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  • farm wagon

    Has anyone made a farm wagon? The frames without wheels or a bed sell for $700, which is rediculous for what looks like a 2-weekend project.
    chasin' the $

  • #2
    Can't help with the wagon part, but my Grandpa, who is in his 80's, makes wagon wheels from scratch using railroad ties. Unbelievable.

    Slagman

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    • #3
      SLAGMAN..........DO YOU HAVE A DIGITAL CAMERA........ I WOULD LIKE TO SEE YOUR GRANDPA'S WAGON WHEELS........... I'M SERIOUS NOW...................ROCK
      [email protected] ... ONE MORE THING HAS HE EVER MADE ANY WOODEN BARRELS........?

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      • #4
        I have thought about using trailer axles with springs for the rear but have not come up with a good idea for a steerable front axle. The spindles are the holdup. I would like to build something that can do highway speeds.

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        • #5
          I'm a poor working man weekend farmer and really can't afford to spend anything on my "hobby". Recently I found an abandoned 2-bottom plow out in the woods and plowed some land. Then I walked the railroad tracks and picked up about 75 spikes. I had some scrap channel and angle that I had salvaged and I made a spike drag with those spikes. I planted some rye. I want to grow hay, and I need a wagon to transport it.

          I dislike the smiley faces. I liked the old format better.
          chasin' the $

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          • #6
            Rock, I have a wagon wheel of his sitting in my front yard as part of the landscaping. I don't have a digital camera, but I am on the end of a roll of film in my camera, so I will take a picture and scan it for you and post it, (give me a couple days here). If you mean barrels as in barrels for water, then no he doesn't. These are pretty neat. I just wish he didn't move 400 miles away.

            Slagman

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            • #7
              Your wanting to build 4 wheel trailer with steerable frount wheels.
              You want frount axle from 2 wheel drive 5 ton or larger truck. They still have a drop beam center section and kingpin steering. Everything smaller has independant frount suspension. Find at truck junkyard.

              About only used smaller steerable frount axle is off 4X4. IS not legal to use on highway for trailer if axle has differential.

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              • #8
                farm wagons

                Mike b,
                If you need a trailer/wagon,look for a copy of 'The Lancaster Farmer', It is from Pennsylvania, but has a lot of stuff in it from Maryland also. I bought a Gehl(brand name) hay wagon for $ 250.00, and only needed to put one tire on it, every thing else was in good shape.

                Donb,
                Highway speeds for a 4 wheel steering front axel trailer are about 35 mph max, and then only on straight,level road.
                Because of the front steering axel, they can become unstable rather easily. Wagons with spring suspension tend to become unstable at even lower speeds.

                btw, 5 ton axels would be massive overkill , but would mostlikely never break.

                The running gear from '50s and early '60's pickup trucks is about the right size, get two straight front axels, use them front and rear, connect tie rod to wagon tongue on front
                axel, and it will steer. Fix rear axel tie rod in place. If you want to get fancy you can put a parking brake on the rear axel, just remove brake backing plates on rear, and use plates from the rear of the pickup, connect parking brake cables to hand lever mounted under bed at front.

                For a weekend farmer, it's probably eaiser to get a wagon thats already made and fix it up a bit.
                Growing up in farm country, I've made wagons both ways, how much is your time worth?
                work safe, always wear your safety glasses.


                Edward Heimbach

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                • #9
                  I restored an antique cast iron tire shrinker once. It had 2 toothed dogs connected to cantilevered handles. The hot steel tire sat in a curved channel and got stretched taut over the wheel before welding I think. I never used it, but talked to an old time blacksmith who did. He said he got the steel white hot dripping wet, covered both ends with borax and hammered them together. A lot of books say forge welds can be done at lower heats, but I never had any success with it.
                  chasin' the $

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                  • #10
                    Mike B,

                    Had reason to look at MD. map yesterday, realized that Salisbury is on the penninsula, most likely the farm paper I told you of won't be of much use there.
                    My appologies.
                    work safe, always wear your safety glasses.


                    Edward Heimbach

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                    • #11
                      farm wagon

                      I have made several wagons in the past using 1/2 and 3/4 ton pick-up frames with indepentdent front ends leaf or coil rears.
                      It is a small matter to fabricate a tounge mount on the front crossmember.I mounted a 3/4"thick plate to the tounge wich i drilled and reamed to accept the inner tie rod ends,this allows the front end to steer.I also made jack bolts which limit spring movement to make the wagon stable and reduce sway while loaded but still maintain a decent ride when empty on the road.I prefer the full coil spring set ups 3/4 ton Chevy ,Gmc from the 60s they are plentiful , cheap and a very solid frame to work with.On the 3/4 ton rears you can pull the axle shafts out and make a cover plate to replace them and pack the bearings with wheel bearing grease instead of relying on the splash lube of the 80/90gear lube.I doubt you would ever overload it hauling hay.
                      Good Luck
                      Terrance

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