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  • ? for Rocky D and Dan

    First of all let me say you guys photo's of some of your welding beads are great and have admired the photo ability you have shown in taking the pictures and posting them on this forum. The thought has occurred to me that it would sure be nice to see some bad welds and the causes for them posted. I know you guys must see a lot of them out there and I am also sure you must know what caused the welds to be bad. Could you post something like that where it would be very educational for the guys having trouble figuring out what might be wrong with there welds, they could see some similar welds and look at what could cause the welds to be bad. Just and idea I have thought of a few times. I have seen some bad looking welds in some welding books but usually the photo's aren't that good quality.

  • #2
    bad welding

    I would like to see that also. I think most of my problems right now stem from to being able to see. I have two 500 wat halogen lights not and that has helped. I guess I need to add the electronic shade to my growing list of things I need to get. I think once I get my welding table built I should be able to position things at a more advantageous angle.
    Short Term Memory GONE!!
    Hobby Weldor/Machinist
    Photobucket Shop Pics

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    • #3
      Deere,

      I had the same problem. Always trying to weld on the floor. I finally broke down and built a bench. If you search back through this board, there are alot of neat ideas to optimize yours.
      Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
      The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

      Comment


      • #4
        Bob

        When I first started, I had not taken the thin plastic protective film off my helmet lens ... pretty stupid of me but boy oh boy did that help.

        Also near-sighted with contacts, one for computer distance one for far ... hurts depth perception and close up. So I take those out (or put only the mid-range lens in the normally far eye). Also seems pretty obvious, but took me a while.

        You can take the nozzle off the torch if you are using the self sheilding wire. More of a "training wheels" approach as the nozzle is needed using solid wires and gas.

        In the Welders Handbook, Finch says you should try for a position like being seated at a desk to write a letter. I don't have true table yet, but turn the work, prop it on top of stuff and did get out the chair. Steady rest for the fore arms is really helpful to get the weave, stick out, and motion all working together.

        Lately I have been using higher voltage settings and turning down the wire speed. Trying to get the heat with out so much new metal so I can go a little slower.

        Bob
        Last edited by Bob; 11-26-2002, 07:53 AM.

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        • #5
          Re: ? for Rocky D and Dan

          Originally posted by gnewby
          First of all let me say you guys photo's of some of your welding beads are great and have admired the photo ability you have shown in taking the pictures and posting them on this forum. The thought has occurred to me that it would sure be nice to see some bad welds and the causes for them posted. I know you guys must see a lot of them out there and I am also sure you must know what caused the welds to be bad. Could you post something like that where it would be very educational for the guys having trouble figuring out what might be wrong with there welds, they could see some similar welds and look at what could cause the welds to be bad. Just and idea I have thought of a few times. I have seen some bad looking welds in some welding books but usually the photo's aren't that good quality.
          Your asking alot of me. It is going to be difficult for me to make a poor looking weld but I ll give it a try. I will most definately have to try this one when the wife isn t around. If she sees me running bad welds, Ill be hearing about it for a while. Im assuming your wanting these poor quality weld to be performed with the GMAW process. Is this right? I dont know when I ll have time to do this. First thing that I m wanting accomplish right now is to get a bottle of 98/2 and give spray transfer a try with my MM 210 using an .030 and .035 wire. However, if I have to MIG weld at work, I will try and remember to run a few low quality samples.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

          Comment


          • #6
            How bout if some of us post pics of some of "our" poor welds and we can have them diagnosed and catagorized on the site to show others?
            AtoZ Fabrication, Inc.
            Miller MM210--now X2
            Hypertherm 380
            Miller autodark hood

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Re: ? for Rocky D and Dan

              Originally posted by Dan


              Your asking alot of me. It is going to be difficult for me to make a poor looking weld but I ll give it a try. I will most definately have to try this one when the wife isn t around. If she sees me running bad welds, Ill be hearing about it for a while. Im assuming your wanting these poor quality weld to be performed with the GMAW process. Is this right? I dont know when I ll have time to do this. First thing that I m wanting accomplish right now is to get a bottle of 98/2 and give spray transfer a try with my MM 210 using an .030 and .035 wire. However, if I have to MIG weld at work, I will try and remember to run a few low quality samples.


              I was sure when I asked you, that you could come through with it. Maybe what you could do is get your wife to make some of the welds and tell her you want to get some pictures of different technics in welding. Something that came to mind that was funny though, was having one of you guys taking pictures of a co-workers welds and telling him you needed to get some pictures of some poor quality welds. Now that would definately be a way to win friends and influience people wouldn't it? Makes you chuckle just thinking about it. Yes GMAW is the process I was thinking about. I know some of the guys have posted pictures of some of their welds here but it seems like you and RocKy D have a knack for getting the best pictures of welds. I know I have posted some pictures of some of my projects and some of the pictures haven't turned out very good. Thanks In Advance

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ZACHV
                How bout if some of us post pics of some of "our" poor welds and we can have them diagnosed and catagorized on the site to show others?

                That sounds like a winner as long as the photo quality is good. I have seen several books with good pictures of stick welds but haven't seen much in the way of GMAW that I would call good quality photo's. So the thought occured to me this would be the perfect way to see some pictures with explainations on what could have caused the weld to be bad. Your idea sounds good also besides it would give everyone something to look back at, if they saw some photo's of some of their earlier welds and then re-examined the photo's after a few months of practicing.

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                • #9
                  I should be able to provide every example of a poor weld I guess you have to specialize in something
                  AtoZ Fabrication, Inc.
                  Miller MM210--now X2
                  Hypertherm 380
                  Miller autodark hood

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gnewby



                    That sounds like a winner as long as the photo quality is good. I have seen several books with good pictures of stick welds but haven't seen much in the way of GMAW that I would call good quality photo's. So the thought occured to me this would be the perfect way to see some pictures with explainations on what could have caused the weld to be bad. Your idea sounds good also besides it would give everyone something to look back at, if they saw some photo's of some of their earlier welds and then re-examined the photo's after a few months of practicing.
                    Gnewby, I did just what you ask for my company, once. We had 25 weldors who were have difficulty getting their parts through inspection, so they asked me to do a pictoral of various types of rejectable heliarc welds on .064" plates.

                    They wanted to see undercut, cold lap, pin holes, and some others. The one I liked best was tungsten inclusion...I got the puddle going and then jammed the tungsten through the plate and cut the current! It looked like an arrow had gone through it!

                    They mounted the plates on a piano hinge, so you could see both sides of the plates and posted it in the middle of the shop, where everyone had access to it. They also made a booklet of pictures that each weldor was required to keep.

                    That was an extremely difficult thing for me to do, was to make bad welds on purpose. Dan will find that out too. Once you've spent years trying to make perfect welds, it just goes against the very synapses of your mind to do wrong. You set the controls too hot, or too cold, but your hand actually finds a way to make it look good subconsciously. Taint easy!

                    I like the idea of making good welds, so you have something to shoot for. If your welds don't match the perfect weld, then practice till they do. I know you would like an answer to :"what am I doing wrong?" or "Why doesn't my weld look like that?" The answer has been and still is, I'm afraid: "Practice, practice, practice!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As a hobby welder I have stuck at lot of stuff together with my GTAW rig. I have looked at a lot of pictures, read several books, practiced doing the wrong things for years and finally signed up for a $250 class at the local JVS. Different folks have different ways of learning. That said, a class with realtime feedback has been the best $250 I have spent on my hobby in a long time. I am half way thru the class and my welds are a little better but my knowledge of what I am doing wrong is vastly (some would say half vastly improved.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rocky D


                        Gnewby, I did just what you ask for my company, once. We had 25 weldors who were have difficulty getting their parts through inspection, so they asked me to do a pictoral of various types of rejectable heliarc welds on .064" plates.

                        They wanted to see undercut, cold lap, pin holes, and some others. The one I liked best was tungsten inclusion...I got the puddle going and then jammed the tungsten through the plate and cut the current! It looked like an arrow had gone through it!

                        They mounted the plates on a piano hinge, so you could see both sides of the plates and posted it in the middle of the shop, where everyone had access to it. They also made a booklet of pictures that each weldor was required to keep.

                        That was an extremely difficult thing for me to do, was to make bad welds on purpose. Dan will find that out too. Once you've spent years trying to make perfect welds, it just goes against the very synapses of your mind to do wrong. You set the controls too hot, or too cold, but your hand actually finds a way to make it look good subconsciously. Taint easy!

                        I like the idea of making good welds, so you have something to shoot for. If your welds don't match the perfect weld, then practice till they do. I know you would like an answer to :"what am I doing wrong?" or "Why doesn't my weld look like that?" The answer has been and still is, I'm afraid: "Practice, practice, practice!"


                        OK sounds like I struck out with another one of my brainstorms. I just kept thinking as I was looking at some of the welds you and Dan were showing that one picture is worth a thousand words. The qualatiy of your welding photos is awsome.
                        It does sound neat to me though that the company you work for had a similar idea once.
                        I understand where you are coming from with what you said about how difficult it would be for you to be able to make bad welds.

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