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  • Security Screen Door Plans?

    Hi. I've enjoyed reading all of your posts since I first discovered this forum a couple of months ago. Now I have a question...

    Does anyone know where I can find (buy or copy) plans to weld up a security screen door for my home entryway? I'd like to build one and have it powdercoated. If I can't find plans, guess I'll have to make my own by taking tape measure, pad, pencil and spending some time at the Depot display.
    Scott

    Miller XMT 350 CC/CV
    Miller 22 A wirefeeder w/Bernard 400A Q-gun
    Miller 30A Spoolmatic/WC-24 Weld Control
    Hypertherm Powermax 30
    CK 210 torch / WP-18 torch
    Victor, Harris O/A cart
    4"x6" Enco bandsaw on raised cart
    Dewalt Chop, etc.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dmaxer1
    Hi. I've enjoyed reading all of your posts since I first discovered this forum a couple of months ago. Now I have a question...

    Does anyone know where I can find (buy or copy) plans to weld up a security screen door for my home entryway? I'd like to build one and have it powdercoated. If I can't find plans, guess I'll have to make my own by taking tape measure, pad, pencil and spending some time at the Depot display.
    I often find I vary my mounting style depending on the design of the entry door and its mouldings. Post a picture of your front door and we might have some ideas.

    Other than than, they're sort of easy as long as you make them squared.

    Here's one I charged a pretty penny to build and install:

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks...Here is a photo

      Thanks MAC for your reply! Your comments on building the door square are well taken. Here is a photo (I hope I did the upload correctly). My entryway exterior door opening measured from jamb to jamb and header to threshold is 42.75" wide by 80.5" high.

      Specifically, I'm wondering if I'll have to fabricate the housing for the lockset or if those can be obtained prefabricated.
      Scott

      Miller XMT 350 CC/CV
      Miller 22 A wirefeeder w/Bernard 400A Q-gun
      Miller 30A Spoolmatic/WC-24 Weld Control
      Hypertherm Powermax 30
      CK 210 torch / WP-18 torch
      Victor, Harris O/A cart
      4"x6" Enco bandsaw on raised cart
      Dewalt Chop, etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        I always buy my lock boxes from my local steel supplier. He has two sizes each in 1-hole or 2-hole. They are also available here, but skip to page 2 for the real ones:

        http://www.kingmetals.com/Default.as...&CurrentPage=1

        Try the picture again, after clicking on "manage attachments" below, then browse and double-click your file (make sure it is resized for e-mail first) and then click upload, then close that window when it's done and send the reply.

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        • #5
          This is one of my fav art/fab sites. Lots of gates and doors.

          http://www.zenzibar.com/CosmicSteel/gates.htm
          Garfish

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          • #6
            This is one I built for my own home, prior to it being painted. Mac is right, buy your lockboxes, they're like $3 - $6 apiece, trying to make one is just counterproductive.
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            • #7
              When I first started building doors, I would spend a lot of time laying out the box in the door at the same time as the frame pieces.

              I've found it much easier to build the door WITHOUT the lock box and the cut and weld it in after the door is done. Anybody else do this? Or what do you do?

              Comment


              • #8
                probably not relevant but it just dawned on me that if you we're doing this for security as well as ventilation you should use the double lock box so that you have a keyed lock on both sides of the door. otherwise someone might just rip your screen and reach inside to open the door. I'm sure you already thought of that part and i'm just thinking slowly but it's almost 2am.

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                • #9
                  Thanks!

                  All good advice, thanks. I'll definitely buy a lockbox after I figure out what the difference is between the various types and what the catalog nomenclature means.

                  I'll probably use some kind of perforated metal or extra heavy wire weave rather than regular window screen material just to reduce the chance of a rip/enter scenario. The idea of a double cylinder deadbolt is too risky in case of a fire and a dropped key IMHO. I also like the idea of a pre-hung security door, hinged to its own steel jamb frame with a flange through which I can run bolts into the wall around the exterior door opening. It sounds easier to build a squared-up jamb frame that fits snugly into the opening, take the frame back into the garage and finally build a door to fit the frame.
                  Scott

                  Miller XMT 350 CC/CV
                  Miller 22 A wirefeeder w/Bernard 400A Q-gun
                  Miller 30A Spoolmatic/WC-24 Weld Control
                  Hypertherm Powermax 30
                  CK 210 torch / WP-18 torch
                  Victor, Harris O/A cart
                  4"x6" Enco bandsaw on raised cart
                  Dewalt Chop, etc.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dmaxer1
                    I also like the idea of a pre-hung security door, hinged to its own steel jamb frame with a flange through which I can run bolts into the wall around the exterior door opening. It sounds easier to build a squared-up jamb frame that fits snugly into the opening, take the frame back into the garage and finally build a door to fit the frame.
                    Sure, it sounds good. Trust me, though. It's a pain. It'll be a LOT easier for you since you don't have to transport it across town, though. You can always use a temporary bottom piece that helps give it some rigidity during moving it, though, if you feel it needs it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Modifed Home Depot

                      Hi,

                      We had a Home Depot security door on our house which had rusted with age. When we painted the house we were going to get it powder coated but the powder coat place couldn't/wouldn't do it because they would not have been able to sandblast and clean the spaces under the expanded metal.

                      I gutted the door, keeping the hinges, lock box, and framework. The expanded metal is not welded to the door but attched with machine screws. On the interior side there is a moulding made of 2" x 1/8 thick flatstock that holds on the expanded metal and "finishes" the look. The fact that it can be disassembled allowed each of the pieces to be powdercoated.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here is one I made for my mom-in-law

                        Here is a security door i made for my mom-in-law. Measurements were 100" tall x 36" wide. I used 1"x1.5" rectangle 16 guage tubing for the frame, 1/4" hammered round stock for the vines, thin metal stamped leaves and hand forged copper roses. I didn't want to do just a rectangle door because I wanted it to be more decorative. I had it powder coated a black and copper vein. After all was said and done, it ran me about $375 at most.Click image for larger version

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                        • #13
                          I am considering a 96 x 72 door.

                          on the center door without lock how do you secure it to keep form being popped open.

                          also how do you hinge the door without the hinge pipe being took off from the outsides.

                          if you have links that would be helpful.

                          thank you

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doveguy1 View Post
                            ...on the center door without lock how do you secure it to keep form being popped open.

                            also how do you hinge the door without the hinge pipe being took off from the outsides....
                            Depends on the conditions around the door being secured.

                            Use hinges that are designed with a non-removable pin and that are welded on. Use one-way head lag screws to install new door frame to building framing.

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