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  • Air Compressor Delivery

    I am looking to buy a minimum 60 gal vertical stationary air compressor. I want a Ingersoll Rand that will most likely require truck delivery to my house. My problem is that I have no way of transporting a 300+lb top heavy air compressor in packaging and on a palette from the street to my garage.

    I really can’t arrange things to have a few friends available at time of delivery. The distance from the street to my garage is about 100 feet, up a slight incline and would require traveling over two 2” thresholds.

    How’d you guys do it? I need this not only for my next plasma project, but for so other air powered tools required some good cfm. Thanks.

  • #2
    The compressor will be on a pallet and the truck will need a lift gate, Im sure with a pallet jack and some help steadying the compressor you could push it up most of your drive way, the driver probably wouldnt mind helping aswell.

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    • #3
      I have a 60gal IR upright (single stage) and its not too bad to move, but it is very top heavy. I've laid mine down to transport it with the oil drained--if you lay it down without draining the oil, it will drain itself--DAMHIKT. What about lying it on some type of cart? Even two furniture dollies would work, but not for going over 2" thresholds.

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      • #4
        My driver helped me

        get it off the pallet. That was the tuffie. He had a pallet jack that came in handy when moving it into position. You might consider getting a appliance hand truck, you can strap it on (use a piece of steel under the feet) and wheel it in. Its still heavy.

        Just a couple of ideas.

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        • #5
          I considered the pallet jack and the appliance hand truck from U-haul. I also considered laying the compressor flat and moving it that way.

          But I envision things happening this way. The truck shows up. The driver lift gates it down to the ground in the middle of the street. Then what? My only objective is to get this thing in my garage, or atleast to the curb ASAP. I live in a highly urbanize area.
          If I can tip this thing over and lay it flat, then I'd be in good shape. But I was never sure I could do that with the oil. If I (a 150 lbs skinny guy) can tip it over safely, then that would work. On the other hand, I would use the appliance hand truck but I still have to deal with the palette.

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          • #6
            I think I would go with a pallet jack. You can make a metal "bridge" to allow it to roll over the threshold.
            What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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            • #7
              Not knowing your specific layout, I'm not sure if this will work...but it worked for me when I needed to move my lathe and stand. Together they weigh in @ about 700lbs.
              I made a simple stepped ramp out of 3 layers of 1/2" OSB plywood on either side of the door threshold. Longer pieces on the bottom and progressively shorter ones on top until it was level with the top of the threshold. If you go this route, make sure that each upper layer is at least 2 inches shorter than the one below it, to give a ledge for the wheels to sit on before moving to the next one.

              Hope that helps!
              Dave
              HH187, TA 185 AC/DC Arcmaster, Hypertherm Powermax 380 Plasma
              Smithy 1220 LX Lathe
              Peter Wright 132 (198lbs) anvil
              Hoods: Jackson Nexgen and Hobart/Miller XLi
              Victor compatible med duty OA setup
              Chop Saw, 4x6 Band Saw

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              • #8
                I moved my 60gal IR on a standard dolly. Just shoved it under the pallet and tipped it back. The delivery guy helped me move it in the garage but I have since moved it around by myself. Granted I am a little taller and probably a bit younger than most but it was not all that difficult to move. It is still on the pallet by the way so I can't help you there. Worst case senerio, tip the driver a 20 and he will gladly put it in your garage.

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                • #9
                  I bought an IR 80 Gal, 2 stage. I used the front-end loader on a JD tractor to unload it off the truck (no lift gate) and to move it around into place. A word of caution regardless of what method you use; these things are verrry "top heavy" and bulky and that slight incline is certainly not going to help matters.
                  If I were you, I'd try to rent/borrow a pallet jack and build me something around those 2" thresholds so it will get it over em...... IMHO, It also going to take at least one other person to help ya. Two more would even be better....but I'm kinda old these days....

                  HH187
                  Stars & Stripes BWE signed by Andy
                  TA185TSW w/Miller Radiator 1
                  DHC2000 & Victor O/A
                  Parker Plasma 40

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by HiHo View Post
                    I am looking to buy a minimum 60 gal vertical stationary air compressor. I want a Ingersoll Rand that will most likely require truck delivery to my house. My problem is that I have no way of transporting a 300+lb top heavy air compressor in packaging and on a palette from the street to my garage.
                    That really shouldn't be any worse than a refrigerator at 300 pounds and it's less than most gun safes.

                    I'd expect the delivery guy to have a way to get it to the side of the street at the minimum, I'd really expect him to have a way or at least help get it to the building if there is a drive way. If he can drive close to a door and you only need to go a few feet I'd get it on a piece of plywood and skid it to where you need to go when I could arrange what ever help I need.

                    Throw some bb's or lead shot on the floor there and it'll roll like it's on ball bearings, lol. Almost.
                    Last edited by Jack Ryan; 01-12-2007, 10:12 AM.

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                    • #11
                      If you have the neighbor girl/wife/daughter there to receive the delivery, wearing cutoffs and halter top, I guarantee the driver will be more than willing to get it into your garage
                      *** Disclaimer ***

                      As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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                      • #12
                        To move my 1,100 lb. lathe around the garage, we used a pry bar to lift each end 2 inches at a time and progressively blocked it up. Eventually got it high enough to slip some 2 x 4s under, then clamped some heavy-duty 5 inch urethane tread casters under them and rolled it around.
                        --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                        Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                        -------------------------

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                        • #13
                          Ask the driver to help you move it to the curb. Then take your cars (hopefully you have two) pin the compressor between the two cars and wait til your arranged help arrives later in the day. It'll be crated and anybody passing will think you got a new hot water tank. Pinning it between the cars will deter someone from taking it. Don't try to muscle it by yourself its not worth your health and besides you don't want to tip it over accidently. Uncrichie.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
                            To move my 1,100 lb. lathe around the garage, we used a pry bar to lift each end 2 inches at a time and progressively blocked it up. Eventually got it high enough to slip some 2 x 4s under, then clamped some heavy-duty 5 inch urethane tread casters under them and rolled it around.

                            Nicely done!

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                            • #15
                              I like the 2 car method. Kind of made me laugh, but makes sense.

                              Actually, the threshold I mentioned is part of my driveway apron. It seems that when the Streets Department repaved the street they left about 2" of curb reveal. In other words, once I get to the top of this 2” bump, I’m right on my driveway apron which has a nice slope sure to top over the compressor. My driveway has a nice slope too, but not as bad as the apron.

                              To make things worse, I don’t live too far from the ghettos of Philadelphia. I’d hate to have something that looks expensive out for everyone to see and something that would suggest I have tools in the garage. So it’s kind of important for me to get this thing in the garage ASAP after delivery.

                              From what I read, the driver is only responsible for lift gating this thing down and it’s up to the buyer to take it from there. I’d hate to get a difficult driver.

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