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Compressed Air- Water Separator

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  • #31
    Franz is this the idea?

    Does it work out like this? I think I shrunk it down a little toooooo much. Maybe the kids with the good eyes can see it. David

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    • #32
      From what I can see thru the magnifying glass, your sketch has an extended tube inside the chamnber, and that's WRONG.
      The elbow inside the chamber just turns the air down.

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      • #33
        The Franz-a-nator

        Franz could you use an aquarium pump(cheap and able to run constantly) to circulate water through the copper tube wrapping the main tube. I've got a little pump (low flow)I got from Graingers that I used to pump water out of the lake onto a fiberglass slide on the dock. If you stuck it in a 5 gallon bucket with a mini cooling tower that would probably get it! Ha. I thought you mentioned dip tube so I added one,wasn't really sure if it was the right idea. Can't figure this picture shrinker out yet,at first it was too big ,then it was close but too big ,then it was too small. Oh well I'll have to work on that one.


        David

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        • #34
          Since you live in Georgia, humid air is probably more of a problem than what I deal with here in the great white north. As long as the pump will lift the water high enough to run thru the tube, it ought to work. How long the water will stay cold enough to make a difference is an open question that just might lead to a degree being awarded from Rube Goldberg School of Engineering by the time you finish with the cooling tower.
          The compressor I have in my basement shop was made for Ritter Dental as the air supply for a hospital dental area, and uses a water cooled aftercooler to dehumidify the compressed air. I have a small pump that circulates the water from my cistern, 1000 gal, thru that unit, and it works very well. The cistern water is around 60 degrees most of the year. It doesn't really require a huge volume of water to keep the seperator cold enough to work.
          Experimentation is only limited by the parts you can lay your hands on. Of course, available floor space can be a limiting factor.

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          • #35
            Separator

            Yeah its super humid here Franz. In the summer you can go outside at 9am and be sweating. I've been checking on the Champion/Garder-Denver line of air compressors. A 5Hp 2 stage R-series 80 gallon is running about $1750.00. They've got a true 7.5 Hp(electric motor) with a pump that goes on a 10Hp(runs low RPM-670).The guy at Champion said that it would probably last forever at that Rpm. They put that same pump on compressors to 15 Hp. That compressor is pretty expensive $2800.00. They've got a so called 7.5 that's cheaper but it is a 5hp speeded up to 1035 rpm to achieve the output(don't want that). I've seen several posts on the web about air compressors since we typed about the Champions,all are extremely positive.One guy said he had 6 compessors over the years and the only 2 that still worked were Champions. Here's another shot at the separator picture. David
            Last edited by echo8287; 10-09-2003, 01:29 AM.

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            • #36
              I have a Monkey Wards that has a Baldor motor and a Champion pump on that has given excellent service, at least 30 yrs, before the advent of cheap import stuff. It was 12 or 1300 $ back then and the only thing I have ever done to it was a rod brg in it. I put rings in it while I had it apart but probably didnt need it. Its still my primary compressor.
              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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              • #37
                Dang, that new picture comes right up to my standards of mechanicle drawing. I coulda done that, BUT, they confiscated my sharp crayons.
                I have the coil on mine tacked to the pipe with solder for better heat reansferr, of course you can read that I still haven't located an epoxy that has good heat transferr propertys.

                After digging thru my alligator protected archives, the last Champion jug I bought cost me $600- in 1981. Back then, I justified the cost on energy savings alone, and figured the compressor was free after 18 months. The Ritter Dental unit I got for hauling it away (I love MBA types) has a Champion jug inside, and the spare I bought just cause it was going too cheap in an auction is also a Champion. The only money I've ever spent on a Champion is oil changes. I don't think I'll ever wear any of them out, cause they run at a reasonable speed.
                I've got enough spare compressors to last me 2 lifetimes, but all you guys who want them live too far away. I even have a couple 25hp jugs that came off furnace cleaning trucks, one of witch I intend to make PTO tractor driven.

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                • #38
                  Resusitate This One

                  What about submerging the Franz design in water. That will cool the air dramatically before going into your line?

                  Alfredo

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                  • #39
                    Cooling down the air is the answer

                    When I finished my shop, this compressor did a great job except some times I had water in the line that looked like I had a water hose hooked up. I had a 50' piece of 1/2" copper pipe, so I wound around a 5 Gallon bucket and made a few bends. If you look at the picture (wish it was clearer) you can see the color change in the tubing from the output from the pump to the input to the tank. It is still really shinny on the inlet to the tank. I also added a cooler after it since I need to feed a CMM and they really want dry air. I think 95+ is removed from the tube. I heard that If I was able to keep this tube in water, it would really drop the temp of the air.

                    Jeff

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                    • #40
                      Thank you Woodzy. The picture shows it all. That is exactly my idea but putting the copper coil inside a water container. My concern is with the type of conectors that I should use on the copper tube? What did you use?

                      Thank you again


                      Alfredo

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                      • #41
                        compression fittings

                        I used just standard plumbing brass compression fittings on the conversion. At my location, I didn't have access to running water or I probably would of rigged this up inside a 25 Gallon plastic garbage can but really I think the copper was enough to reduce the heat of the air. I take it from the compressor pump and go up and start the coil. That way, all of the water is just a slide down the pipe into the tank. Make sure you empty the tank often (I must admit that I don't do this as often as I should).

                        Jeff

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                        • #42
                          Nice work on the cooler.

                          I have wanted to do something like that, then fed into a turbulent separator like Franz describes to actually remove the water from the line before it hits the tank. And maybe an auto drain from HF on the separator?

                          Another option would be something like a tubo intercooler (wet or dry) or large pipe evaporator coil from AC with a fan would be good. Extra surface area with forced airflow and all that. And instead of submerging in water with attendant leakage/spill/mounting/location problems, why not hook up a mister to kick on with a relay/valve tripped by the compressor motor relay. The evaporative effect of the mist on the hot tubing would probably work as well or better than submerging and depending on radiant/convection transfer.

                          Just one more of the things I've wanted to do but never got it done...
                          Offroad Fabrication Network

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                          • #43
                            let me make sure I have this clear... you guys are hooking up your coolers/separators between the compressor and the tank, not right after the tank?
                            Mark
                            (aka: Silverback, WS6 TA, JYDog, 83 Crossfire TA, mpikas, mmp...)
                            Bridgeport J-head -- Synchrowave 180 SD -- Hobart Handler 135 -- HTP 38 plasma
                            HF bandsaw -- Rigid 4.5” angle grinder (+2 cheapie HF ones)
                            BFH

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                            • #44
                              That is the best place for a separator . You get maximum water separation with maximum temperature change plus it is best to remove the water before your storage tank.
                              My separator is a two piece system a multi pass cooling radiator from a refrigerator pack directly off the compressor followed by a column separator that makes use of the other factors that cause or aid separation , they are change of velocity , rapid change of direction, and impact on a cool surface.
                              My water column is after the check valve and my storage tank is mounted above it so it self drains into the column should any water get into it.
                              My cooling coils are before the check valve so they are unloaded between runs and aid the compressor starting by reducing pressure build up untill full rpm is achieved.
                              I do not use an auto drain because my compressor is mounted as far from the shop as possible and the morning trip to drain the trap serves as a check for problems.

                              I put extra storage tanks at the end of each run so air feeds the tool from both directions during use reducing pressure drop considerably.
                              Terry

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                              • #45
                                Well, looking at this again it’s got me wondering some more… anyone have experience with running a hose off the compressor to your cooler/separator (I want to wall mount them out of the way)? Right now I replumbed the compressor with the compressor plumbed to the check valve/unloader valve that is screwed into a small chamber and then has a length of ½” pink Goodyear rubber air hose looping it back to the tank, and I intend to replace that with the cooler/separator assembly hooked up with the same rubber hose.

                                Right now it seems OK but it does get warm.
                                Mark
                                (aka: Silverback, WS6 TA, JYDog, 83 Crossfire TA, mpikas, mmp...)
                                Bridgeport J-head -- Synchrowave 180 SD -- Hobart Handler 135 -- HTP 38 plasma
                                HF bandsaw -- Rigid 4.5” angle grinder (+2 cheapie HF ones)
                                BFH

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