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  • TIG conversion

    I have a PowCon 250 amp DC inverter with wire feed. What are my options to convert to TIG?

  • #2
    Cope, does that machine have constant current? If not, you are pretty much out of luck. Any constant current machine can be easily converted to a scratch start tig, constant voltage wire feeders cannot.
    Respectfully,
    Mike Sherman
    Shermans Welding

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    • #3
      CV VS CC

      Mike, its my understanding that this machine does both. The basic inverter is a stick machine and has a three way switch for stick/GMAW/FCAW-Spray Transfer. In corresponding with Arc Products they mentioned that a torch mounted remote is available for TIG. I have a spare flowmeter and hose and can get a cylinder full of Argon from a friend on long term loan; just need whatever else it takes to set it up.

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      • #4
        If it doesn't have gas solenoid, you need a TIG torch with gas valve on the end of your welding lead. A torch mounted or foot operated amptrol makes TIG welding much easier. Without HF you will have to scratch start your arc.

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        • #5
          Re: CV VS CC

          Originally posted by cope
          Mike, its my understanding that this machine does both. The basic inverter is a stick machine and has a three way switch for stick/GMAW/FCAW-Spray Transfer. In corresponding with Arc Products they mentioned that a torch mounted remote is available for TIG. I have a spare flowmeter and hose and can get a cylinder full of Argon from a friend on long term loan; just need whatever else it takes to set it up.
          You have the flow meter, hose, and a bottle of gas. So now what you need is a an air cooled TIG torch. Im going to assume that the machine doesn t have a solenoid valve on it for shutting the gas on and off. So, if this is true, you need a torch that has an on and off valve on the body of the torch to control your gas flow. Also if the machine doesn t have a gas solenoid inside you will need the torchs power cable and gas line to be seperate from one another. These are generally advertised as a 2 piece cable. Along with the torch you need the accessories that go with the torch these includes cups, collet bodies, collets, and back caps. You should only need 1/16" and 3/32" tungstens, collet bodies and collets. #5 and #7 cups should give a couple good sizes to start with . For back caps I would get any length available for the torch size you choose to go with. My personal preference as a first torch would be a 125 amp. After this I would add a 150 amp and if necessary a 200amp.

          If your machine doesn t have high freq or lift arc your going to have to scratch start the tungsten.

          So your guarnteed that a foot pedal is not an option?

          If the hand control is the only option for a remote, I might think about passing on it, but thats just my opinion because I have a difficult time using the slide version that I have at work for my option when I can t operate the foot pedal. I guess though if I used it as much as I do the foot pedal I might get a better feel for it over time . However it does limit you to certain ways that you can only hold the torch and operate the remote.

          Almost forgot to metion for steel and stainless steel I use a 2% thoriated tungsten. This isn t your only option for these metal it was just the standard when I was taught, and I guess I ve just been stubborn about switching to a non radioactive tungsten.

          I have more info, but my son wants to play his bingo game. Sorry he is more important. Im attaching a picture of an example torch that has the valve and 2 piece cable.
          Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 08:18 AM.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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          • #6
            Torches

            Cope,be sure to check out the weldcraft WP-9-P torch.I think thats the number?Anyway,the one I have on order is the 180 degree model.It has a removeable head,so you can put on a 70/90/flex head,and up to a 150 amp head on it.The power cable is the same in the 125/150 amp torches.Get the two piece torch cable setup,because it flexes much easier.I only bought one extra 70 degree head for $20.00.It will be cheaper in the long run just buy that one first.Then buy a WP26 if you think your going to weld thicker type metal.I do have one with a valve for lift arc tig with my engine drive.I think they have more heads for the WP-9P then I listed.I think its a cool setup.

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            • #7
              TIG

              Scott and Dan,
              The unit has a solenoid for MIG, activated by the trigger on my MIG gun, but don't see how I can activate it with TIG torch. The remote on the back will work with foot or hand control. I am about to get a hand remote for stick if the price is right but I think I would prefer the torch mount for TIG. I had a Lincoln 225 amp AC/DC/TIG on an Onan 6KW gen set but a friend wanted it pretty badly so I sold it. His welder has managed to fry something inside, so I may be able to get the TIG part of it back. May be possible to run the High Frequency box from my PowCon.

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              • #8
                Within last year someone posted on this board link to company that sells foot pedals for most any welder. I have also seen people adapt sewing machine foot control pedal to welding machine use by installing correct value potentiometer, cord, and plug. A pedal for older sewing machine works better as they have more room for modifications.
                Last edited by Roger; 02-09-2003, 10:22 AM.

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                • #9
                  Foot pedal

                  Roger,your post on foot pedals brought up something I was going to post.Here is something for Miller to do.I just thought I would give them first crack at it.Only because I been mean to them sometimes.

                  While at the dentist office to get my teeth cleaned,something caught my eye.The girl there using a air powered tool that had a electric foot pedal that was interesting.It was kind of domed shaped,and you could step on it from any angle to make it work.It was a very low profile setup,and seemed like a very nice way to control the arc for out of position tig work.Anybody that does not like torch sliders it could be a pretty good way to go.

                  Ok Miller,go to it.

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                  • #10
                    I have a switch on my router table that is a air switch. It has a half round ball with a diaphragm in it that you step on to activate. It is connected via a tube to a air switch receptacle that the router is plugged into. It is only 15A 120V so maybe it would not work for what you need.
                    bitternut

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                    • #11
                      SCOTT V................YOUR NOT ANY MEANER TO US THAN YOU ARE ANYONE ELSE..........THIS IS AN OPEN FORUM.......... I TOO LOOKED AT ONE OF THOSE DENTAL AIR TOOLS YOUR TALKING ABOUT.....HOWEVER AFTER ORDERING ONE FORM THE LOCAL MEDICAL CATALOGUE IT WORKED SUPREMELY GOOD WHEN BUFFING METAL..............HOWEVER WITH A DREMEL IT DID THE SAME AND WAS LESS EXPENSIVE,....... THE ONE I USED WAS FOR AIR...........HAVEN'T SEEN ANY NEW ONES IN AWHILE..........ROCK
                      [email protected]

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