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Bad idea to paint (epoxy) shop/garage floor?

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  • Bad idea to paint (epoxy) shop/garage floor?

    I need to at least seal the concrete in my garage. I am considering painting the floor w/2 step epoxy. Is this a bad idea if I will be welding on top of it?

    Thanks ..............Kevin

  • #2
    I would think so.

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    • #3
      Kevin,
      I did mine and am very pleased with the results. I did it about 2 years and it has proven to be extremely durable. I did get the more expensive industrial epoxy. Also prep is the key! The concrete needs to be etched and then cleaned to the point that when you wipe your hand across the concrete you get absolutely no cement dust. I really spent alot of time with the prep but it payed off. I have drug metal across it and it hasn't even scratched. I also have welded on it without a problem all though I try to not weld directly on the floor. Hope this helps.
      Oley

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies.

        Oley, what brand did you use? Is it slippery when wet?

        Kevin

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        • #5
          i used paint from

          GROIT'S GARAGE

          i am very happy with it EXCEPT when i welded something sitting on the floor, it left some burn marks. i have dragged engines etc around on it and it still looks new. it is however slipery when wet, but in AZ it is not too often.

          later jim
          Dynasty 200 DX
          Spectrum 300
          MM 90
          next up to buy MM251

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          • #6
            Kevin,
            I have a little left in my shop so I will look for the brand and let you know. I bought it from Menards and at the time they had 3 qualities.(basement, garage, industrial) I bought the industrial and it comes in 2 parts, a gallon of each for $80.00. It cost me $160.00 for my 24X28 shop, so it not exactly cheap. It can be somewhat slick when wet, but it cleans up very nice. I see it in many industrial shops so osha must approve.
            Oley

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            • #7
              I painted my garage floor when I bought this house, because whoever had been living here before had made a godawful mess of it.

              I scrubbed the **** out of the grease stains with degreaser, washed everything down, and did it again the next day. I used a muriatic acid etch and washed that down. After that had dried throughly, I swept it again and damp mopped it to get any residual dust.

              I used a two part concrete paint. I found out it really took two coats to get the coverage that I wanted. So far it's been great (5 years+) Right at the overhead door the side stands of my sportbikes dragging on it when I take them down off the race stands have scarred it a little bit, but you wouldn't notice if you weren't looking for it.

              Stick welding is hard on it, spatter will leave burn marks so I usually try to do my welding outside the door when possible. I got my paint at Lowe's, can't remember the brand name at this point. Too much alcohol has passed between here and there
              Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
              Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

              Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

              Hobart HH 125EZ


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              • #8
                GARAGE FLOOR PAINT

                KevinB,

                Here's what my buddy did, and if the Gadget Garage ever looks as good as his place, I may do the same:

                His floor is epoxy painted. 'Tis beautiful. He bought a full sheet of 16ga. and painted one side with the same epoxy he has on the floor. We live in a seasonal climate - water under the steel sheet can be a problem, hence the paint. The top side is untreated. He welds with the project on top of the sheet, and it works great. When he doesn't need the protection, he picks it up and sticks it against the wall. Paint hasn't cracked from the flexing of the sheet.

                Be well.

                hankj
                ...from the Gadget Garage
                MM 210 w/3035, BWE
                HH 210 w/DP 3035
                TA185TSW
                Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
                Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

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                • #9
                  I'm with Rocky...
                  ...first, as sure as a duck is waterproof, epoxy will chalk when exposed to UV... stabilizers wont prevent it, only delay it. It has to do with quantum physics, but the epoxy isnt my first material of choice in UV exposure. Consider this with yor welding plans and you might be OK.

                  ...second, the burning and smoke it causes is undesireable and can be hazardous... same aforesaid consideration and yu might be OK.

                  ...third, it's a slip hazard in a shop, otherwise it's difficult to clean.

                  That's three, I think there are more.
                  Regards,
                  d

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                  • #10
                    definitely do the epoxy. you will not regret it. i do a lot of auto resto work as my hobby and have had engines dragged across the floor, the stuff is tough.

                    as mentioned above, prep is the key. I used the degreaser and washed it, damp mopped it, vac it etc. Used 2 coats of Benjamin Moore and the stuff is the bees knees.

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                    • #11
                      They painted our blast freezer floor at work last year with a 2 part epoxy. General paint product, Amerilock 2 I believe it was called. To increase the traction, they sprinkled a small amount of sand evenly over the surface, and then put down a second coat. And sprinkled a little more sand on that. Great product, stands up fairly well to all the forklift traffic and dragging skids all over it etc.

                      That floor , they shot blasted it to prepare it, some machine that uses small steel shot to pepper the floor and then they go over it with a magnet to pick it up.

                      We did another section in the plant this winter, with a 3 part polyurethane trowel on product. It goes down about 1/4" thick. This time they acid washed the floor and then pressure washed it after.

                      BB
                      Last edited by buzzbomber; 02-27-2004, 09:56 PM.
                      Why do we say something is out of whack? What is a whack?

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                      • #12
                        I must have got rid of what I had left but if my memory serves me I think the stuff I used was made by Rustoleum.
                        Oley

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by buzzbomber
                          They painted our blast freezer floor at work last year with a 2 part epoxy. General paint product, Amerilock 2 I believe it was called. To increase the traction, they sprinkled a small amount of sand evenly over the surface, and then put down a second coat. And sprinkled a little more sand on that. Great product, stands up fairly well to all the forklift traffic and dragging skids all over it etc.

                          That floor , they shot blasted it to prepare it, some machine that uses small steel shot to pepper the floor and then they go over it with a magnet to pick it up.

                          We did another section in the plant this winter, with a 3 part polyurethane trowel on product. It goes down about 1/4" thick. This time they acid washed the floor and then pressure washed it after.

                          BB
                          The garage in the motorpool I recall was NOT epoxy sealed, but it was sealed. The floor's finish resembled a well poured cement-rich concrete worked with a magnesium float... a deep natural grey. It gave excellent traction under a water spill, and footing on oil depended more on the shoe-sole than the floor. It was cleaned with a garden hose and squeegee, and dry within five to fifteen minutes. It took slag drops, solvents, abrasion and abuse without showing.

                          Better exists and its worthy of the search effort

                          If you are trying to hide spills & stains then I dunno.
                          Best of luck with your choice.
                          Regards,
                          d

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the replies. I'm still not sure what I'm gonna do. I'll decide soon.

                            Kevin

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                            • #15
                              I flagged the above post for spam, but since the thread was bumped:

                              Make sure you buy the SOLVENT-based epoxy floor coating. Rust-Oleum makes three grades of epoxy floor coating; their most expensive is the Professional Grade, and it's the solvent-based one. The others are water-based. I'd have never guessed they could both be considered epoxy.

                              I've got the kits to do my floors, but haven't done it yet. But I did do a LOT of research and glad I learned the difference.

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