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Welding Rebar

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  • Royal Fe
    replied
    Thanks Dave....
    ..pnj
    The top and the middle shelves are the same size. I put the rebar leg under the top, flush in the corner, and it runs to the outside corner of the middle shelf.

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  • pnj
    replied
    Royal Fe
    how did you taper the legs on that night stand? they look great.

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  • Dave Haak
    replied
    Royal Fe,

    "AirCare" very impressive!

    Dave

    Also the "Royal Fe (iron)_".
    Last edited by Dave Haak; 10-15-2003, 07:19 AM.

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  • Royal Fe
    replied
    Another rebar project. Lots more at this link under Photo Albums.

    Get the latest in news, entertainment, sports, weather and more on Currently.com. Sign up for free email service with AT&T Yahoo Mail.


    Last edited by Royal Fe; 10-14-2003, 08:44 AM.

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  • Royal Fe
    replied
    Yes, you can weld rebar. I do it on almost everything I make, tables, chairs, hand rails, yard art, fire pits, and the list goes on. I use an AC machine with 6011 and 7018. I haven't used my mig on it much but when I have its worked great. Some pictures to help.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Roger is right, folks...I wouldn't use rebar for anything structural. The mantle I made would probably not hold up a car engine.
    For fencing or grates in BBQ's it's good but not for roll cages.

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  • Roger
    Guest replied
    Some rebar is specified weldable most small rebar is not specified weldable. If it isn't supose to be weldable they can use what steel they have that meets strength requirment which might be brittle after welding. Most small rebar welds ok. Try test welding sample before buying a lot of rebar for welding project.

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  • Jim314
    replied
    Cletrac
    Just like KenCo, I've welded rebar too, for almost 3 weeks now Seems to weld ok for me. Of course, my welds don't look as good as Rocky D's, but I'm working on it.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    This is what it became

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    This is 1 1/2" rebar welded with a HH90 ER71T-11 fluxcore. .035 wire.

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  • KenCo
    replied
    Cletrac, unless I've been doing something wrong, I've welded muchos and muchos ( that means alot !) rebar of all sizes. As far as bending it, it really needs to be heated with a torch. The one thing I have found when welding rebar is that ,in not so technical terms, it melts quicker than regular mild steel, but, it is weldable, you just have to practice. When I say heated with a torch to bend, I mean heat until the rebar is glowing white, it'll bend like butter. Just be careful, I've still got a scar on my abdomen from a slipup last year.

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  • bitternut
    replied
    I welded up some climbing sticks for deer hunting using 1" square tubing and 5/8" rebar. I later found out that I had done a no no because you should not weld regular rebar. I took some left over rebar and welded up some test pieces for destructive testing. I welded them using my HH175 and .035 NR-211 flux core wire. All samples passed the 8# sledge test with flying colors. It worked for me that time but I guess maybe I was just lucky on the material that I had. It depends on the the carbon, manganese and carbon equivalent of the rebar. I guess I would try it and see how well it stood up to destructive testing. Here is some info I found on weldable rebar.



    Technical Info - Weldable A-706
    The "weldability" of steel, which is established by its chemical analysis, sets the minimum preheat and interpass temperatures, and limits the applicable welding procedures.
    Low-alloy steel reinforcing bars, conforming to the ASTM A706/A706M specification, are intended for welding. Weldability is accomplished in the specification by limits or controls on the chemical composition of the steel.

    One limit is on individual chemical elements, for example, carbon is limited to a maximum of 0.30% and manganese to a maximum of 1.50%. Another limit is on "carbon equivalent."

    The term "carbon equivalent," abbreviated as C.E., accounts for those chemical elements affecting weldability. The ASTM A706/A706M specification and the ANSI/AWS D1.4 Welding Code have the same formula for C.E.:



    C.E. = %C + %Mn/6 + %Cu/40 + %Ni/20 + %Cr/10 - %Mo/50 - %V/10

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  • Cletrac
    started a topic Welding Rebar

    Welding Rebar

    I am about to start building stall grills for our new barn using
    2 X 2 angle and 1/2" rebar. I'm told by my rebar supplier that rebar is not weldable but if I lay in a good bead all the way around it should be ok. Anyone had any experience with this?

    Thanks

    Dave
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