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  • trailer project update

    I've finally gotten back to work on this car trailer project. I have most of the parts to finish the trailer, minus the winch, equalizer hitch, and the materials to finish off the tool box.

    Here are some pics taken today after I finished installing the Dexter Tor-Flex torsion axles and the wheels/tires.

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer36.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer37.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer38.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer39.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer40.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer41.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer42.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer43.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer44.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer45.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer46.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer47.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer48.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer49.jpg

    http://www.qis.net/~geislert/trailer50.jpg

    A couple quick explanations of some of the pics. The chains shown are the safety break away chains. I decided to drill a large hole and weld in a thick wall tube to allow the chains to bolt to the frame without crushing the box tube...much stronger mount too.

    The fender pics show how I used Fusor panel adhesive to assemble the back & sides instead of welding. This was done to eliminate any chance of rust forming between the panels. On the inside, I used a finger to smooth the excess bead effectively creating a seam sealer inside. On the outside, the excess oozed out and will be ground off flush making a nice clean line where the overlap occurs.

    Also seen is the basically completed tool box skelatin. The spare tire is sitting in it's final location and also visible is an "X" which helps keep the structure from racking.

    Next on the "to-do" list is to decide how to mount the fenders, drill some holes for the electrical wiring, and some minor finish grinding underneath. I hope to be able to take the trailer to be metal blasted in a couple weeks, then final prep and paint.

  • #2
    Very nice work,1 question on the ramps,why didn't you build them inside their respective legs at the very back of the trailer?I know you have your reasons,just wondering

    Comment


    • #3
      Good question.

      If I put the ramps under the tire runner area, there would be no place to put the tail lights. I refuse to put the lights on the outside of the frame as their shin knockers at the track, or worse yet, the get hit and bent/broken.

      I plan to install oval recessed tail lights under the ramp hook/bar. Two red stop/turn/tail lights per side.

      It may be more work to pull/lift the ramps, but I prefer the rear layout much better as it is. My current/older trailer has slide out ramps, but the light issue was of more importance to me.

      Also, in the middle recessed area (on either side of the ramp storage), I will install two clear back up lights (one per side). These will be surface mount as they are protected from being hit/broken.

      Comment


      • #4
        BTW, if anyone has any good ideas/pics of how to make the fenders removable, please speak up.

        I'd like to be able to hide most of the mounting hardware/brackets...something easy to use as I load/unload at the track often.

        Comment


        • #5
          10secBu,

          Great job! Great pics! Keep 'em coming. You are definitely detail oriented, right down to the grade 8 bolts on the chains. Your welds look great. How do you keep the long ones so straight? I hope you have a secure place to hide this when not in use.

          Dave
          "Some days you're the dog, some days you're the fire hydrant"

          Comment


          • #6
            Dave, with all the professional/career welders & experts here, that is quite a compliment. Thanks you.

            I cheat on the welds I suppose. I usually wear a heavy glove on my left hand (non on my right...need to "feel" the gun), and use my left hand as a guide/brace to keep the bead where I want it to go. It may be a crutch of sorts, but it's what I found works pretty well for me.

            The past two years or so i've worked part time for a buddies body shop doing restoration/repair/welding/fab work and have improved my skills greatly. Not to mention the fact that I am now forced to learn to weld out of position, in uncomfortable places and also with very little room to move, much less work/weld. Just yesterday, I had to do some welding work on a C5 Corvette were puting a cage in so the owner can run the highway road races...he's shooting for the 200 mph class and he's required to have a full cage in a stock bodies vehicle with a full interior. Nothing like laying on the floors with your head jambed in the foot area, clutch & brake pedals pushing against your helmet, and your trying to look around the corner to weld the front side of a bar joint against the rocker/floor...now that you picture this, try to figure our how to get your arm in there as well as your Mig torch .

            I'm now 33 years old and would like to someday have my own fab shop specializing in street rod/race car fabrication...for now, I'm happy being a Mr. Mom, working towards the future.

            Again...thanks for the compliment...means alot to a hobbyist welder.

            Comment


            • #7
              Now that's right pretty, but, did you say you're gonna grind on the bottom? What for, do you west coast guys look at the bottoms of trailers?
              Seriously, removable fenders would be relatively easy if you put a flange on the back side of the fender with a few pins indexing into the deck rail, and add some 1" pins running across the fender and into the trailer frame. You'll probably want a center brace between the tandems too.
              What's the panel adhesive you use, and how does it hold up over time? If it can prevent rust, I could save a lot of time on replacement panels back here in corrosionville.

              Comment


              • #8
                Mr. Mom, That trailer is coming along nicely. Do you have pictures of the axle brackets you posted about last week? I would like to see how those turned out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Franz
                  Now that's right pretty, but, did you say you're gonna grind on the bottom? What for, do you west coast guys look at the bottoms of trailers?
                  Seriously, removable fenders would be relatively easy if you put a flange on the back side of the fender with a few pins indexing into the deck rail, and add some 1" pins running across the fender and into the trailer frame. You'll probably want a center brace between the tandems too.
                  What's the panel adhesive you use, and how does it hold up over time? If it can prevent rust, I could save a lot of time on replacement panels back here in corrosionville.
                  West coast? not me...never been there. I live in Maryland, just south of you in NY...rust belt for sure.

                  The panel adhesive is used in the auto body industry for repairs, etc. The auto manufacturers are using the stuff to assemble cars now. It's VERY string stuff. you will tear the sheetmetal around the adhersive before you'll ever break the bond loose. It's strong enough to keep cars together in severe crashes as well. We like to use in in areas sexposed to elements like wheel wells, floor pans, etc. The only way we have found to break the bind is with heat...a lots of it. If you weld within two inches of the adhesive, it can loosen the bond. The brand/model I used was called Fusor, and was a 15 minute work time product. They offer fast, medium (what I used), and slow. It comes in two attached tube that has a common mixing valve/tip. There's a special $200 manual caulk gun to squeeze the tubes simultaniously.

                  Any body shop supply house should off a similar product.

                  As an example, the latest C5 Corvette uses this stuff quite a bit. The rockers/frame rails are steel, but the floor pans are fiberglass/composit and are joined with this structural adhesive.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Cope, I neglected to take a pic of the welded axle brackets. I'll crawl underneath some time today and shoot a couple pics.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks, I'd like to see them. I don't think I've ever seen a better thought out trailer design.

                      BTW, better send Franz a US map; he thinks Maryland is on the West Coast.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey Cope, here's the pics you requested buddy .

                        http://www.qis.net/~geislert/axlebracket3.jpg

                        http://www.qis.net/~geislert/axlebracket4.jpg

                        http://www.qis.net/~geislert/axlebracket5.jpg

                        http://www.qis.net/~geislert/axlebracket6.jpg

                        http://www.qis.net/~geislert/axlebracket7.jpg

                        The last pic isn't the axle bracket, rather the tongue jack...just wanted to show one of my typical vert down mig welds .

                        Man, I love this 251 Millermatic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Those look like what I would have expected. You truly have a nice trailer coming along. can't wait to see the finished product!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Franz don't need no dang map, he just didn't read the fine print, and read Malibu, and bein an old fart got confused. He **** well knows where his wiff dumped 58 grand into the coffers of UM and all she got for it was a second hand cat and a lardass daughter with a CDL. Well, at least my dalin knows how to pull crabs out of the bay with a string and a chicken neck, I suppose that's worth part of that money.
                            Now, bein that you're messin with all them Cheby Malibus, have you ever run across a guy by the name of John De Rue?
                            RUST, let it rust up a bit & phosphate it, I have a trailer over 25 years old we did that on, and the original paint is still sticking to it. Unless you dip the trailer in epoxy it's the best process I've found.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Franz, since we are on the subject of Geography, where is Hilton, NY? And, BTW, there are lots of us old farts here.

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