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  • making $ on side jobs

    I was just wondering if any of you have had any success doing welding jobs at home when your not working. I am wondering what types of work have you had success with. Crafts, repairs, work for other companies?? I am trying the crafts thing right now. I have some stuff on consignment at a local craft store. I sell a few things there, but not much. I did a small craft show this past fall. I sold a couple things. I am going to do a much larger show in March and I am in the process of making up stuff for that. I really want to make some $ on the side to make up for when I don't get any OT. I know these things take time, but they are taking a lot of money too. The crafts are fun, but a few things I make out ok on for the time I have into them, but others take a lot of time and I don't get much money for them. The people at the craft store tell me about what they think people would pay for what I have made. My shop is one stall of the garage. The wife parks in the other stall. We live in Minnesota, so if I kick her out of the garage in the winter she will most likely kick me out of the house . I have a syncrowave 250, a milwaulkee portaband saw and a grinder. With the extra money I hope to make I would like to pay off some debt and then build a shop that would allow me to do more things. I am willing to work hard and do good quality work. Any advice you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Where in MN are you?

    Comment


    • #3
      I would say you have to find unique things to make that sets your stuff a part from everything else out there. "Custom" stuff carries a higher price tag. Don't be afraid to incorperate other materials such as wood or stone - but try to stay away from ceramic tiles as it looks cheap compared to using granite or slate. Here are two projects I did recently. I used the ceramic tile on the plant stand because it's the same tile used on the floor. Good luck.

      Kevin
      Last edited by Vipernut; 12-21-2005, 08:41 PM.
      sigpic

      Fire! Fire! - oh, wait... that's my torch.

      Lincoln PT-225 TIG
      Lincoln 175 MIG

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      • #4
        There's a housing boom around here and all the new houses have privacy fences. I make gate frames for local guys out of 1x2 rectangle tubing. It's not as cool as making custom tables but it's pretty steady.

        I use the $$ to buy tools
        Hobart 135 MIG
        Lincoln 300/300 TIG
        Victor O/A
        Dayton plasma

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        • #5
          Is it a wood gate? I'm trying to picture the 1x2 with wood on it. Do you have a picture of the frame with the wood on it? Or any picture for that matter. We're replacing our fence in the spring, may I copy your design for our gate?
          Thanks!
          --Bob
          millr210, 125cf tank C-25w/.030 wire. spdgls 9002x. Jet 5x6 bndsw, HF chopsaw, 4.5 and 9 inch grindrs. .

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          • #6
            Here's a gate that Toolaholic did

            http://www.hobartwelders.com/mboard/...ad.php?t=13435
            Ed Conley
            Screaming Broccoli, Inc
            http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
            MM252
            MM211
            Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
            TA185
            SO 2020 Bender
            Miller 125c Plasma
            "Hold my beer while I try this!"

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            • #7
              Just a gate.

              This was from a Post by Changing Ground
              Ed Conley
              Screaming Broccoli, Inc
              http://www.screamingbroccoli.net/
              MM252
              MM211
              Miller Passport Plus, Spoolmate 100
              TA185
              SO 2020 Bender
              Miller 125c Plasma
              "Hold my beer while I try this!"

              Comment


              • #8
                No pics, It's such a lame job I never thought about taking pics except when I had a big pile of ten of em...

                They are just rectangular frames with a single cross brace and holes drilled in them. The guys bolt 2x4's horizonally and nail the vertical planks to the 2x4's. I make the hinges from 1/2 id pipe welded to 3/16x1 steel and the guys provide the lag screw type hangers.

                From the front you can't see the metal frame and they won't sag like an all wood gate. I usually do 2 man gates and a double car gate for each job and charge $80 a gate. The materials cost around $120 and I get paid $320 and it sucks
                Hobart 135 MIG
                Lincoln 300/300 TIG
                Victor O/A
                Dayton plasma

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                • #9
                  I have friends who do the craft thing, about 20 weekends a year that do make a living at what they love to do. This is not the life for me, but many enjoy doing this vagabond way of life.


                  Jerry

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fishy Jim
                    Where in MN are you?
                    Becker, MN. Pretty nice out today. I worked in the garage for a while and didn't have to wait for the heater to warm things up. Do you work for yourself?

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                    • #11
                      I've been self employed doing a number of things for the past couple years, now I'm moving towards more welding and machining in those areas but have also taken a side job (40hrs/week) to cover for the slumps and health insurance, etc. Of course as soon as I agreed to the position, my clients started blabbing about me and I have several new projects lined up for the new year, but being busy never hurt anyone.

                      I was up at SCSU for school.

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                      • #12
                        I think you gave yourself the advice you are looking for. Work hard and do good quality work. With that working for you run a small add in your local paper letting people know you exist and what you do.
                        Good Luck!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Extra $

                          Hey Weld55, good luck. There is some excellent advice here. Like wldingfool said,
                          HTML Code:
                          Work hard and do good quality work.
                          . I have had some success selling things to people at work, building custom stuff. Always be ready to listen when someone ask you, "Can you make, do, build...", don't be afraid to give it a try. It does take some time and yes $ invested to get started and not everything you make will be a big seller. The bench I made for my wife for Christmas has generated some sales for me already. I showed some pics to some women at work and 2 of them already want one and another lady wants a similar one for her bedroom to put at the foot of the bed. I also sell some stuff on consignment at a crafts store at a local flea market, they are great people. We have a good working relationship, they often see a need for things people are wanting and we discuss what is selling and what is not, price, etc. I often run ideas past them to see what they think. I have been selling there for about 5 years. I started out doing Adirondack chairs made from pressure treated pine, which is still my biggest seller, I just recently started selling some of my welding projects with them. Once the word gets out, people will start looking you up for projects to make. Once again, good luck. Oh yeah, take loads of pictures so you can show off all your stuff.
                          Mike H.
                          MM 210
                          We are surrounded by insurmountable opportunities.

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                          • #14
                            Just be careful when you commit to making things for people, tell them that you expect something in writing on what they want before starting and make sure the check clears.

                            Also make sure that if somebody wants something custom built for you, that it is not copyrighted, patented or anything like that. My wife who is a woodworker got burned over some of this, a guy wanted fonts that were copywritten and the design he wanted made belonged to somebody else. You may think that small changes will make things different enought to be do able, it probably is, but how much will the court costs be to prove it.

                            I run a small business and we do replicate some things, but most are older items that could not be in copyright at this time. In my paintings, I was asked to do something and because their name is WARM, I used a sunburst in the painting, another local group said they owned the sunburst and that I could not use it. They sent me letters and had their attorney call and I told one and all that this was riduclous, and I got a threatening letter about go to court. The organization that I was doing for (for free by the way) said to do my creative things and let them worry about the situation. About a week later BP came out with thier sunburst. People stopped bother me and now the painting is the logo for WARM now.

                            Small business is the back bone of the American economy, so do your work, be smart, write everything down. It will save your butt!

                            Jerry

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                            • #15
                              I always get half up front from new customers. That covers materials, my time getting them, and at least some of my time if they don't follow through. Never had a problem getting the other half (everyones always been more than thrilled with their stuff).

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