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  • New Metal Cutting Blade Available

    Thought you guys mite be interested in this new metal cutting blade that has just came out.

    I'm sure most all of you have heard of the MK Morse Company.
    Here is their index page:


    For information about their metal cutting blades go here:


    On this page they also have demonstrations of the blade in action. It is quite remarkable! Just click on the "Seeing is Believing" option.

    What do you guys think of this?
    I'm still shaking my head, it's so hard to believe that it's that easy, that it can even be done...............!

    Cheers,
    Mike
    Last edited by Mike360000; 05-05-2003, 12:04 PM.

  • #2
    Looks interesting. I wonder where they can be purchased?

    Bob
    Short Term Memory GONE!!
    Hobby Weldor/Machinist
    Photobucket Shop Pics

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    • #3
      Um... that's not really new... it's just the same blade you'd find on a cold-saw... per their website: "While best performance is achieved using a special metal-cutting saw, the Metal Devil™ improves the performance of standard power saws as well."

      Cold saws turn slower than standard circular saws. I've got the Dewalt 872, and it's basically the same thing.


      The downsides are:
      1) blades are $80-100 each
      2) they are VERY loud
      3) the clamp on them isn't worth a spit. I've survived (with all body parts in tact) 2 nearly catastrophic failures that happened because the clamp was faulty. It's not an experience I'd like to repeat.
      4) it COVERS your shop with SHARP/HOT metal filings (a LOT of cleanup).

      They run about $400 or so, for the same money you can get into a decent band-saw. Now that I have my bandsaw, I haven't even plugged in the coldsaw.
      It's all fun and games until somebody gets shot in the leg. -- Armageddon

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      • #4
        Originally posted by deere_x475guy
        Looks interesting. I wonder where they can be purchased?

        Bob
        Only 1 place that I know at the moment:
        I ordered 1 from Sussex Saw & Tool
        960 Nassau Rd., Lewes, Delaware 19958
        1-888-459-4008 ~ Fax 302-644-4076

        Website:


        I ordered a 7" "heavy metal" blade. It costs 53 bux plus shipping.
        Prices for other sizes will vary from the 7" I ordered.

        I had ordered from them before and a guy named John Henderson owns/runs the place. You will need to call and ask for him, to tell him what you are specifically interested in, because:
        1) It isn't listed on the website yet.
        2) Because it is so new a product.
        3) Because it is so new he has to call and foreward the order straight to the manufacture. (Which he does for most of his MK Morse orders anyways.)

        Mine was shipped out the same day I ordered, today. So getting it forewarded shouldn't be any problem.

        Cheers,
        Mike

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        • #5
          I've posted on this before when the talk came up about cheaper solutions than plasma for linear cutting and miter cuts.
          Dry cut saws all used blades created by tenryu. And yes, they are available for circular saws: 1 blade for 0-.125" , and another for 0.125-0.25". Rocky D. has a saw that uses similar blades. Freud is now also making blades in this arena. Saw them at the local HD for $40. Tenryu blades cost that on line as well.

          Tenryu is known around the globe as the premier manufacturer of quality saw blades. Tenryu makes over 3,000 types of carbide blades for woodworking, metalworking, plastic cutting and machining other composite materials.


          -dseman

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          • #6
            Bluesman2a

            "Um... that's not really new..."
            Actually your right from the standpoint that similar blades already existed. However this blade "supposedly" has addressed all the problems you mentioned except the loudness factor. If they really have overcame the other problems associated with the other similar blades, that is what I think is as amazing as anything, and it still cut steel the way it was demonstrated.

            Actually I also called MK Morse to inquire about this blade before I ordered 1 this morning.

            Cheers,
            Mike

            PS The main thing that interests me about this is the fact I would have something to cut *deep* into 1/8"-1/4" plate/sheet steel with. You just can't do that with a bandsaw!
            Last edited by Mike360000; 05-05-2003, 12:36 PM.

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            • #7
              tenryu has 2 lines under 'steelpro'. The quieter blades have a 2 piece construction with a dampening material between the 2 blade halves. I think they are called the steelpro select and are available in 7.25,10,12,14".
              -dseman

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              • #8
                The Hitachi blade that came in my Hitachi dry cut saw is much quieter than the Dewlt blade I bought for an extra blade. Overall the Hitachi saw is much more solid than the Dewalt, but it costs more. The clamp is good and the Miter guage is accurate etc....

                I looked up the 14" Tenryu blades and they were around $139.

                Hand held:

                TCT saws or dry cut saws use carbide tipped blades for quick, clean metal cutting. Cleaner cuts and lower cost per cut than abrasive chop saws!
                www.shrockworks.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Shrock
                  The Hitachi blade that came in my Hitachi dry cut saw is much quieter than the Dewlt blade I bought for an extra blade. Overall the Hitachi saw is much more solid than the Dewalt, but it costs more. The clamp is good and the Miter guage is accurate etc....

                  I looked up the 14" Tenryu blades and they were around $139.

                  Hand held:

                  http://www.vansantent.com/metal_cutting_saw.htm
                  I personally avoid ALL Black & Decker tools and products, including Dewalt which is made by Black & Decker. I think they are too over-rated.

                  I have only used abrasive blades to cut metal sheet, when I had to, and then it was a messy chore. And anything 3/16" or over I couldn't use the blades anyways. I had read some about these metal blades about a month ago when I was looking at chop and portable band saws. I was sure that was the way to go at the time, but there were some concerns. Still neither would cut deep into sheet steel unless I put the metal blade on a circular saw, which I was uncomfortable doing at the time. After seeing MK Morse's demo and after calling them with some followup questions I felt much better. This was considering what they said, about putting one of their metal Devil blades on my circular saw.

                  We shall soon see.

                  Cheers,
                  Mike
                  Last edited by Mike360000; 05-06-2003, 09:54 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well I finally tried out that Metal Devil blade yesterday. My thoughts on it:

                    I fitted it on a Makita SkilSaw. Makita's turn up more RPM's than most other SkilSaws. (I say this in reference to the earlier post concerning RPMs.)

                    First thing I noticed when mounting the blade is, I had a problem. The Metal Devil comes with a 20mm arbor instead of a 5/8 arbor that is found on most SkilSaws. I simply centered the blade.

                    I used the blade to cut a 4 foot strip of 1/8 sheet, which I cut 3 inches wide.

                    The cutting itself was extremely smooth, requiring almost no effort to the SkilSaw. The blade cut at what I thought was an extremely fast rate of speed, compared to abrasive wheels.

                    I got hit by 2 metal chips during the cut. On my arm. The chips weren't hot, nor did they hurt or bother me in any way. I looked for metal chips afterwards but all I could find was very tiny flakes. Slightly bigger than sawdust.

                    The only thing I noticed in cutting was the SkilSaw could not be guided from side to side, tracking from either side of the line I laid out to cut the metal. The saw and blade did not like it at all if you yawed or tried to twist on your cut. I think the reason for this was explained in MK Morse's demos. The blades have no degrees of rake.

                    There was viritually no heat from this cutting operation. The metal, just after being cut was only warm to the touch.

                    The sound from cutting, IMHO, was not much *if any* louder than that from a loud SkilSaw blade when cutting wood. (Some woodcutting blades can be pretty loud.)

                    Conclusion is I really loved the results I got using this blade. It is infinitely better than the abrasive wheels. But I need to figure out why the arbor differences, in size. I hope to be retiring my abrasive wheels.

                    Cheers,
                    Mike
                    Last edited by Mike360000; 05-16-2003, 08:31 AM.

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                    • #11
                      It's inseresting to see the saws they are using in their demos are the Evolution 180 and the 230. I have the 180 .....there is no finer piece of equipment than one of those saws...a real time saver!

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                      • #12
                        While I'm in this post, let me ask if ANYONE has seen where I can get this saw guide. I have searched all over...I'm just not looking in the right place, I guess.

                        This saw guide is indespensable with the Evolution saws or any other saws that cut metal. Ti's a steel protractor, 18" long and is excellent for making angle cuts and 90" as well, on pipe, angle or flat bar.

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                        • #14
                          I would use wire wheels on air grinder that had over sized hole for spindle. Used narrow slice of tube to fill space and center wheel. O-ring also worked.

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                          • #15
                            Thanks Shrock...right on!

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