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easiest way to convert stick welder to tig

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  • easiest way to convert stick welder to tig

    i've read all of the post about way's to convert ac to dc and got confused, i have a 70 amp ac stick welder and all that i'm going to use it for is stainless, i need the fastest and easiest way to go from ac to dc. i seen the pic's moody posted but the supplier needs
    more details, also need to know if a light dinner switch will control the amps?

    Thanks, Tim

  • #2
    Do you want to convert to tig, or convert to DC?

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    • #3
      To be straight here, its a waste of time and effort. Lots of energy and you are still left with a piece of scrap when you are finished, even if you could get it to work its life expectancy would be short.
      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Timn916 View Post
        i need the fastest and easiest way to go from ac to dc. i seen the pic's moody posted but the supplier needs more details
        Thanks, Tim
        I would say not happenen going from an AC only machine to DC,

        There are kits out there to convert to TIG, but I would seriously consider a "bigger" machine I don't know your experiance and what not but to my knowledge you can't just make a switch for AC into DC.

        Please correct me if I'm wrong.

        GT
        Last edited by gt403cyl; 06-22-2007, 01:23 AM.
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        • #5
          well why not just buy a stainless steel electrode for ac rather than try to make this all complicated
          it is always better to be long than to too short.

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          • #6
            i want to convert it to a dc tig welder, i have a miller ecmo tig but to big to carry on some job sites, so a 110 small tig would do the trick

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            • #7
              You could convert it to DC using four high current diodes with heat sinks.

              Do you know how to wire a full wave bridge?

              The following diagram shows how it would be done (bridge rectifier with LC filter).

              http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ic/rectbr.html

              You gan get diodes on ebone -- here's what I found searching for about two seconds (you need four diodes and an inductor if you welder does not already have the inductor):

              http://cgi.ebay.com/High-Power-Recti...QQcmdZViewItem

              It would be an experiment for sure. If you want a welder, buy one. If you want to experiment and don't mind the possible cost of failure of the experiment, I say go for it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by new_welder View Post
                You gan get diodes on ebone -- ............
                It would be an experiment for sure. ................If you want to experiment and don't mind the possible cost of failure of the experiment, I say go for it.

                That's a chuckle !
                sigpicViceGrip
                Negative people have a problem for every solution

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                • #9
                  Hi all, one thing must be realised when dealing with electronics and that is the manufacturers always quote the maximum power rating the device will handle.
                  This means you halve the ratings, for volts and amps, for workability, otherwise you're running the devices at top wank and this will lead to failure.
                  If you've got a conventional 100 Amp AC welder, you'll need diodes rated at 200 amps, and voltage above whatever the welder output is running at, probably 50 volts, so a rating of 100 volts is needed.
                  The big problem with converting a stick welder to do tig is the lack of HF, but more so is the lack of having a foot control.
                  Once you've had to live with scratch tig you'll in the end spit the dummy and lash out for one of those compact tig jobs that you can carry around.
                  However just converting a stick welder to do DC welding, by adding a diode bridge and an inductor, is like having all your birthdays at once, it's pure heaven.
                  Ian.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by billbong View Post
                    If you've got a conventional 100 Amp AC welder, you'll need diodes rated at 200 amps, and voltage above whatever the welder output is running at, probably 50 volts, so a rating of 100 volts is needed.
                    Not true....if you have 100 amp AC and want to use 4 diodes to "convert" the ac to dc then you will only need 50 amp diodes as they will share the load.....100 amps on the + side split between two diodes and 100 amps on the - side split between two diodes.......and I don't see why you'd need 100 v capacity to carry 50 volts......diodes that I deal with are mostly 300 / 600 volt anyway so the v isn't an issue.
                    Mike
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                    • #11
                      my advise is seein' as how you already want a half-assed welder (no offense), save the bux on converting and buy a low quality DC GTAW unit, Har-bore Freet, one upgrade to ArcOne, two upgrades? (it's a scratcher, but a name brand one at least) to Thermal Arc Dragster.

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                      • #12
                        My half-assed welder does the job for me. AC/DC, high freq, and foot pedal.

                        What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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                        • #13
                          it's 70 amp (campbell hausfeld) so i need 4 35 amp diodes? not sure how to wire it.
                          i guess some people are missing the point. i have a miller econo tig
                          and do on the job site stainless welding and customer not setup with 60 amp 220
                          becomes a problem. as far as starting it i'll be adding a stun gun as a starter.
                          any pic's will be helpfull.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pumpkinhead View Post
                            my advise is seein' as how you already want a half-assed welder (no offense), save the bux on converting and buy a low quality DC GTAW unit, Har-bore Freet, one upgrade to ArcOne, two upgrades? (it's a scratcher, but a name brand one at least) to Thermal Arc Dragster.
                            it's still 220 and i bought one and it sucked

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mike W View Post
                              My half-assed welder does the job for me. AC/DC, high freq, and foot pedal.

                              looks cool ta me. so can u switch from tig back to stick on that? i wish i knew how ta make somethin like that. why is it everybody wants dc tig ? just wonderin cause knew on dc stick it was easy ta start but i dont tig. does anybody know how to make a tig welder from a ac/dc stick welder? thought that might be easier if i was gonna make one for a trial run .
                              welding....its what i do

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