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  • New to this board

    Stubled acrcoss this board a few days back and found tons of information.Great sight!!!! I have a HH 135 and have really enjoyed the machine(first wire feed).Would like to see a little more resistance on the wire speed dail, has tendancy to move when moving the machine.


    Now for my ?
    Whats the purpose of using shielding gas with fluxcore wire?
    Oh, a spell check wuold be nice.

  • #2
    What polarity does one use with the gas shielded fluxcore? Can you use either?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Rocky D
      What polarity does one use with the gas shielded fluxcore? Can you use either?
      DC+, DCRP, DCEP.
      MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
      Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


      PM 180C



      HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New to this board

        Originally posted by Bum
        Stubled acrcoss this board a few days back and found tons of information.Great sight!!!! I have a HH 135 and have really enjoyed the machine(first wire feed).Would like to see a little more resistance on the wire speed dail, has tendancy to move when moving the machine.


        Now for my ?
        Whats the purpose of using shielding gas with fluxcore wire?
        Oh, a spell check wuold be nice.
        A gas shielded flux core wire doesn t produce its own shielding to protect the molten puddle from the atmosphere. The ingredients in the core of the wire are mainly for deoxidizing, adding alloys, and fluxing out impurities. Plus it creates the slag cover,which helps protect the hot solidifying weld metal from the atmosphere. The slag also helps contain the molten puddle when welding out of position. Plus the slag also acts as insulation so that the weld metal will cool slower.

        More info then you asked for, but I was anticipating a second question about the ingredients in the core of the wire.
        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


        PM 180C



        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

        Comment


        • #5
          For one thing its for spray arc type welding.It also sprays at a lower voltage than solid wire.You can get some great looking welds out of it.Boy I really like the .045 316L fluxcore wire I picked up at a clearance sale from my welding store.It was $20.00 for a 25lb spool.list price is $12.00 per pound.It works great on mild steel also,but kind of a waste.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aweaver
            I did a search today to try and learn more. It appears to be most common in larger wire sizes, such as .045". Why is that? It would seem that if weld quality is improved, and with greater penetration, it would be ideal for the smaller welders in the 135A-175A range. I haven't had problems with my HH175, but sometimes I couldn't get enough penetration did with my HH135.
            Funny this should come up, I just saw a product today, made by J W HARRIS, labeled "Twenty Gauge brand" AWS designation E70C-6C, .030 cored wire for use with shielding gas (75% Ar, 25% CO2), I have not had a chance to run yet, I will let you know when I do. They are promoting as a better alternative for thin material to thick material, listed range is 28ga to 3/16, supposed to be no spatter. I am not aware of anyone else making something similar but if someone knows of something else please chime in.

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