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  • Help me - please

    Let me start by apologizing - I am completely welding illiterate, but I have a question.

    My husband just obtained an old Craftsman Color-Matic Continuous Control Arc Welder, Model No. 113.201250. In the Owners Manual, it references a "Twin-Carbon Arc Torch." Does anyone know where I can locate one of these - or even if it is possible?

  • #2
    The last place I saw selling those was JC Whitney, so you might try their site and call up "welding".
    "Good Enough Never Is"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mjnbburg View Post
      Let me start by apologizing - I am completely welding illiterate, but I have a question.

      My husband just obtained an old Craftsman Color-Matic Continuous Control Arc Welder, Model No. 113.201250. In the Owners Manual, it references a "Twin-Carbon Arc Torch." Does anyone know where I can locate one of these - or even if it is possible?
      I'm going from a point of ignorance myself , but If yourhusband is just going to weld in the ordinary sence , I don't think you need such a torch , I think it is a heat source that does not convey electricity to the work peice ????????

      I could be off the beam on this admittedly
      sigpicViceGrip
      Negative people have a problem for every solution

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      • #4
        I have never used one either, someone probably has one they willing to part with if you find you really need it.
        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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        • #5
          I am not sure if he "needs" one....but he wants one ...I checked J.C. Whitney - nothing there that I could find. Thanks for the leads though.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mjnbburg View Post
            I am not sure if he "needs" one....but he wants one ...I checked J.C. Whitney - nothing there that I could find. Thanks for the leads though.
            Jewelry Industry !!!!!????? Maybe so you can tig , except it would be cig , and not melt tiny welds????????
            sigpicViceGrip
            Negative people have a problem for every solution

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            • #7
              A source!

              Here you go!
              http://www.weilerwelding.com/shopsit...ml/carbon.html

              Now, you youngsters apparently never saw one used, but they sold them at Western Auto, etc., and I know of at least one guy back in my EARLY hot rod days who was doing some welding aon a '41 Ford with his Carbon Arc torch. The arc melts the metal, and I THINK an arc rod is in the other side of a "V" . Its like a stinger on a stick machine with two rods at that "V" angle, one of which is a carbon , used for striking and maintaining the arc with the opiece. All movie theaters use carbon arcs in their projectors back then, as well (early 50's).
              Last edited by Hotfoot; 09-12-2006, 03:14 PM.
              "Good Enough Never Is"

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              • #8
                Maybe Praxair: [url]https://ecatalog.praxair.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?catalogId=10001&storeId=10551&cate goryId=11039&langId=-1&parent_category_rn=10763

                « Carbon Arc Torch

                Praxair Part Number: LINL2645
                Manufacturer Part Number: L2645

                Brand Name: Lincoln Electric
                UOM: EA

                Increases versatility of the welder. Some applications include welding aluminum and copper alloys, heating, bending and straightening, brazing and soldering. Convenient thumb control. Rated at 100A at 40V. °

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                • #9
                  this is what he wants, better known as a sunburn machine, "**** that's bright" https://weldingsupply.securesites.co...DEF:OR:K1876-1

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                  • #10
                    www.mcmaster.com has them as well...search 'carbon arc' or go to catalog pg. 3187...a little pricier than above.

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                    • #11
                      Hotfoot is pretty close, but apparently is a youngster himself. Doesn't sound like he's used one much, Lucky Him.
                      The 20th Century Dad bought when I was a youngster came with a carbon arc torch. It consisted of two carbon rods about 1/2" diameter arranged in a \ / with the electrode cable hooked to one torch lead and the ground cable hooked to the other torch lead. When the ends of the rods were touched together it started a large arc between the two rods that could be used to heat metal. The rods burned very slowly. It was a rather slow process and a gas welder was 100 times better which is probably the reason the carbon torches are pretty hard to find today, but it was better than nothing. I wouldn't waste the money on one, but if it's the only way he is going to have to heat metal, it might be OK. The rods may be hard to find on a local basis.
                      I also ran projectors in the theater in the late 60's when I was in college and the screen was illuminated by carbon arc torches. Fans sucked air through the projector housings to exhaust the smoke. I made a few bucks and got to see all the movies too.

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                      • #12
                        Oh yeah, I can still feel the burn. Back when Shep was a pup an Moby **** was a minnow, my bud and I purchased one of those rigs out of a mag., complete w/a pair of fabirc goggles. Was a chore learning to weld w/it but for us and our projects, overlooking the fact we had to wear raccoon face to school , it did ok.
                        Later in the early '60 at the same bud's fab shop, we used a single carbon stick for "brazing" galvanized wire ways, this time I had a hood,
                        I to would not fool w/the sticks.
                        Good luck
                        L*S

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