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  • Quarter Panels

    Guys, I fully admit I'm clueless in how to go about this...

    Have any of you ever replaced the quarter panels on a 1969 Nova SS? I have never done this or seen it done. I do know that warpage can be a big problem along with not getting the metal 100% aligned correctly. What would be the best way to go about this?
    4wd trucks are my current life... along with my animals

    "One day, 4wd trucks shall rule the world..."

  • #2
    Body Work

    Cut out bad portion of metal, leaving about an inch for panel over lap. Grind away all paint in area about 2" from where weld will be. Attach new metal with self drilling sheet metal screws (through both pieces of steel, About 1/4" from edge). Weld in new metal with.023 dia. flux core. (This is standard body shop wire). Weld about an Inch skip 6 inches weld another inch skip 6 inches, ect. Go back to beginning and weld and skip untill the seam is complete. (Skip welding limits heat input in any one area, so warpage isn't that big of a problem).Remove screws and weld up screw holes. Lightly grind seam with 32 grit sanding disk,just to knock the high spots off. Mud over seam with Dynaglass, or some other waterproof filler, and refinish.
    steelhanger

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    • #3
      auto body

      Steelhanger,

      Is the new sheet metal on the inside or on the outside finish surface? Seems like either way, a lap joint is left with one side open on the inside. '

      Thanks for the input. I have a '73 Bug project car this might help with. Mine in the "look good and work good" class, not for shows.

      I guess I took 4-by's question to mean a total panel replacement rather than a localized repair? Could be wrong?

      Total panel replacement would seem like spot welding seems for show, or sheet metal screws just to get it installed and look right.
      Maybe welding some thin backing plates for the fasteners.

      I remember the 69 Nova SS when it was new ... but I don't remember it with a 4-by option.

      Bob

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      • #4
        Welding question

        Would it be better to weld it from the inside seeing how we have all the interior removed (along with almost everything else from the body)? I don't think the weld would show (I told you I'm clueless about anything to do with autobody except painting and paint prep) but would the seam be smooth enough it wouldn't show after paint?

        Thanks,
        4-by Girl
        Last edited by Four by Girl; 10-13-2002, 09:49 PM.
        4wd trucks are my current life... along with my animals

        "One day, 4wd trucks shall rule the world..."

        Comment


        • #5
          The Rust Bucket

          Bob,
          The Nova hasn't and won't be hacked into a 4-by. (I hate seeing old iron 'molested') We're (several of my numerous male associations and I) are in the process of removing the old, nasty rusted out quarter panels and doing an insane amount of work on the car so we will be able to compete at the drag strips with it in May of next year. I'm in the process of removing rusted out panels (compliments of the Great Rust Belt) so we can move on to bigger and better things (the mechanical end ). Of course, to save weight and pain and suffering, we could always use a fiberglass body...but the budget indicates most of it shall go into the engine and tranny. It will, for the most part, be a trailer queen. We do plan on showing her. I can't wait for her to hit the road for the idiot drivers to have a shot at putting a ding on the body for the few times it will be off the trailer or not sitting in my shop and or garage.

          Thank you guys
          4-by Girl
          Last edited by Four by Girl; 10-13-2002, 10:37 PM.
          4wd trucks are my current life... along with my animals

          "One day, 4wd trucks shall rule the world..."

          Comment


          • #6
            Ah, a race car!

            You might want to try just using fiberglass for the repairs to save weight. With the panels off the car you can grind around the damage on both sides to get good bonding. PEP boys, JC Whitney, and the like have starter kits and supplies.

            Comment


            • #7
              BOB
              If you can get to the area from the inside, then weld from there, that way the open seam can be sealed with the filler(water proof, like dynaglass or tigerhair). an other hint is to make new seam in an area where body panel abruptly changes contour, this way you can bury the seam in the filler and not be to picky about appearances, cause it's getting covered anyway.
              steelhanger

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              • #8
                FOUR BY GIRL......... HAD A 1965 SS ON TIME AND MY PANEL'S RUSTED OUT.............. BEFORE I GOT INTO WELDING JUST A KID THEN......I USED A CARDBOARD BOX FOR THE FRAME OF THE INNER FENDERWELL AND FILLED IT UP WITH BONDO...... LASTED ABOUT 1 YEAR....... HIT THE RAIL ROAD TRACKS AND A BIG GOB OF BONDO FELL OUT FROM UNDER THE CAR.............HAHAHA..... ... I THEN HAD SOMEONE WELD IT UP FOR ME.............. LASTED A LOT LONGER.......... BUT ON THE OTHERSIDE OF THE COIN IS THE FACT THAT NOW A DAYS THEY HAVE TIGER HAIR BONDO, FIBERGLASS RESIN, AND JUST A WHOLD LOT OF NICER THINGS TO WORK WITH THAN WHEN I WAS YOUNG............. ANYWAY'S YOU GOT SOME IDEA'S........ AND ARE ABOUT TO HAVE SOME FUN............... BE SAFE OUT THERE NOW..................ROCK[email protected]

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                • #9
                  4 by girl, I'm into two projects that require sheet metal work. I have plenty of sheet metal handy from donor cars but it is time consuming pulling the panels off but I'm conviced that replacing the entire panel is the way to go if you got time on your hands. I just purchased a 115V Air cooled spot welder. We'll see how it works vs the MIG. It's only good up to 1/8" but should be enough for two panels. Anything thicker, the MIG can handle. I did a patch on the floor and it came out real well with the MIG. I left a .30 gap and filled in with a .35 flux core. It wasn't pretty on the bottom so I welded the bottom to fill in before grinding the top weld to give some insurance that I wouldn't burn thru. I'm sure you could do the same if you have access on the inside to weld the outer panel but I don't think it would be necessary because the weld wouldn't be visable after the interior is back in.

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                  • #10
                    Steelhanger,

                    Thanks for the update. I think I have the picture now. New metal is on the inside, welded from the inside. Then we fiberglass over the outside to seal the lap joint. Resin and if possible fiber get into the cracks of the lap joint from the outside for super good adheasion.

                    Question: What if I tack some glass cloth on the inside with resin before I screw, then weld, the new metal on from the inside. Concept is to insure I have glass under the old metal. How would the glass cloth take the welding heat?

                    Bob

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Four by Girl, follow steelhangers advice, get replacement panel as close to perfect fit as possible, some parts of the replacement panels will be flanged for a lap weld others may require a butt weld, after panel is attached temporary with screws or pop rivets begin tack welding, secure entire panel with tacks moving back and forth around the panel to distribute the heat evenly. My advice here would be to continue in this manner untill the panel is completly welded in. (the time you might save stitch welding may come back to haunt you when your pounding out those warped panels with a hammer and dolly) TIPS if you have an air compressor, after each weld a couple of short blasts of air will cool the metal and help speed the process with less warpage.
                      On the butt welds a piece of copper is sometimes helpful when used as a backing plate (copper conducts electrcity, the weld will not stick to it) use to bridge small voids or to fill small holes.
                      Take your time grinding the welds down, this will create a lot of heat and could cause the panel to warp. The main thing to remember is to take your time and don't get carried away!! I will try to post some pictures of some panel replacements I have done on a 69 chevelle in a few days.

                      Tim

                      ps. don't waste your time trying to do the welds from the backside of the panel, two thirds of them you won't be able to get to, and if the panel is flanged that leaves an unsecured seam on the out side that after a day or two in the sun will cause the filler to crack from the metal expanding and contracting. Hope all this info is of some help

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bob
                        Steelhanger,

                        Thanks for the update. I think I have the picture now. New metal is on the inside, welded from the inside. Then we fiberglass over the outside to seal the lap joint. Resin and if possible fiber get into the cracks of the lap joint from the outside for super good adheasion.

                        Question: What if I tack some glass cloth on the inside with resin before I screw, then weld, the new metal on from the inside. Concept is to insure I have glass under the old metal. How would the glass cloth take the welding heat?

                        Bob
                        You'd most likely have a fire that would be tough to put out!!! Low flash point on the resin....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd say if you don't want to take the time to butt weld the joint and want to flange the new metal then I would use body Shultz (sp) on the back side to seal the seam after your done. They used it on the trunk pans before installing the carpet on my Firebirds. Heck, I bet you could even run down to the Autozone and pick up some under coating. It's half the cost.

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                          • #14
                            hey bob i'm back

                            BOB,
                            I was away on a job last three days, could not respond. Rock is right, the polystyrene resin has a real low ignition point, and stinks like you wouldn't believe when burning.
                            Don' get fancy, just weld and fill. By the time it rots out again in another ten years, someone will have invented a better way to repair body rot. If you are doing total panel repair, drilling out spot welds, and spotting new back in is the only way to go.
                            I spent 15 years working in a fast paced auto body shop,then the fumes and the dust got to me , I had to get back outside into the good air. Plenty of good air 25 stories up.
                            steelhanger

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                            • #15
                              So TIRED

                              Guys,

                              Well, the Nova has one less rusty quarter panel and new inner fenders on the passenger side as of 9 am today. It looks good enough, not perfect (as of yet) by any means but she is slowly getting there. Between work, farming, and work...the other one might get put on in about 4 years. It's not a good idea to weld one up after having no sleep for 4 straight days...
                              4wd trucks are my current life... along with my animals

                              "One day, 4wd trucks shall rule the world..."

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