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  • attaching cable lugs

    i just got some cable lugs off ebay

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...&category=6755

    i want to attach them to the cable that goes to the electrode and ground clamp

    these lugs can be crimped or soldered

    which would be the easyest way to attach the lugs to the cable ends?

    if i solder the lug, can i solder it with a soldering gun or do i need a tourch?

    if i crimp it on, do i need a crimping tool for these lugs?

  • #2
    The torch got my (#1) copper wire too warm for my taste.
    I ended up using a BFH and a VERY DULL chisel to crimp mine with...
    It works!!!
    ;-)
    Last edited by W8KI; 02-02-2005, 04:45 PM. Reason: edit
    Russ
    MM175, 300/200 Thunderbolt,
    Miller Spectrum 125C, HH 125 EZ,
    Victor Super-Range O2/fuel,
    BWE,
    and...
    lots-of-junk slowly being replaced
    {previous login was KC8DZV, changed on 10.10.07)

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    • #3
      cant i just smash the lug in my vice?

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      • #4
        That would be less then satisfactory.
        What do I know I am just an electronics technician.

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        • #5
          If you have the crimping tool this is acceptable but soldering is best. I have a couple of splices that I crimped using a crimper and the conductive gell. These have worked fine but I would rather have had soldered joints. Its easy to do and you really should have at least a small propane torch. This will also help you get more penetration with preheating. Get a cheap nozzle and a $2 disposable tank. You could prolly even use one of those crack torches.
          I don't care what size, just hand me a wrench I'm gonna use it as a hammer.

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          • #6
            well i could place a small piece of angle iron so it pushes the center of the lug in instead of crushing the whole thing

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            • #7
              Originally posted by diesel
              You could prolly even use one of those crack torches.
              got one of those from radioshack

              solder gun/torch

              any electrical solder will do for this?
              i have clear flux and rosin core

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              • #8
                You could prolly even use one of those crack torches

                Spit coffee all over my monitor thanks to you.
                The Maniacal Migging Guy {as Hankj would put it}


                HH180
                Cutmaster 51

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                • #9
                  Lugs are not necessicarily either/or solder/crimp. A lug that is accepable for soldering will have a bleed-hole at the far (cable) end. A crimp-type lug MAY have a hole at the cable end; it's usually to determine if the cable is bottomed in the lug. They are not interchnageble as far as mechanical strength is concered. Electricaly, I don't guess there'd be little difference if you soldered a crimp-type, or vice-versa.

                  To make a "good" crimp, you need the tool that is recommended for the lug. T&B, Hilti, Greenlee, and Burndy are a few of the biggies. The tooling ain't cheap. A Burndy hydraulic crimper for 800MCM costs $1800. I used to have two. Long time ago...


                  Hank
                  ...from the Gadget Garage
                  MM 210 w/3035, BWE
                  HH 210 w/DP 3035
                  TA185TSW
                  Victor O/A "J" series, SuperRange
                  Avatar courtesy of Bob Sigmon...

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                  • #10
                    If you have the correct crimping tool, crimping is best. Otherwise soldering will work, but on the larger cables is a definite skill. If soldering, DO NOT overheat. Strip the cable back to leave about 1/8" exposed wire outside the crimp when the cable is fully in. Support the cable so it won;t move in the crimp, heat the crimp evenly, and feed solder into the wire, right at the edge of the crimp, when the assembly reaches a temp that will melt it. The molten solder will wick in. stop when the solder won't wick anymore. Feed evenly and smoothly, don't shove it in too fast, as the molten solder helps carry heat throuought the joint. Do not aow the joint to move until th solder has set through, or the joint will heat in use.

                    Hammer crimp tools are inexpensive. Maybe $20. Work well. Hydraulic type is best. Don't use a chisel or a punch. You won't like the result.
                    I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

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                    • #11
                      I usually take it to my local welding shop and let them crimp it for me. They have a tool and it does it very neatly.
                      tjb

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                      • #12
                        I did some with my disposable crimping device. I cut a nut the same size as the lug barrel in half and put it around the barrel, put the wire in, put it in the vice and cranked it down. The nut was good for about four crimps before it statred to deform too much. It seems to have made a good crimp and the threads left a nice pattern on the lug.

                        BMB

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                        • #13
                          Moody - I'd solder them - makes for total contact!
                          Can't let a little fire scare ya, after all - you're a weldor!!!!!!

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                          • #14
                            BMB - cool idea with the "disposable crimper" - looks neat too!

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                            • #15
                              I use a vice with two blocks of steel that I ground a groove into. It takes a surprisingly great amount of force to really crimp most large lugs. I also make my own lugs out of copper pipe squashed down flat.

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