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which shade to use?

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  • which shade to use?

    I recently inherited a full screen cheepy welding helmet with plastic lenses that where scratched, I replaced them with glass, number 10 shade. really made a difference. Clearer and a little brighter, should i be using a number 11 shade?(for saftey)? haven't got sore eyes yet. chumly.

  • #2
    You need to let us know what process and amperage you are using to be able to give you a good answer. I say that shade 10 is a good shade for most MIG and stick welding and if your eyes are not sore you are probably under the amperage level that requires an 11.
    AtoZ Fabrication, Inc.
    Miller MM210--now X2
    Hypertherm 380
    Miller autodark hood

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    • #3
      I have a mm175 and weld mostly 1/8" and 3/16". Some 1/4". It's just a hobbie for me. chumly.

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      • #4
        lens shade

        You should be OK with #10. I like the gold mirror lens when using a regular hood. The mirror lets ambient light in so that you can do more with the hood down. If outdoors or in good indoor lighting I cna strike the arc w/o having to raise and lower the hood.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the tip, I'll have to look for that type of lens. chumly.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by chumly
            I have a mm175 and weld mostly 1/8" and 3/16". Some 1/4". It's just a hobbie for me. chumly.
            Everyone's eyes are different....I use a #9 for most of the stuff I do in MIG and heavy TIG....for light TIG I use an 8 shade lens. The object is to be able to see all around your puddle and some of the surround area. If you can't, then go to a lighter shade. Your eyes will hurt by straining to see, just as much as if the lens is too light. Neither situation is permanent, or dangerous.

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            • #7
              I had mine Hobart hood set to 10 and my eyes would be sore afterwards. I switch to 11 and it seems to work great. Even though it is a hobbie I would recomend ya get a good helmet. I started out with a cheap one and when I switched it made a world of difference. Its one of those "why didn't I do this sooner?" deals.
              Art is dangerous!
              www.PiedmontIronworks.com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rocky D


                Everyone's eyes are different....I use a #9 for most of the stuff I do in MIG
                same here, but I use the gold lens

                ~Nate~
                NCLS LLC.~ Big Nate's Plowing
                ~~~~~~ I like a nice piece of SCRAP~~~~~~
                NCLS LLC- SMR Division (Scrap Metal Recycling)
                I FOUND A CHEAP TIG :~D

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                • #9
                  A #9 or #10 shade should do well for you. Unless you're using higher amperage, a #11 may seem a little dark and make it harder to see what you're doing a lower amps.

                  The main thing is if the helmet is comfortable? Does it fit well, function and stay where you want it when you're working? Cause if you're happy with it you can concentrate on what you are suppose to be doing. Otherwise it will become an annoyance and at some point in time you will chuck it or accidently drop the hammer on it a few dozen times.

                  Some equipment just needs to be right.
                  Snidley :}
                  Here in the Great White North
                  Mosquitoes can't fly at 40 below

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                  • #10
                    lens shade

                    I also prefer the gold lenses I generally use a#12 for stick I fell I can see my puddle better and an #11 for most mig welding

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                    • #11
                      I like gold filter but they will let unwanted uv/ir light pass through scratch that removes gold film. Scratch on other filters just affects sharpness of vision.

                      You still need protective plastic lens covering your glass or plastic filter. Keep spairs as they take all the abuse and should be cheap to replace.

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