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grinding/sanding down welds?

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  • grinding/sanding down welds?

    just wanted to ask for your guys opinion for grinding/sanding down welds.
    i recently compleated my first welding project (welding in floor pans on my 74 volkswagen super beetle) and now im at the point where i need to smooth out the weld beads i made.
    so i just wanted to know if using a angled air diegrinder with a sanding pad would work or not? i have a dewalt electirc angle grinder but its hard to get real smooth with it aswell as getting into tight spaces.

    Jonathan

  • #2
    Yeah, it'll work, but may take a whole lotta time. Try using a 50grit sanding pad on your electric (I assume its a 4"?) for the rough stuff, then finishing it with the air tool.

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    • #3
      They make a wheel for your angle grinder that is made from small pieces of emery cloth. Some cal it a flapper wheel. Excellent for gettiing a nice smooth surface and they really cut fast.

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      • #4
        thanks, i think i saw some of them flaper discs at the local welding supplier, ill check them out.

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        • #5
          I forgot, the bad part about flapper wheels is that grinding paint will clog them up and make them useless.

          So be careful not to clog them up, and they'll do a great job for ya.

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          • #6
            Flap wheels for sanding with outside Diameter of wheel. Flap disc for sanding with side of disc. They are nice as grit looses cutting edge new grit is exposed. They expand at speed providing a flexable sanding surface less likely to gouge than disc grinder.

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            • #7
              ya, the other problem with the dewalt angle grider was that its hard not to gouge/go to deep, and since its only sheat metal its important that i dont weaken it any further.
              so im gonna try and get to harborfreight tools today to check out angled air diegriders and then the welding supplier for the sanding wheels.

              Thanks
              Jonathan

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              • #8
                Jonathan

                If these welds are on a floor pan why worry about sanding them down? In the end won t they be covered by carpet or something else? Your weld joints will be much stronger if you don t sand the weld bead down. Im not picking on you my friend, just wanting to know why it is necessary to remove the weld bead reinforcement in this circumstance.
                MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                PM 180C



                HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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                • #9
                  well i wasent planing on laying capeting, im building a track/weekend car. if it dosent need to be there... no need puting it in

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                  • #10
                    An angle grinder with normal grinding wheel to knock the tops off of the weld beads, switching to a flap disc to finish grinding the welds down and smoothing things out. The air die grinder with a cut-off wheel has it's advantages (less heat build-up) but is time consuming, it is best used in tight spots. Just keep in mind that grinding can cause the pannels to warp almost as easy as welding them, so take your time and wear safety glasses, believe me it's not fun laying in the Emergency room watching as a doctor picks a sliver of metal from your eye!!!!

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                    • #11
                      Gee...I always thought that was why they made really strong magnets. I've been known to remove my own slivers/sparks that way when one sneaks in behind the glasses. It probably isn't approved by any medical society though.
                      Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
                      The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

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                      • #12
                        :P

                        Well i got an air diegrinder yesterday, now i just need a disc or two.

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                        • #13
                          Die grinder with chuck for 1/4" D tools are great. They can use cutoff wheels, carbide grinding burrs, wire wheels and much more. I have both electric and air driven models. Right angle air die grinders can get into places straight one can't easly reach.

                          Small belt sanders as pictured in this link are good for lowering welding beads in tight spaces with little gouging.
                          http://www.usaweld.com/product_page/...#Belt%20Sander

                          Making good welds will reduce or eliminate need for grinding.

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                          • #14
                            Somebody posted a belt sander attachment similar to that one, for a electric right angle grinder. Any one remember where that was?

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                            • #15
                              Here ya go Rocky D....
                              HF Sander Attachment

                              I have one of these, and it works quite well...especially for the price.

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