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Advice requested for removeable mount for reloading press

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  • Advice requested for removeable mount for reloading press

    I would like to mount my reloading press in photo to the workbench, but I don't want the press up there all the time. The workbench is one the Sams club type with hardwood maple top. I put the 1/2" aluminum plate on top.

    I have attached two photos. One of press in position I want to mount it and with the other photo showing the bottom of the workbench surface.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Not sure how much force gets transferred from the tool to the bench in use, but I'd think that with 1/2" Al, you could just drill and tap four holes in the plate and just bolt /unbolt the press. If that wasn't enough, I'd perhaps get a small plate of 1/8" steel and weld 4 nuts to it and attach it under the 1/2" Al, with holes drilled through the Al. You'd have to relieve the bucher block surface underneath somewhat though, to keep the table level.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Vector View Post
      Not sure how much force gets transferred from the tool to the bench in use, but I'd think that with 1/2" Al, you could just drill and tap four holes in the plate and just bolt /unbolt the press. If that wasn't enough, I'd perhaps get a small plate of 1/8" steel and weld 4 nuts to it and attach it under the 1/2" Al, with holes drilled through the Al. You'd have to relieve the bucher block surface underneath somewhat though, to keep the table level.

      Good ideas. I've got some other 1/2" aluminum so I drill and tape a hole for a bolt and see how tight I can get it without stripping.

      As far as the idea with the plate and welding the bolts I like that, but I'm thinking that would not work because the support for the top under the table would be in the way. Would it be in the way of the plate?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ron in SC View Post
        As far as the idea with the plate and welding the bolts I like that, but I'm thinking that would not work because the support for the top under the table would be in the way. Would it be in the way of the plate?
        I was thinking under the Aluminum, but on top of the wood, hence having to route out some wood to clear the plate & nuts. I suspect though, for the amount of force needed (just visualizing here because I've never worked a reloader), that tapping the 1/2" plate will work just fine.

        Of course, it depends on the Aluminum too. Any idea what grade the plate is? Looks dull enough to be one of the harder grades, but it's always hard to tell in a photo.

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        • #5
          Some people bolt the press to a plate and then c-clamp that to the benchtop when in use. You could go one better by adding a vertical piece to the front edge of the plate that comes down and touches the table leg. That would help prevent rocking.
          --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

          Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
          -------------------------
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          Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Vector View Post
            I was thinking under the Aluminum, but on top of the wood, hence having to route out some wood to clear the plate & nuts. I suspect though, for the amount of force needed (just visualizing here because I've never worked a reloader), that tapping the 1/2" plate will work just fine.

            Of course, it depends on the Aluminum too. Any idea what grade the plate is? Looks dull enough to be one of the harder grades, but it's always hard to tell in a photo.


            It’s T6061 structural aircraft aluminum.

            I tapped and drilled a piece of the aluminum for a 6mm x 1.0mm bolt, the size to go through the press. I then tighten the bolt incrementally until I stripped the thread in the hole. Bolt can be tightened safely to 12.5 ft. lbs. I stripped at 15.5 ft. lbs. I would probably only tighten to about 8 or 9 ft. lbs if it feels tight and secure.

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            • #7
              If you want to go into threaded holes in the plate and are worried about stripping, just put a 6 x 1.0 helicoil in each location, you won't yank those threads out in normal use.

              Or, use the idea that people here have posted to mount vises and benders to welding tables - make a mounting plate with a piece of 2x2 sq tubing welded to the bottom of it, and mount a piece of hitch receiver tube under the table to slide it into.
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              • #8
                There's a whole vast array of the 'well nut, nutsert, T-nuts' out there that would do the job. You could embed these nuts in the maple and use the hard black allen bolts to bolt it down. Keep the allen T handle as part of your standard reloading kit. The compression style inserts require some thought for sturdiness, wear and mating to the type of wood you have. Some of the T-nuts even have tiny holes for bradding them in place on the bottom. Some of the inserts have a coarse wood thread on the outside, go inplace with a square or allen type wrench but are threaded through for bolting. These take quite a large hole for installation. Ideal tho if the wood is to be topped after the inserts are placed as the holes can be through drilled to the smaller receving size after installation.

                Of course you end up with holes in the top when nothing is mounted, but I found that small debris falls through or can be cleaned out easily. If you want a slick top, remove all the items and you have a smooth top with reasonably precision holes is all.

                I made a series of holes like this for changing from shotgun to hard cartridge, powder charges, case trimmers, etc.
                Last edited by Sandy; 03-14-2009, 01:50 PM.

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                • #9
                  I found that a 6mm bolt that's grade 8.8 can be torqued to 7 ft. lbs. I believe I can easily apply that amount of torque to the bolts in the 1/2" aluminum top, since I did not strip the threads in the test I did until I applied 15.5 ft. lbs.

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                  • #10
                    There's been discussions on various boards using a hitch receiver to mount a vise.
                    You could do the same.
                    Mount the receiver tube to the underside of the table.
                    Bolt your press to a flat plate welded to the male tube.

                    When not using the press the receiver can also be used for whatever other
                    'temporary' tools you want to mount there, vise, grinder, sharpener, etc,

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chuck U&R View Post
                      There's been discussions on various boards using a hitch receiver to mount a vise.
                      You could do the same.
                      Mount the receiver tube to the underside of the table.
                      Bolt your press to a flat plate welded to the male tube.

                      When not using the press the receiver can also be used for whatever other
                      'temporary' tools you want to mount there, vise, grinder, sharpener, etc,
                      Thats what I was thinking, I have seen them on other boards. very quick switch out if needed.

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                      • #12
                        I tapped holes in the aluminum and the press is plenty solid.

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                        • #13
                          Dat's a perty Dillon XL650 you have there! I missed this thread, but might recommend some anti-seize on the threads!

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