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  • jeff-
    replied
    Ha guy's this is what I have been concerned about this whole thread, gas impurity's and so on, there are companies and manufacturers of commercial ovens and pits out there that build there units that utilize the heat from the gas and then direct the burnt gases away from the food, so hence the need to build smart, I have worked in this field many years now and I know if a burner is not burning correctly it will make a person sick.

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  • Northweldor
    replied
    Originally posted by urch55 View Post
    Darth,
    Lets not forget the rats that may show up to eat the scraps or lick off the grating. Rats do thier business every place so you have to heat the cooking chamber up to burn off any rat residue or "trace elements".
    This is why it is a good idea to wash off a soda/beer can before drinking. Rat wizz is hazardous to your health.
    We only worry about deer mice in rat-free Alberta!

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  • urch55
    replied
    Darth,
    Lets not forget the rats that may show up to eat the scraps or lick off the grating. Rats do thier business every place so you have to heat the cooking chamber up to burn off any rat residue or "trace elements".
    This is why it is a good idea to wash off a soda/beer can before drinking. Rat wizz is hazardous to your health.

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  • urch55
    replied
    No problem with "trace elements" here.
    I always burn a few pallets to clean out the cooking chamber. The LP tanks get red hot. It also makes it nice to clean the exterior and paint it. At least I know how clean the cooker is but I can't say that about the meat.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by smokerJJ View Post
    I'm using a 300 gal fuel oil tank for a smoker and a smaller hot water heater tank for a fire box i was looking for a burner like the one you put on i love it and just had some questions about modification the design to fit my needs. first i have a hole in my smoker from the drain that is at the bottom it would fit a 3/4 pipe not a 1" pipe would that make a difference in what you would need for a regulator and the holes you need to drill. second my smoker is about 6 ft long i would love to run it most of the way 4ft or 5ft of pipe for supplement heat in the pic i have seen they don't look that long can i make it longer or do i need to change something. I'm going to post some pics of my smoker and set up
    thanks

    Ok, again, not trying to start anything...but isnt fuel oil infused with all sorts of trace elements that would be considered "unhealthy" if ingested? My point in this thread is that it seems to me that a few people may have great ideas and aspirations for projects.....but when it comes to choosing what to use....not so good an idea.

    Here in Texas, we are famous for our BBQ cookers. I believe we are even given title to a type or design of BBQ cooker. As such, I have seen MANY of these that were made from things I wouldn't ever think of using. Old gas tanks, fuel cells, pipe of unknown origin. It doesnt matter; in my book, if you arent 100% positive that the metal is fresh/new.....you dont use it for ANYTHING to do with food or potable water.

    We are all adults....Ok, most of us are, and we can all make up our own minds as to what we will do to our bodies. The problem though, is that " if " you build a cooker out of some dangerously toxic materials....and then feed others out of that cooker; they never had the chance to make that choice.
    If you understand how hard it is to get impurities out of metal so that it will weld well......just imagine how hard it is to get impurities out of metal so that it is safe to cook with ?!

    Again, not trying to start a fight....but I will say this... When choosing materials to use for the construction of any cooking device....MAKE SURE ITS CLEAN. And washing out oilfield pipe with dish soap and a water hose...ISNT CLEAN.

    Be safe my friends....and be healthy.

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  • Northweldor
    replied
    Originally posted by darthwelder View Post
    Question.....I see in several pics what looks like galvanized metal being used to make parts to be used in the cooker.

    Now, I am no expert on the science of metallurgy, but, aren't the coatings used in making galvan zinc and tin? If so, wouldn't using that type of metal in a COOKING vessel be dangerous? I know stainless and copper is safe, along with cast iron. But once the flame of natural gas hits the elements in the galvanized metals....wouldnt there be some kind of transfer of the zinc and tin, and whatever else....INTO the food? Also, I know Im gonna kill the spelling of this, but isnt "fazz-gene" gas released as a result of high heat being applied to galvanized metal? ( please feel free to correct my spelling, Im good, but not perfect.)

    Im not trying to start a fight here, there is enough of that going on already on this BBS, but it does come to mind that certain metals or coatings should be avoided for food prep.

    If Im wrong....no biggie, Ill learn something. But If Im right, be careful... I wouldnt want to hear of someone being sick or hurt over this.
    The correct spelling is "phosgene" , and I don't think it is produced in heating galvanized coatings. What is produced is vaporized zinc oxide which is harmful if inhaled but is also an additive in trace amounts in many food products. You are correct that zinc plating should not be used in cooking, possibly because of the cadmium contamination mentioned above.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Copper pots for years have been lined (plated) with Tin inside and used for cooking they were relined with Tin when old Tin wore off.

    The real problem, Zinc is often contaminated with small amounts of Cadmium which is toxic. Drinking water has been collected from galvanized steel roofing on pacific islands for years before and after Cadmium hazards were known.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadmium_poisoning

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Question about the mats I see you using.

    Question.....I see in several pics what looks like galvanized metal being used to make parts to be used in the cooker.

    Now, I am no expert on the science of metallurgy, but, aren't the coatings used in making galvan zinc and tin? If so, wouldn't using that type of metal in a COOKING vessel be dangerous? I know stainless and copper is safe, along with cast iron. But once the flame of natural gas hits the elements in the galvanized metals....wouldnt there be some kind of transfer of the zinc and tin, and whatever else....INTO the food? Also, I know Im gonna kill the spelling of this, but isnt "fazz-gene" gas released as a result of high heat being applied to galvanized metal? ( please feel free to correct my spelling, Im good, but not perfect.)

    Im not trying to start a fight here, there is enough of that going on already on this BBS, but it does come to mind that certain metals or coatings should be avoided for food prep.

    If Im wrong....no biggie, Ill learn something. But If Im right, be careful... I wouldnt want to hear of someone being sick or hurt over this.

    Leave a comment:


  • boykjo
    replied
    Originally posted by benkapitanec View Post
    I am new to this forum and have been following all the threads to the pipe burner build instructions. I am in the process of building two pig cookers out of old fuel oil tanks. The tanks/cooker sits upright just as it would if it were holding fuel oil (on its legs), the cookers are about 70% complete and I am at a point where I am begining to make the burner. There is alot of good information on this build from everyone, the most important is to build it right and to build it safe! My question, and this is to anyone who has made an upright cooker...How high off the bottom of the tank did you mount your burner assembly and have you had any issues of grease fire/flare-ups while cooking your hogs. While I do have a hole drilled at the base of the tank to drain run-off of grease, there is still alot of grease coming off the hog while it's roasting. If you mount the pipe burner too close to the bottom of the tank you risk catching the grease on fire. Your advise is appreciated.

    3 inches................. no grease fires or flare ups .......... I would drill another hole at the other end of the cooker to allow grease to drain when your cooker is on unlevel ground and pitched in either direction and also to add 02 into the cooker so your burner will stay lit. I have a 2 inch hole drilled at each end on the bottom side of the drum
    Last edited by boykjo; 01-29-2011, 11:55 AM. Reason: add info

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  • jeff-
    replied
    Originally posted by benkapitanec View Post
    I'm not deep frying the hog, I'm roasting. The hog will be placed on a rotiserrie that will be motorized or manual, I havent decided yet. That being said, I was looking for advice on correct placement of the burner. How far off the bottom of the tank should it be placed with-out catching any grease on fire? Also, I'm confused as to the different approaches to the burner build, specifically the venturi. Some are drilling 4 holes in the pipe cap and others are using a bell reducer. If you use the bell reducer where do you place the vent holes?
    Different approach entirely, if you look at an L.P. gas pit such as you could buy at home depot you will notice the burner is mounted on the inside of the pit and the bottom of the pit is cut out [this is for secondary air for the burner to burn correctly], primary air flows into the burner by way of the bell reducer gas is directed through the bell reducer from the large end first then to the small end [at this point gas mixes with air and flows through the pipe] as mixture reaches the outside surface of the pipe it is ignited and the flame sits on the surface of the pipe at the holes or slots cut in the pipe. The bell reducer should be outside the pit and the body of the burner will be inside the pit, the burner being protected in one of two ways, holes or slots cut in the burner will point to the bottom of the pit or they can face up with angle iron above the burner to keep grease and debris from plugging burner up. If you need more info click on my name, go to my profile and look at the post I made for a better burner, this will explain much of how a burner works, hope this clears up the confusion, Jeff.

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  • Northweldor
    replied
    Originally posted by benkapitanec View Post
    I'm not deep frying the hog, I'm roasting. The hog will be placed on a rotiserrie that will be motorized or manual, I havent decided yet. That being said, I was looking for advice on correct placement of the burner. How far off the bottom of the tank should it be placed with-out catching any grease on fire? Also, I'm confused as to the different approaches to the burner build, specifically the venturi. Some are drilling 4 holes in the pipe cap and others are using a bell reducer. If you use the bell reducer where do you place the vent holes?
    You need to know that those are not vent holes. They are inlet holes for the oxygen that will be drawn in and mixed with the fuel gas, IF you have a Venturi effect built into your burner. The bell reducer can be part of the Venturi effect with the drilled holes allowing the air(oxygen) to enter. Check the Bernouli principle ( part of the Venturi effect).

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  • benkapitanec
    replied
    Burner placement

    I'm not deep frying the hog, I'm roasting. The hog will be placed on a rotiserrie that will be motorized or manual, I havent decided yet. That being said, I was looking for advice on correct placement of the burner. How far off the bottom of the tank should it be placed with-out catching any grease on fire? Also, I'm confused as to the different approaches to the burner build, specifically the venturi. Some are drilling 4 holes in the pipe cap and others are using a bell reducer. If you use the bell reducer where do you place the vent holes?

    Leave a comment:


  • jeff-
    replied
    Originally posted by benkapitanec View Post
    I am new to this forum and have been following all the threads to the pipe burner build instructions. I am in the process of building two pig cookers out of old fuel oil tanks. The tanks/cooker sits upright just as it would if it were holding fuel oil (on its legs), the cookers are about 70% complete and I am at a point where I am begining to make the burner. There is alot of good information on this build from everyone, the most important is to build it right and to build it safe! My question, and this is to anyone who has made an upright cooker...How high off the bottom of the tank did you mount your burner assembly and have you had any issues of grease fire/flare-ups while cooking your hogs. While I do have a hole drilled at the base of the tank to drain run-off of grease, there is still alot of grease coming off the hog while it's roasting. If you mount the pipe burner too close to the bottom of the tank you risk catching the grease on fire. Your advise is appreciated.

    If you are frying in lard or grease you need a way to control the temperature of the grease and keep it at 400 degrees F., that is a good all around temp to fry anything. Grease will flash and catch fire around 500 to 550 degrees F., depending on if it is vegetable or animal fat, if the grease catches fire you do not want to try to put it out with water, the water will turn to steam and cause the grease to splash up and boil over and could severely hurt someone. As to burner spacing it should be between 4" to 6" from the bottom of the tank, it really depends on the B.T.U. of the burner. Two words of caution, do not have the burner on with no grease in the tank if you do it will warp and crack the bottom of the tank witch will cause a fire and do not use any brass in pipe drain or filter system, this will cause a type of poison to form and contaminate the grease, could make someone very sick or kill someone, just things to avoid, hope this helps, Jeff.

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  • benkapitanec
    replied
    New to Forum

    I am new to this forum and have been following all the threads to the pipe burner build instructions. I am in the process of building two pig cookers out of old fuel oil tanks. The tanks/cooker sits upright just as it would if it were holding fuel oil (on its legs), the cookers are about 70% complete and I am at a point where I am begining to make the burner. There is alot of good information on this build from everyone, the most important is to build it right and to build it safe! My question, and this is to anyone who has made an upright cooker...How high off the bottom of the tank did you mount your burner assembly and have you had any issues of grease fire/flare-ups while cooking your hogs. While I do have a hole drilled at the base of the tank to drain run-off of grease, there is still alot of grease coming off the hog while it's roasting. If you mount the pipe burner too close to the bottom of the tank you risk catching the grease on fire. Your advise is appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • g8trwood
    replied
    My burner experiences are this,

    Currently I currently have two burners in my smoker, 1 1/4 inside diameter with a 2" bell for the venturi, the pipes are 40" long. I started my slots 10" from the venturi and ended 4" from the end of the pipe, my slots were made with a portaband saw and are the depth of the blade, 1/2, and spaced every 3/4 of an inch. I used a .063 (1/16th) venturi hole, when I stepped up to a 3/32 hole, I had a yellow flame as I had too much gas. In most cases of homemade burners, I have found that people have too large of an orifice hole and have a yellow flame. I find the bandsaw to be the easiest way to make the holes and it gives a great flame. I use a low pressure regulator to operate both burners.

    WARNING: For smokers you need to either have a thermal couple that will turn off your gas supply if the flame goes out or some type of air holes in the bottom where the unburned gas can go so that it does not go into the fire box which means BOOM. If you get too much smoke in the cooking area, the smoke puts out the flame and then either you open the door and BOOM as O2 is introduced or the gas goes into the firebox and BOOM. There are a lot of stories of kabooms on the bbq forums, please be careful!

    For those reasons, I won't lend my smoker to anyone. I now have my air inlet into the firebox locked down so that it cannot be opened enough to put out the burners. Great thread, just read as much as you can and be careful.

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