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welding exhaust pipe on car near gas tank

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  • welding exhaust pipe on car near gas tank

    I have a broken broken flange weld on my cars exhaust system. The broken weld is on the flange which has the pipe that connects to the catalytic converter side of the exhaust system. Therefore, removing the exhaust system would be difficult. Also, the broken flange that needs welding is about 8 inches from the gas tank. My question is, if I weld near the tank do you think the sparks from the welder will cause the gas tank to expode?

  • #2
    as long as you have no leaks your fine but to be safe try putting some sort of shield between the exhaust and gas tank if your that worried about it...ie, sheetmetal, maybe even a few layers of tin foil or something.

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    • #3
      I agree with Malibu your best bet I think is to put some kind of barrier up to try to aviod any problems. You may be better off waiting until the tank almost empty to start welding on it. Just my thoughts. MDuke
      Lincoln 3200 HD Mig
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      MDuke
      "Face it no one owes you a living, go work for what is yours."

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      • #4
        Mduke,
        It's the vapors in gas that are worrisom to work around, full fuel tank is better to minimize vapors. A shield would be needed, make sure have no leaks or contained area for vapor accumulation.
        Manny

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        • #5
          Yup on heat shield. If you have to improvise, I'd put an oven mitt behind that sheet metal...and watch it for burning...which it shouldn't unless you direct heat to it....then, I'd venilate , with fan blowing TOWARDS gas tank (so fumes are not transported to the weld), I'd also be doing it outside. If MIG, you'll have to use flux cored wire in order to use the fan. If all fails and it explodes, be sure to let us know!
          "Good Enough Never Is"

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          • #6
            You didn't mention what kind of vehicle this is. For all we know this may be a plastic gas tank. Careful.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MDuke
              You may be better off waiting until the tank almost empty to start welding on it. MDuke
              Wrong, Wrong, Wrong! The more vapor space in the tank, the more likely you WILL have an explosion. It's the gasoline vapors that ignite, not the liquid itself. If you've ever seen a flammable liquid burn, you will notice that the flame is actually a short distance above the liquid. The liquid does not burn, as it heats up it produces more vapors and sustains the fire.

              If you're welding in close proximity of the fuel tank and it is a metal tank, not plastic, and you do not have any leaks. You will do fine. You can use a heat shield if you'd like just for an extra measure of safety. Also, make sure there are no rubber fuel or brake lines that are close. If there are, shield them also.
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              • #8
                hi. this is just for a little information. when my dads garage burned down,his almost new car was sitting in it. a 1979 dodge aspen that he bought new for a retirement car. he had just filled up the gas tank. the gas tank never blew up or burned. Dad started to go in to start car and back it out. before he got to the door some boards from overhead fell down on the car and he decided not to do it. the state fire marshall said lighting stuck the roof. i have read before that it is not so much the gas that will get you but the fumes. the lower the gas level the more fumes. good luck. charley.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Morgan
                  I have a broken broken flange weld on my cars exhaust system. The broken weld is on the flange which has the pipe that connects to the catalytic converter side of the exhaust system. Therefore, removing the exhaust system would be difficult. Also, the broken flange that needs welding is about 8 inches from the gas tank. My question is, if I weld near the tank do you think the sparks from the welder will cause the gas tank to expode?
                  Once again I would like to thank everyone for their comments. The gas tank in the car is about 3/4 full, and I have some scap sheet metal that I will be using for a shield. However, if there are something else that some would like to add, please keep the comments going.

                  Morgan

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Morgan
                    Once again I would like to thank everyone for their comments. The gas tank in the car is about 3/4 full, and I have some scap sheet metal that I will be using for a shield. However, if there are something else that some would like to add, please keep the comments going.

                    Morgan
                    If its not completly broken it might be benificial to go to the car wast to get the undercarrage wast. If its completely broken that might not be the best idea. In that case id clean it off by hand. Either way i say clean it to get off the grease and grime. the last thing you need is a pocket of greese and road grim catching fire.

                    Id also make sure there are no rubber hoses near by. Im prone to melting stuff thats "not that close"

                    Just my 2 cents

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bowtieman31
                      Wrong, Wrong, Wrong! The more vapor space in the tank, the more likely you WILL have an explosion. It's the gasoline vapors that ignite, not the liquid itself. If you've ever seen a flammable liquid burn, you will notice that the flame is actually a short distance above the liquid. The liquid does not burn, as it heats up it produces more vapors and sustains the fire.
                      We used to use small drums of scrap steel as heaters in the stock water tanks. Once or twice a day we'd dump a couple gallons of diesel into the drum, then light a tin can of gasoline and pour it in to start the fire.

                      I've seen many a match go out when it hits the liquid gasoline without starting a fire. If it's cold enough the gas won't vaporize -- makes lighting the fire a challenge.

                      On welding near gas tank -- make sure the heat as well as sparks don't hit the tank. We used a water-soaked rag laid over the tank to help with both.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hotfoot
                        If all fails and it explodes, be sure to let us know!
                        Don't worry, it'll only hurt for a little while . . .
                        *** Disclaimer ***

                        As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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                        • #13
                          Do not arc strike or melt vapor or fuel lines.
                          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                          • #14
                            Midus

                            If ya gotta head-ache take an Asprin, if ya got Cancer see an Doctor.
                            When's the last time ya heard of a "Muffler Shop" burning down?They are the "Pros".
                            Leave the "rust to Midus" or sumpin like dat.Be safe, Al

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                            • #15
                              The guys at Midas do this work everyday. So why not go over and watch them for a bit then maybe another muffler shop.

                              HF has welding blankets that would be a good and not too expensive "fire proof" padding you can protect yourself and the car with.


                              Jerry

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