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Cutting angles with a chop saw??

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  • Cutting angles with a chop saw??

    I'm trying to cut 45's on a chop saw in 1.25x1.25x 1/8" angle. I have a cheap chop saw from lowes that does fine on cutting flat stock but when trying to do angles obviously its not liking cutting through the flat side. I know a chop saw isn't the best tool for this but its all I got besides a cut off tool and a recip. saw. The abrasive wheel on the saw now is the one that came with it and hasn't made but about 5 cuts. I'm sure the blade is as cheap as the saw so would getting a better brand abrasive wheel help out? Also what is the proper way to cut angle iron as far as pressure and speed are concerned? I'm trying for 45's to make the frame for a cart. I'm kinda wishing I'd have gotten a bandsaw now but I just dont have the room for it as the chop saw can be put up out of the way.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Move the guides back so that you're not cutting through the whole bottom at once
    Chuck P
    www.oldjeep.com

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    • #3
      Use the chop saw to cut it to length then just cut the corners off with your cut off tool.

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      • #4
        I have always like makita blades the best. There are other name brands but I personally think the makitas out perform them all. Scott

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        • #5
          Oldjeep, as simple as it is I didnt think of that. It makes sense though, I'll give it a try

          MillerRules, I did that on a couple corners last night and it worked pretty good, I'm just trying to justify my chop saw purchase to make me feel like it was a worthwhile investment.

          Tigman, thanks for the input. I'll keep 'em in mind and see what anyone else has to say about blade brands. Have you ever used Norton? I've heard some good things about them and I noticed thats what we use at work and I can get 'em for reasonably cheap through work if they're worth a crap.

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          • #6
            Norton has been around for a long time. How about turning the angle so the vee is at the top when you clamp it in the vise?
            What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mike W
              Norton has been around for a long time. How about turning the angle so the vee is at the top when you clamp it in the vise?
              You cannot ut 45's that way. I suggest using good pressure to keep the sparks flying. Once I slow down and the cut stops sparking, it's over with my chopsaw. The torque in my Milwaukee is quite strong and it hasn't stalled yet. I just 45 cut a bunch of 3/16x1.5x1.5 angle and it did fine. I did cut in two steps, one to size, then a 45 the flat way. This leaves a nice groove for the bead and makes the size more predictable. My 45's just never seem to end up the same length from point to point.. My blade is definitely getting smaller though.

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              • #8
                I have the high power DeWalt 5.3 HP chop saw with DeWalt blades and i also have a hard time with 45's on it. Nature of the beast i guess. I did fint out the best way to cut flat stock is to stand it up and cut down on it vs. laying it flat at cutting it ( tho most of my stock is some 1/4" to most of it being 3/8" + 1/2" ), cuts 4 times faster with this method. Also when cutting i give the blade pressure cut 1/4 way through pause with 1/2 pressure and then keep going at 1/4 of the cut at a time , seems to cut faster then full pressure al the way through and it keeps the cut strighter with less chance to get off line.
                Last edited by Roospike; 03-01-2005, 09:34 PM.
                Millermatic 210 "Big Blue"

                VICTOR SUPERRANGE

                OPTREL UVEX SATELLITE

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                ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                "remember, spark production is not welding,
                a nice shiny cold bead, piled high, that i can knock off with a banana does not make you a weldor."
                Pumpkinhead

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike W
                  Norton has been around for a long time. How about turning the angle so the vee is at the top when you clamp it in the vise?
                  This is a good way to make a straight cut to length [/\]. couldnt you then set the angle, clamp the piece the same way again and just set it up to cut the one corner?

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                  • #10
                    I cut angle all the time on my chop saw. One trick I learned is to put backing piece, something like a 1 inch square tubing behind the angle. That puts the angle more under the center of the blade. Just make sure everything is snug so the angle won't twist under the blade. If that happens your blade will brake apart.WEAR EYE PROTECTION.
                    Hobart ACDC
                    Miller 210
                    Miller Bobcat 250
                    Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Cutter
                    Victor Oxy/Actyl

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by johns6
                      I cut angle all the time on my chop saw. One trick I learned is to put backing piece, something like a 1 inch square tubing behind the angle. That puts the angle more under the center of the blade. Just make sure everything is snug so the angle won't twist under the blade. If that happens your blade will brake apart.WEAR EYE PROTECTION.
                      Not only that, but NEVER stand in-line with the blade. Stand off to the side so that if the blade does break apart, you won't get hit by the pieces. I've been glad to have heeded this advice on a few occasions.

                      I think the spacer is a good idea, though. Caution is in order.
                      Barry

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                      • #12
                        If you truly want a 45 degree cut you must lay it FLAT for the angle cut. If the angle is cut with the point up you'll have a compound mitered piece. Like the cuts on rafter for hip roofs. One could incorporate the bevel into the weld area and then fill the groove with weld bead, but that would depend on the requirements. The method I mentioned is a comprimise because I'm nearly always wanting to weld the outside corners. That way one can grind them a touch to take the sharp point out.
                        Last edited by Thomas Harris; 03-02-2005, 06:46 AM.

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                        • #13
                          I have seen it suggested on this board that one use a block of wood as a spacer, and the block of wood can be cut along with the piece. Works great. Keep the pressure firm and consistent. No problemmo. Your chop saw will work fine, unless it is a total piece of junk, but a crummy band saw would let you down, too.

                          Chris

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                          • #14
                            I hope it is not off topic, but I was wondering if anyone here has any experience with those metal dry saws that use a carbide tipped blade.

                            I believe Dewalt and Millwuakee make them. How accurate are they when used to cut angles? How accurate are they in general?

                            I am thinking about gettting one and it would be nice to hear from some people that have used one.

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                            • #15
                              I'm going to throw in one other consideration for making angled cuts whether a circular abrasive blade or toothed blade and cutting steel or wood.

                              When cutting angles (45's) there is tremendous friction and pulling action going on. By that I mean that the direction the blade is rotating tends to 'pull' the piece into the blade on one side and twist the piece out on the other side. The 'pulling in' can be the culprit that makes things seem as tho the blade is having a terrible time cutting (which it is) but what is also happening is we then are getting an in feeding grinding process going on which is more than we wanted and the saw wants to do. If those two pieces are put back together and measured you might find that the amount removed is way more than the actual width of the blade and/or even curved a little.

                              In wood working you can feel this happen as the blade makes contact with the wood and can sometimes see it happening too late in the process. The curve effect may not be noticeable at a glance at the one 45 but when two done the same are then put together the cupped out cut is doubled and very obvious. Metal gives less cupping out and more of the grinding off effect.

                              In meatl working you can fill in with weldment. In wood working it looks like crap.

                              The partial answer is to make sure no angle cuts are done free hand. Clamp and clamp some more. Don't allow the metal/wood to be 'pulled in'.

                              10 cents worth here.

                              Last edited by Sandy; 03-03-2005, 12:36 AM.

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