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  • Need to run welder off of a generator

    I am searching for a small Stick Welder to be able to weld 2-3/8 and 2-7/8" diameter used well pipe for pipe fencing for my livestock operation. The wall thickness of the pipe will probably vary between 3/16" and 1/4". Am using both #1 Reject new well pipe and used well pipe with some rust. Also, occationally will be welding up to 1/4" plate. I have a portable generator with 6,000 peak and 5,000 continuous Wattage. Receptacles on the generator include 220 (240) Volt @ 20 Amps as well as 110 Volt @ 20 Amps. Is there any portable welder available that I can use with this set-up and welding jobs? Thanks for anyone's input! Bill.

  • #2
    You are going to have a hard time getting a Stick welder to run off that size generator. Most of the welders that are 220 take atleast 50 amps to run them and that would be a 10,000 watt or better generator. What you might look at is the Handler 175 which will do the 1/4 in material. Use flux core wire and it will penetrate the rust and paint.
    Thanks
    Dave Evans

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    • #3
      Hi, my Betamig 200 draws 18 amps using .035 wire at the fastest wire speed that I use. I have an Onan 5KW generator that will put out 21 amps. I would not have any problem running the Hobart with it. Yes, if you have a big machine running at full output, you need to supply the rated current.
      What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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      • #4
        Running Arrow
        With your input current limitations your best choice for a stick welder will probably be an inverter model. An example of such a machine would be a Miller Maxstar 140 STR . This machine would give you a 100 amps output @ 100% duty cycle from a input of 230 volts @ 20 amps. A 100 amps would put close to the right setting for 1/8" 6010, which is a good choice for a rod when the surface of the metal isn t perfectly clean. However if possible you should try an remove as much rust as possible. The main drawback to this machine is the price $750 + . Keep in mind though that I am not an expert on running this welder on a generator. If your interested in it I recommend that you contact Miller to verify its performance.
        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


        PM 180C



        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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        • #5
          need to run from generator

          Saw an unusal item on ebay, may fit your needs.
          Item #1855837558

          Though I havn't any personal experence with this product, I know of a farmer who has one on his pickup, and he likes it.
          steelhanger

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          • #6
            Running Arrow, I know you specifically said "stick" welding, but here's another option you might persue.

            www.readywelder.com

            They can essentially run off of any 12v DC power source (car battery), but they recommend a tandem of deep cycle marine cells. Adavntage over the zena is portability, as far as I can see. What if the vehicle it's attached to is not "available"?

            Good Luck
            Stevie
            http://www.news-corp.com

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            • #7
              I had a lincoln 225 ac machine that I ran off of a 5000 watt rated generator. It would only pull about 120 amps but I was able to do 1/8" 6011 rods. It took some skill to keep it running and you had to let the rods cool if you were doing anything other than a short weld. The rods would stick and heat up beyond the usability of the rod. I used it on some pipe fencing. If I had known then what I do now I probably would buy a wire welder and run it off the generator and use flux core wire. I do not know the requirements for the 220 wire machines but I think they would run well on the generator you are talking about. It takes less amps to weld with a .035 flux wire than it does to run 1/8" rods.

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              • #8
                Thanks for info! Also, someone else mentioned the Miller Maxstar 140 STR (small portable unit) that might work. On other hand, like the specs on the Hobart Champ 1435....as a combo generator/welder....but OUCH! the price. At $15 to 25 an hour for Welder guys around here would take a while (at the rate I plan to do some welding) to recover the $1,500 plus price of the Champ. But, there is the issue of "accessibility" need a welder when you need it. Thanks, Bill

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                • #9
                  Maxstar140

                  Miller Maxstar 140 is great a little welder. It can plug into 110 or 220 and now has socket for amptrol which makes it a better TIG welder.
                  The easy upgrade to TIG welding is what would sell me on this welder.

                  But you sound like there is lots of pipe to weld so HH175 using fluxcore wire is better for your stated use.
                  Last edited by Roger; 09-08-2002, 06:42 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for info on flux core things. I keep hearing a lot about wire feed welders...guess I'm not up on all the new stuff...seems like several suppliers I've visited sell wire feed units though. Guess my first impression (since I've never seen one in operation) is that it's a little complicated compared to just clamping in a "stick" and striking an arc and getting on with it. So, anyone out there that can enlighten me about pros and cons as well as methods on wire feed units will be greatly appreciated... Bill

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                    • #11
                      Hi Bill: I bought my Hobart machine over 15 years ago. I have not done any stick welding since. I use .035 wire with C02. Turn on the gas, turn on the welder, and weld. Thirty pounds of wire ready to go.

                      My first welder was a Linde buzz box. I converted it to a tig welder. I added a Lincoln high freq box. I also built a foot control using scr's on the 240v input.

                      I have three other wire feeders that I power from a 24v 100 amp regulated battery charger. I am working on a 28v 100 amp alternator to power a wire feeder for portable use.
                      What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Running Arrow
                        Thanks for info on flux core things. I keep hearing a lot about wire feed welders... So, anyone out there that can enlighten me about pros and cons as well as methods on wire feed units will be greatly appreciated... Bill

                        Bill, if you have stick experience you will have no trouble with MIG. There are videos you can get, and your local welding supply place should be able to set up to a demo. Check it out, you really need to see it first, and as you have questions, post them here we'll be glad to help. After all, we all had someone help us along the way.
                        Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
                        Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
                        IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
                        IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

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                        • #13
                          Hey Bill,
                          I am new to the wire stuff too. Only been wire welding for 4-5 months but have gone through 6lbs of wire. It takes some practice and I didn't much care for it at first compared to stick, but it will come with practice. There is a little more fine tuning to be done to get the right result. A method I use (through experience with my own machine) is to pick the voltage setting according to the thickness of the metal. I have a 110 volt unit that I picked specifically for its portability and it has settings 1-4. Then I adjust the wire speed according to how it is welding. With stick I was able to pretty much just leave the welder alone as long as I was using the same size and kind of electrode and just vary my speed according to the thickness. WIth the wire you have to fine tune it a little bit. The good thing is you will be able to weld the thinner stuff easier once you figure things out a bit. I must point out that I have only used flux-cored wire due to my welding outside as well as inside my shop. I still would not want to part with my miller nt 250 engine drive stick welder though.
                          Keep it sparkin
                          Mark

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                          • #14
                            Hi I need a generator to run an ironman 230

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                            • #15
                              You would need one no smaller than 10Kw. Hobart would recommend a 12.5Kw.

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