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Wiring Shop Lights

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  • Wiring Shop Lights

    I have some multi-voltage (120/240/208/277) shop lights I'm putting up that were wired 120. They used the yellow (not labled) for net. Do I use the yellow as one line for 240 also? or use the 120 and 240 wires?
    T/A Fabricator 251
    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Homemade Hyd/Ele Press
    Ingersol T30
    TD Cutmaster 52

  • #2
    Are there 5 wires? EX: a Yellow wire and the rest are tagged 120v...208v...240v...277v?

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    • #3
      Yes, No other wires.
      T/A Fabricator 251
      Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
      Homemade Hyd/Ele Press
      Ingersol T30
      TD Cutmaster 52

      Comment


      • #4
        Then connect the neutral to the yellow and the hot to the wire tagged 120volt. Cap off the other wires. Dont forget to connect the ground wire when using romex. Also, use the correct wire/breaker size..ie:14ga/15amp...12ga/20amp..

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        • #5
          They were wired that way for120, I want to run them 240.
          T/A Fabricator 251
          Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
          Homemade Hyd/Ele Press
          Ingersol T30
          TD Cutmaster 52

          Comment


          • #6
            In a residence? I'd have to look it up but, i think you can only run 120 in a res.you can go 208 on up commercial.

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            • #7
              You can wire them what ever you want.

              If theres only two wire's, then its probably an electronic multi-tap ballast, should be able to hook up any where from 120-277.

              If theres more than two wires, and it uses a ballast, get the part number of the ballast and look it up online, should be able to find a wiring diagram.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TOMWELDS2 View Post
                In a residence? I'd have to look it up but, i think you can only run 120 in a res.you can go 208 on up commercial.
                At least in some cases 240 is allowable in a residence or all of the 1000W and 1500W, 240V halogen heads around here wouldn't have passed inspection.
                I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by enlpck View Post
                  At least in some cases 240 is allowable in a residence or all of the 1000W and 1500W, 240V halogen heads around here wouldn't have passed inspection.

                  Theres no reason why not, if you had 480/277 you could run your lights at what ever you wanted, as long as the fixture is UL listed for that particular voltage.

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                  • #10
                    They are HI-TEK high pressure sodium fixtures S51 ballast and yes the yellow is common for all voltages listed. Hung one up tonight on 240. My vaulted ceiling on 12 ft. walls looked high until I hung that light! Am going to have a number of floresent fixtures to go along with the HID's as they seem shadowy at that height. Maybe when I get the others up it will help.
                    T/A Fabricator 251
                    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
                    Homemade Hyd/Ele Press
                    Ingersol T30
                    TD Cutmaster 52

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Correct, in a residence you can't exceed 120 volts between conductors. If it's out in a shop I don't know how that would fit in though.

                      Keith
                      Hobart Champion 10,000
                      Montgomery Ward 230A stick
                      cheesy Century flux core wire feed

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kdredneck View Post
                        Correct, in a residence you can't exceed 120 volts between conductors. If it's out in a shop I don't know how that would fit in though.

                        Keith
                        Just out of curiosity do you have a NEC article to back that up?

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                        • #13
                          220 V?

                          Wouldn't that rule out kitchen ranges, ovens and dryer outlets on main floor or am I missing something here?
                          Jim Don

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JimDon View Post
                            Wouldn't that rule out kitchen ranges, ovens and dryer outlets on main floor or am I missing something here?
                            Jim Don
                            That would rule out your entire service feeding your house, you have 240/120V coming in.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Kdredneck View Post
                              Correct, in a residence you can't exceed 120 volts between conductors. If it's out in a shop I don't know how that would fit in though.

                              Keith
                              That would be 120V relative to the GROUNDED conductor, maybe? I would also like the NEC reference. Is this anywhere in a residence? Or only undedicated circuits? Other?

                              If this is the case, I know several people that have passed inspection just fine while violating this. It is pricey, but in some places not terribly so, to get three phase (240 delta or 480 wye) to a residence.
                              I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

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