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  • Simple Rod Oven

    I am a new welder and I just started visiting this site a few weeks ago. This is an excellent site for someone like me who is trying to be a self taught welder. This site seems very friendly and highly educational. One item that I thought I could use was a rod oven. I am sure that there are simpler designs and better ideas but this is what I can up with.This was the starting material list:
    1) 2 pcs 1/8" carbon steel plate 15 inches square. (front & rear)
    2) 1 piece 12 inch long thin gauge pipe 20 inches long. (body)
    3) 1 piece 14" x 14" x 1/8" carbon steel plate. (door)
    4) 1 piano hinge 12" long.
    5) insulation and aluminum covering
    6) light socket with cord and 60 watt light bulb.
    7) 1 pcs expanded metal 6" x 18". (bottom shelf)
    8) 1 pcs expanded metal 12" x 18". (middle shelf)
    9) 4 pcs 1/2" angle 16" long. (shelf supports)

    The first step was to weld the front and back to the body.
    This is the first picture that I am posting so I hope that it works. Is there a way to post multiple pictures in one post?
    More to come in later posts.
    Lamar

  • #2
    This is the inside. You can see how the front plate was cut out in an octagon pattern. Insulation was installed for the back and two shelves were added. The shelves are expanded metal with the rear end bent up. This rear end was kept 4 inches from the rear to protect my heating source which is a 60 watt light. You can also see the door which is fastened with a piano hinge and the gasketing material around the outside for a seal.
    Lamar

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    • #3
      I ran out of time. I will post the insulated and completed pictures tonight.
      Lamar

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      • #4
        Nice job on the oven, just don't try to keep low hydrogen electrodes in it unless you can maintain a constant 250 F.
        Respectfully,
        Mike Sherman
        Shermans Welding

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        • #5
          Lerdman, what kind of insulation are you using and where can we get some like it? The oven looks like it should work really well. Thanks for the idea and keep the pictures coming.

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          • #6
            I wonder if automobile firewall insulation would work in this project? Just a thought.
            It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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            • #7
              If your building on cheap get thermostat and insulation (rock wool) from old oven. Use ceramic light bulb socket that can take high heat so it can be upgraded to screw in heating element.

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              • #8
                This is the outside of the oven after it was insulated and covered with aluminum sheeting. To answer Mojunk, the insulation is 1 inch Kaowool. This is a high temp insulation (2400 F). Kaowool is the original asbestos replacement material invented by Bab**** and Wilcox. Inswool is a similar competing product. In blanket form Kaowool is comonly used to insulate high temperature furnaces, and to build forges and kilns.

                http://www.anvilfire.com/sales/k_index.htm

                High temperature insulation should be available from an insulation contractor or boiler installer. If all of the insulation is kept on the outside of the oven, pratically any insulation will work. Auto firewall insulation should work.

                The heating source is a 60 watt light installed in the rear of the oven. This keeps the oven at 90 degree F with the outside temperature at 20 degree F. I also tried a 100 watt strip heater in the bottom of the oven and that gave me an inside temperature of 140 degree F. I was going to use a light dimmer switch with the heater strip but decided on the 60 watt bulb since I have been using mostly 7014 and 6010 rod. My understanding is that this rod should be stored at 90 F to 115 F with low humidity. This makes the 60 watt bulb just perfect for this application(summer and winter). I will also drill a small hole in the door and glue a piece of plexiglass to the inside. This indicator will let me know if the bulb is burned out. I was also planning on putting some desiccant bags under the bottom shelf. This should collect some of the humidity if the bulb burns out for a few days before I change it.

                In the future if I need to store low hydrogen electrodes I will build another oven with a larger heating source.

                Lamar

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                • #9
                  This is a almost finished product setting on my workbench waiting for it's first batch of rods. The only thing left is to finish the top. The reason I used square ends was so that I could build a box on top of the oven for unopened boxes of electrodes or etc.... This will probably get finished when the weather gets a little warmer.

                  Lamar

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                  • #10
                    Lamar, that's a really nice and useful project. Thanks for the pictures and the idea. Good job!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lerdman
                      This is a almost finished product setting on my workbench waiting for it's first batch of rods. The only thing left is to finish the top. The reason I used square ends was so that I could build a box on top of the oven for unopened boxes of electrodes or etc.... This will probably get finished when the weather gets a little warmer.

                      Lamar
                      Nice hot box, Lamar, I especially like the foil wrap job. I use Kaowool, in my shop for wrapping cast iron parts after welding. Too bad it is so crumbly.

                      did you layout the octogon with a compass or use a formula? I have (somewhere) a formula and chart for laying out chords of circles...I have to find it and post it..it's a good tool.

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                      • #12
                        RockyD
                        You are correct with the term "Hot Box" which is a better word than oven. As far as the octagon, I just used a ruler and started finding centers and drawing angles. A formula or a chart would make things easier. That would be a good post.

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                        • #13
                          If you guys are nice to me , maybe on Friday or Saturday I ll post how to layout an octagon with a compass, or trammel points. And if your real nice I might even show you how to layout a hexagon too. Also, if time allows I might even show you a pentagon. Anyone interested in seeing these?
                          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                          PM 180C



                          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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                          • #14
                            Surely I'm interested. I'd like to see how it's done.

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                            • #15
                              layout

                              Dan, I can do the hexagon, but my high school geometry has failed me on the others. Would like to see.

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