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Cutting angles with a chop saw??

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  • #16
    Also notice that the base has multiple positions for the vice "fence". For angles, depending on the size of the stock, you may need to relocate the fence to keep the stock under the center of the blade.
    Offroad Fabrication Network

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    • #17
      That was more like $0.75 worth.........JK , very good point and info
      Originally posted by Sandy
      I'm going to throw in one other consideration for making angled cuts whether a circular abrasive blade or toothed blade and cutting steel or wood.

      When cutting angles (45's) there is tremendous friction and pulling action going on. By that I mean that the direction the blade is rotating tends to 'pull' the piece into the blade on one side and twist the piece out on the other side. The 'pulling in' can be the culprit that makes things seem as tho the blade is having a terrible time cutting (which it is) but what is also happening is we then are getting an in feeding grinding process going on which is more than we wanted and the saw wants to do. If those two pieces are put back together and measured you might find that the amount removed is way more than the actual width of the blade and/or even curved a little.

      In wood working you can feel this happen as the blade makes contact with the wood and can sometimes see it happening too late in the process. The curve effect may not be noticeable at a glance at the one 45 but when two done the same are then put together the cupped out cut is doubled and very obvious. Metal gives less cupping out and more of the grinding off effect.

      In meatl working you can fill in with weldment. In wood working it looks like crap.

      The partial answer is to make sure no angle cuts are done free hand. Clamp and clamp some more. Don't allow the metal/wood to be 'pulled in'.

      10 cents worth here.

      Millermatic 210 "Big Blue"

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      • #18
        angles

        just my 2 cents, I actually use a sliding compound miter saw with abraisive blade for angled cuts - 10 inch HF $99 - clamp piece down, lay the saw on its side using the compound angle, cut through upright portion first, then move in front of it & push through. Actually produces very good cuts, nothing I've found better especially for square stock. Make 90s by cutting a 45 notch out of both sides, bend over & weld 3 sides.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Seth_tomblin
          just my 2 cents, I actually use a sliding compound miter saw with abraisive blade for angled cuts - 10 inch HF $99
          How long have you been using the saw that way? I've thought about using one of my Delta woodworking saws in the past, but was concerned that the motors are not sheilded to keep the metal dust out.
          Chuck P
          www.oldjeep.com

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          • #20
            Thanks for all the input guys. I seem to have it somewhat down now. I moved the guides as far back as possible and held more pressure without stalling the saw. I think my biggest mistake I was making was not holding enough pressure. I also got some Norton wheels on the way Something I noticed about this cheapo saw was not to trust the markings on the base for angles. 45 degrees equals more like 40 degrees. Oh yeah I did find it easier to just cut to length then lay the leg I wanted angled flat and cut it instead of cutting a compound miter then cutting one leg off straight.

            One thing I did learn the hard way was to cover the top of my head not just my face. It only took one good bounce from a spark onto my bald head to realize it.
            Last edited by K_P; 03-03-2005, 07:19 PM.

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            • #21
              wood saw

              been using my HF slider for about a year, with no problems. I do blow out the motor every couple days of use, the thing that seems to take the most beating is the rails for the slider... the bearings don't seem to like the metal dust too much, but I keep wiping down the rails and blowing out the bearing housing and no problems so far. As far as the motor thing goes, I have a craftsman circular saw that is about 6-7 years old, the bearings started howling on spindown about 5 years ago, so I bought a new one and started using it for cutting metal with an abrasive blade... wd40 bearings & blow out every couple of months, still works like a charm. Very cheap portable way to cut metal.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by dieseladam
                I hope it is not off topic, but I was wondering if anyone here has any experience with those metal dry saws that use a carbide tipped blade.

                I believe Dewalt and Millwuakee make them. How accurate are they when used to cut angles? How accurate are they in general?

                I am thinking about gettting one and it would be nice to hear from some people that have used one.
                Diesel -- I have used a Makita carbide chop saw and it it AWESOME. It makes very accurate, clean cuts, does not blow abrasive all over the shop, makes far fewer sparks. Also, the blade does not bend like the abrasive ones do, so the cuts are truer. The only downside is that it costs like $450.

                It is very important that the saw not be lifted back past the cut piece once the cut is done until it stops spinning -- this can bust teeth off. If you are in a shop with a lot of people or students (or apes) these saws will not take abuse well. Also, if you are goping to cut a lot of thick metal you would be better off with a horizontal band saw (or maybe a cold saw, but these are out of my league).

                If you search this forum you will see dialogue on this -- I bought it online after recommendations from this forum.

                Chris

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                • #23
                  I like the cut to length than cut angle idea. I really wish I had read that two weeks ago when I had to make a series of accurate (length & angle ) miter cuts in some angle iron.
                  One of the biggest problems was trying to control the length as the blade would pull the peice as it would cut because of the jig I had to come up with in order to clamp it downwhen making opposite miters
                  Say what you mean & mean what you say

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by dieseladam
                    I hope it is not off topic, but I was wondering if anyone here has any experience with those metal dry saws that use a carbide tipped blade.

                    I believe Dewalt and Millwuakee make them. How accurate are they when used to cut angles? How accurate are they in general?

                    I am thinking about gettting one and it would be nice to hear from some people that have used one.
                    I got me one cuts like butter. hot butter. the little chips it makes get very hot.
                    Smith oxy-outfit, Lincoln SP170T mig, ESAB 875 plasma, Dynasty 200DX, Power MIG 350 next
                    Dan's page

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                    • #25
                      45degeesnorth/DF5152,
                      I bought a Skil SPT 62 MTC22. I like the saw, the only problem is when cutting angle iron at 45 degrees. With this saw you can only go 45 degrees in one direction. As a result to cut the 45 on the other side that has to be done another way. I tried using a block to flip and clamp the angle iron in the proper position. Result blade damage, cutoff piece stuck in drywall. Do your saws go 45 in both directions? If not how do you cut the other 45 angle?

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