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table...need help with connections

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  • table...need help with connections

    I'm going to make a table. The frame is made of metal and the table top is made of wood. anybody have suggestions on how to connect the wooden table top to the metal frame?
    I was thinking small pieces of angle...I'm looking for a really clean way to attach the table top. the table top has an overhang of an inch around...

  • #2
    pic

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    • #3
      typical table

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      • #4
        Weld some small tabs on and slot them (dont just drill, a slot will allow the wood to expand and contract). Then secure the top with drywall screws

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        • #5
          I would use small pieces of 1"X1"x1/8" angle welded to the inside of the 1"X3" tube. You can screw from the bottom up into the table top. It will be invisible unless you are laying on the floor in under the table.
          Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
          The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

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          • #6
            Why slots? Drill oversize hole for screw or bolt then use washer under screw/bolt head. This is much easier.

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            • #7
              I would drill a larger hole on the bottom of the 3in tube, reach in with a drill extension and drill the smaller hole for the top. Put a wood screw on a magnetic screwdriver thru the big hole then into the small one.

              Cap off the large hole with plastic or wood.

              Have Fun!
              It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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              • #8
                Originally posted by russell

                Hope you can post a picture of it.


                russell
                I will as soon as i finish!

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                • #9
                  I would do as Arbo suggested...little tabs with holes in them...wood shrinkage and expansion has never been a problem for me. You are attaching the legs the hard way, IMHO. I would cut 45 degree angles on the rectangular tube, make the frame, and then attach the legs lapped on the inside for greater strength.

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                  • #10
                    I finished the frame today. The welds on the longer sides are ground smooth. the welds attaching the longer sides I tacked for now.

                    I like the finish of the steel as it is, but i might bring it to a cheap body shop like earl scheib and have them paint it BMW M3 silver! (just kidding any kind of silver will do!) or since i like the natural finish so much i might spray it with some clear coat.

                    here's some progress pics...the wood table top is next

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                    • #11
                      here's another

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                      • #12
                        Looks real nice...do you do your welding in the kitchen??
                        kidding
                        I would suggest putting little feet on it to keep it from digging into the linoleum. Good job, looks real professional.

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                        • #13
                          Looks like the makings of a good table. I hope you don t mind, but I want to address how you chose to tack weld this frame work together. On the attached picture with this post I have marked the location were I would have tacked the tube. Tack welds generally have shallow penetration and by placing them in your weld joint were you have you create a very inconsistant depth of penetration along the length of the weld bead. Plus, more then likely when you weld over these tacks you end up with a lumpy looking weld bead. There are times when you need to tack along the length of the weld joint, but this joint is short enough and the material is thick enough that it shouldn t be needed. Im not trying to pick on you, just trying to help.
                          Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:18 AM.
                          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                          PM 180C



                          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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                          • #14
                            the legs are 1X1 and the siderails are 1x3...both 16 ga.

                            it's gonna be in the kitchen and will be used for food preparation while sitting. as for the type of wood...i'm still looking around. i definately want light colored wood though.

                            rr

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                            • #15
                              Soft Maple would make a nice long lasting table top, very light, almost white, very tight grain. If you cut it in 1 by 1 strips and glue together it would have a butcher block appearance.
                              It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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