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copper pipe glue??

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  • copper pipe glue??

    while enjoying a constitutional and perusing the sale papers, i came across something in the Ace Hardware circular "Just For Copper heatless copper pipe bonder", anyone familiar with this stuff?, does it work?, do you trust it? (i can't say i would), seems hokey to me, gluing your pipes, mebbee i'm wrong.

  • #2
    Hey, ya know, its a new age and they glue F-16's together for years now. Try it and get back to us, wouldja?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TEK View Post
      Hey, ya know, its a new age and they glue F-16's together for years now. Try it and get back to us, wouldja?
      nope, all my pipes are soldered or threaded and will remain as such, seriously though, i wouldn't trust it, sure it may work now, but what happens down the road when it degrades and all the joints inna floors and walls spring leaks?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Pumpkinhead View Post
        what happens down the road when it degrades and all the joints inna floors and walls spring leaks?
        You gonna get wet! But then I wouldn't put anything past Ace, even my kids refer to it as "the place with the helpless hardware folks."
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        • #5
          Several years ago, I was trying to solder a cap onto the end of a copper pipe that came up vertically in a wall through the slab. There was no way to get enough water out of the pipe so that I could heat it and not have the water boil over and out, even after a few days of trying various drying ideas.

          I tried a copper glue from Home Depot out of desperation. It's never leaked. I've also never tried it since.

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          • #6
            Find out if its Code approved in your area. This is important if it leaks later and you try a claim through your insurance. Not code your ins co will do battle to not pay you. if your luck is like mine it will leak from the 3rd floor while your away for 2 weeks and fill the basement. Not that this actually happened to me but that is how my luck runs. Uncrichie.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
              Several years ago, I was trying to solder a cap onto the end of a copper pipe that came up vertically in a wall through the slab. There was no way to get enough water out of the pipe so that I could heat it and not have the water boil over and out, even after a few days of trying various drying ideas.
              Did you try to stuff bread in to the pipe end?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lwj View Post
                Did you try to stuff bread in to the pipe end?
                Yep. But I'm no professional plumber. I've no idea if I did it right, or if there were other things I could have tried. But 9 years later, the darn glue is still working.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                  Several years ago, I was trying to solder a cap onto the end of a copper pipe that came up vertically in a wall through the slab. There was no way to get enough water out of the pipe so that I could heat it and not have the water boil over and out, even after a few days of trying various drying ideas.

                  I tried a copper glue from Home Depot out of desperation. It's never leaked. I've also never tried it since.
                  Next time that happens, try a compression fitting and cap that. Works every time and it's been tested by time.

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                  • #10
                    Well, I'll certainly ask for one, even though right now I can't picture that.

                    Maybe I'm just too stuck on electrical conduit compression fittings. Is it similar?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                      Well, I'll certainly ask for one, even though right now I can't picture that.

                      Maybe I'm just too stuck on electrical conduit compression fittings. Is it similar?
                      Same concept. It's a brass fitting with a tapered seat, a ring tapered on both outer edges and a collar with a tapered seat that thread on and tightens. You put the collar and the ring on the pipe and then put the pipe (with the ring on it) in the seat. When you tighten the collar, the brass ring is compressed around the pipe. When tightened properly, the ring compresses permanently around the pipe -- so tight it won't come off even when the collar is loosened (so once you put one of these on a pipe, you can loosen it and remove the pipe from the fitting for service, etc., but you can't get the ring back off the pipe).

                      The combination of this pressure around the pipe and the tapered seats makes a perfect seal between pipe, ring and tapered seats. No tape or dope needed (but always put a tiny bit of dope on to lube the threads).

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                      • #12
                        Oh, yeah! Okay, I'm totally picturing them now; in fact I've used them before. I just couldn't get the split-ring configuration of the electrical type out of my head long enough to remember them!

                        Heck, I was shopping for those parts not too long ago as I was building a Franzinator for my friend. I wound up flaring the tubing and using flare fittings instead, though.

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                        • #13
                          Water in Pipe & Soldering

                          Using bread is a good trick. However, you must make sure that it is the center portion of white bread. No crust, no wheat bread. You roll the bread into a "doughy" ball and stuff it into the pipe. Then quickly solder the fitting. Another technique is to use a length of tubing poked as far as possible into the pipe and suck the water out. Again, quickly solder the fitting.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
                            Several years ago, I was trying to solder a cap onto the end of a copper pipe that came up vertically in a wall through the slab. There was no way to get enough water out of the pipe so that I could heat it and not have the water boil over and out, even after a few days of trying various drying ideas.

                            I tried a copper glue from Home Depot out of desperation. It's never leaked. I've also never tried it since.
                            Here's how you handle that problem:

                            After cutting the water off at the main supply into the house/building, open 2 or 3 faucets wide open. Stick an air nozzle (wrapped with a rag) in the line and pull the trigger. The air/water has to have somewhere to go, so it follows the path of least resistance and drains out of the opened faucets.

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                            • #15
                              That's be worth a shot, too!

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