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  • education question...

    I'm reading this book called" fundamentals of welding technology" and it says i have to have a high school diploma and must know advanced algerbra,geometry and be highly skilled in math. Now, i'm a high school drop-out but i am going to a small local trade school to learn Arc,Mig and Tig welding.
    The people at the school said i didn't need a diploma.
    I mean i'm not dumb, i have a lot of common sense and i grasp physics very well.
    Is a high school diploma really necessary if i have been certified as an arc,mig,tig welder?????
    Thanx~~Andy
    "My nose runs and my feet smell, you think it would be the other way around" ----Ralph Bean (welding teacher)

  • #2
    Re: education question...

    Originally posted by welderpunk
    I'm reading this book called" fundamentals of welding technology" and it says i have to have a high school diploma and must know advanced algerbra,geometry and be highly skilled in math. Now, i'm a high school drop-out but i am going to a small local trade school to learn Arc,Mig and Tig welding.
    The people at the school said i didn't need a diploma.
    I mean i'm not dumb, i have a lot of common sense and i grasp physics very well.
    Is a high school diploma really necessary if i have been certified as an arc,mig,tig welder?????
    Thanx~~Andy
    Andy,

    Generally, in my area a GED is the minimal requirement. The local community college that I took my Welding program classes at required at least a GED to enter the program.

    Now if you want a welding job beyond a production worker level, you need more than just the welding process classes. Blue print reading and layout are important classes too. Math too is very important. Now I wouldn t state that you need an advanced level in algebra, geometry or trigonometry. Math classes I took were Basic concepts in algebra, intro to geometry, and intro to triginometry. Of these three I use geometry the most. I would say that I use the Pythagorean theorem at least 2 or 3 times a month and other areas of geometry at different times in every project I design and build.
    MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
    Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


    PM 180C



    HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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    • #3
      Hi Andy,

      It is not unreasonable that companies would require a minimum education level of HS Diploma. It speaks of your perseverance. motivation, and ability to finish tasks. If I were interviewing you I would be very interested in why you didn't finish High School. (I'm NOT asking for that explanation now, please...)

      Regarding the math and blueprint reading skills I would think that any accredited trade school would offer classes like these. They want to build a reputation of turning out qualified weldors to the area and these would be part of a minimum skills set for a weldor. If they do offer them then take them. If you are good at math as you say then they will be easy, but at least it will let you know what kind of calculations are expected, and may show you easier ways of doing things.

      I agree with everything Dan said, and just want to emphasize one of his points. A weldor with math, metallurgy and hands-on technique can go as far in the welding field as their experience allows. Technique alone will not get you far beyond sitting in a little production welding booth all day welding the same parts on the same fixture...

      Good Luck and aim high!!!
      Bill C
      "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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      • #4
        Your small local trade school will know local procedure to get GED High School Diploma.

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        • #5
          I too, was a high school drop-out....all my classes were shop classes and I didn't have enough credits to pass....however the US Army gave me the GED and I passed and got welding school in Aberdeen Proving Ground in MD, and got paid for it.

          Dan has hit the nail on the head, about math...geometry is a must, as is blue print reading. My boss hands me a blue print and says "build it"...I then have to make a cuttng list, of material, order it, when it comes in, I have to cut it and fit it and weld it. Or, you could stay as you are, and weld 'I' beams all day....not to cap on 'I' beam welders....but it, to me, is boring.

          The Navy has an excellent school as does the Army....and lots of M.R.E.'s , too!

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          • #6
            WELDERPUNK..........DO NOT GET DISCOURAGED, A GED IS NOT HARD TO OBTAIN, IT IS JUST SOMETHING THAT IS NEEDED, IN TODAYS MARKETPLACE USUALLY..SOMETIMES PEOPLE GET LUCKY WITHOUT ONE, SOMETIMES NOT... IT IS SOMETHING I WOULD CONSIDER GETTING IF I WERE YOU, I READ YOUR STATEMENT ABOUT WHY IN AN EARLIER ISSUE. EVERYONE IS HERE TO HELP......... THE TRADE SCHOOL YOUR GOING TO CAN GET YOU INFO ON THIS AND I'LL BET THERE IS SOMEONE WHO CAN LEAD YOU IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION THERE.....
            YOU WILL USE A GOOD DEAL OF MATH IN THIS BUSINESS, PHYSICS, METALURGY, GEOMETRY,................ALL THESE THINGS WILL COME YOUR WAY WITH THE PROPER TRAINING.........TRAINING IS THE KEY........................ EXPERIENCE IS SOMETHING THAT COMES WITH MANY DIFFERENT JOBS AND YOUR MENTAL ABILITY'S AND GENERAL DEMENOR WILL CONVEY THAT. AFTER A LEARNING CURVE IN WELDING YOU WILL JUST GRIN WHEN PEOPLE ASK YOU CAN YOU DO THIS OR CAN YOU FIX THIS..............IT'S A GRIN YOU GET WHEN YOU SAY OF COURSE..... HOWEVER MANY TIMES YOU WILL SET BACK AND LAUGH AT THE MISTAKES YOU WILL ALSO MAKE ALONG THE WAY....... JUST HOPE IT DOESN'T HURT SOMEONE......................HEY DO YOU THINK I SHOULD BE A PHILOSOPHER HERE OR LEARN TO SPELL FIRST
            ROCK...........[email protected]

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            • #7
              Maybe if i start going to classes, when it's time for me to get a job welding, they'll aknowledge my GED classes i'd be attending...i hope so.
              You guys are all GREAT! Thanks again for all your inputs and help. Later~~Andy
              "My nose runs and my feet smell, you think it would be the other way around" ----Ralph Bean (welding teacher)

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