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Deburring Tumber question

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  • Deburring Tumber question

    Okay, it's been awhile since I started this, but I have a need again, so I'm resurrecting this project.

    I'm building a deburring tumbler. I'm not sure what media I'll use yet, but I'm in the process of building a hexagonal barrel about 15" long and 24" across. I am planning to use either plywood or particle board for the walls. They'll be retained by bolts through the angle frame.

    Here's the question...

    What do they use to line the inside of a commercially available tumbler? Or do they just allow the inside to wear until the barrel is no longer usable? I thought about getting some rubber sheets, but I don't know.

    Dave
    Still building my new old truck - see the progress!
    http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/65...-coe-idea.html
    http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=27017

    Square Wave TIG 200 - Woot!
    MM180
    SP125+

  • #2
    I've seen some coated with products similar to what they use for truck beds....the spray on or brush on type rubber.

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    • #3
      This guy built a rock tumbler that uses old tires:

      http://www.acc.umu.se/~widmark/lwtrumle.html
      http://www.acc.umu.se/~widmark/bigtumbler.pdf


      If you can track down the guys in your local electrical utility who test the orange rubber blankets used on bucket trucks, maybe you can score a couple of defective ones. They have to insulation test them and junk them if they fail. It's really tough stuff, almost 3/16ths thick. They usually cut them in half, though sometimes they only lop off a corner to prevent them from accidentally getting back in service.

      http://www.whsalisbury.com/blankets/index.htm

      Another liner might be HDPE sheet. It is fairly inexpensive in 1/16"- 1/8". Or cut up old 5 gallon pails.
      --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

      Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
      -------------------------

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      • #4
        Only ones I have ever used were concrete mixers.

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        • #5
          big tire on a set of powered rollers works great

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          • #6
            I made a couple of attempts at a tumbler the last couple of weeks, using motors and a gear-box I had on hand.

            It wasn't successful as both motors (1/6hp) got real hot...one even died/seized....the gearbox never got hot though.

            I would like to make one similar to the tire version (using a motor and pulleys driving shafts) but now I don't know what kind or size motor I need....does it need to have an integral fan?

            Most tumblers seem to run for looong stretches of time, what kind of motor will run continuously under load like that??

            Sorry to side-track the thread, it just seemed to be a good place to jump in.

            Thanks all,

            John

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            • #7
              You need a continuous duty rated motor, and obviously one that has enough power to avoid overworking. For a small tumbler, a ceiling fan motor might work. Maybe you could find a used 1/4 horsepower fan or blower motor.
              --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

              Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
              -------------------------

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              • #8
                Electric Induction motor because it has no brushes.

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