous photo.


            The second rectangle finished.


            This is a really crappy picture, but I coped all the corners and did all the welding from the outside so I wouldn't have to try and grind out the inside.


            Test fitting to make sure it all works, note the Miller sticker!


            All clamped up and ready to be tacked together.


            Same friend posing with the first "real" test fit.


            The power of Blue behind all the welding, my 1955 Miller 61P!


            This is my first semi-serious welding injury, not at all related to this project but I was cutting some small diameter pipe with some 1/8" 6011 at about 180 amps and the freshly cut end went up under my hood immediately after it severed. It happened about two and a half weeks ago, and now you can barely tell its there!



            I welded the mystery metal with cheap 1/8" Lincoln 7018AC at about 75-80 amps, the metal itself was probably about 1/8" and reacted quite similarly to normal mild steel, however I did not try to drill into it. I have yet to decide if I am going to shine it up and clear-coat it, or paint it Miller blue. At first blue seemed the way to go, but seeing it shiny with the stainless steel tool chest looks so good! What do you guys think?

            I plan on purchasing some 400lb castors from Princess Auto to make it a little more mobile, but I may just cheap out and use the old ones from the bed frame.

            Thats all for tonight seeing as it is a little after 1:00am, I will post more pics after I paint and attach the castors.

            Thanks for reading!

            Comment


            • #7
              What a beautifull old Welder! One year older than me.
              Put as large of wheels on it as fits the scale of the design.
              2 fixed and 2 swivel. Small wheels are little better than no wheels.
              And all swivel are a pain. Keep them close to the outside corners.
              Some guys mount wheels to far in from the corners, ouch!
              Nice little scar too.

              vg
              Last edited by vicegrip; 02-01-2013, 04:03 AM.
              sigpicViceGrip
              Negative people have a problem for every solution

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by vicegrip View Post
                What a beautifull old Welder! One year older than me.
                Put as large of wheels on it as fits the scale of the design.
                2 fixed and 2 swivel. Small wheels are little better than no wheels.
                And all swivel are a pain. Keep them close to the outside corners.
                Some guys mount wheels to far in from the corners, ouch!
                Nice little scar too.

                vg
                Yes it is! I got it from my step-grandfather last summer, I haven't used it a ton but the little I have has been great! Thanks for the advice! I planned on having the top shelf at 36" and currently it is at 30" to fit 5" castors with an over-all height of 6" I agree on 2 swivel 2 fixed, but still trying to figure out if I can afford to get new ones.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Always put the biggest wheels/caster you can afford on welder base and tool carts.... Makes it easier to run over your toes and other assorted flotsam and jetsam on shop floor... I like 4 inch caster at minimum...

                  Dale
                  Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice work on the cart. Most of my welder carts are at least 50% bed rail. I like the welder also, it must have been the forerunner for my Model 88 (early 1960s vintage). How may amps? Mine is 300 amp AC

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                    • #11
                      Dale, I didn't think of inflatable tires, good idea! I may do that!

                      cope, I was quite surprised with how well the bed frames worked out. Quite possibly, I don't know too much about it, but I did get an owners manual from Miller. It is 180 AC amps, I wish it was DC!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Making your own rectifier-bridge is one of the easyest and inexpensive
                        projects you can do.

                        You can learn also about electricity fundamentals in process!
                        Phil
                        sigpicViceGrip
                        Negative people have a problem for every solution

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by vicegrip View Post
                          Making your own rectifier-bridge is one of the easyest and inexpensive
                          projects you can do.

                          You can learn also about electricity fundamentals in process!
                          Phil
                          Oh really? Do you have any more information, or have you done it? I would love to convert this machine to DC! I have yet to open it up and clean it out, when I tried to undo all the screws hold the cover on, a couple of them were on so tight I had to use an impact driver and that still didn't even do anything, however it did twist the bit pretty badly!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by the-apprentice View Post
                            Dale, I didn't think of inflatable tires, good idea! I may do that!
                            On my MIG cart I put 10 inch solid rubber wheels on rear under tank... And 4 inch casters on front (worked out to keep base level).... Hate tiny wheels that get jammed on tiny things on floor...Like a bean on the floor and a shopping cart in supermarket....

                            Dale
                            Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by the-apprentice View Post
                              Oh really? Do you have any more information, or have you done it? I would love to convert this machine to DC!
                              I can't muster the patience to do the searching.
                              There were a few good threads on this topic a few years ago. One of them mine.
                              I showed some pics of one, an excellant engineer built in his home-shop.

                              I still have it, but not to sell. I'ts a mommento of a great Mentor's brother.
                              Phil
                              sigpicViceGrip
                              Negative people have a problem for every solution

                              Comment

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