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  • your experiences as a welder

    I am writing a novel about a welder. Anything you might tell me about your personal experiences as a welder would help me make the work more believable. I'd particularly like to know what frustrates you and what thrills you about welding.
    jab

  • #2
    First, I would suggest that you gain some personal experience and then use your writing talents to translate your experience into words. You should be able to nose around and find someone to let you try welding.
    Secondly, I would have a conversation with the person you found to help you try welding to help you formulate informed questions to ask other welders.
    Some other tips:
    I have heard that the book, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, contains a reference to the welding experience.

    My limited anecdotal experience tells me that there is a difference in the way people describe welding between people who learn to weld at an early age (11-15 years old) and those folks who learn to weld later in life. This is akin to the age-related experiences in learning to ride a unicycle. I'm pretty far out in the weeds now

    You might want to explore the viewpoints of the various levels of welder expertise. As a hobby welder I enjoy different things than a professional experiences.

    Good luck with your research.
    John

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    • #3
      jab:
      Where do you live in New Mexico? I was born in Raton and grew up in Albuquerque.
      John

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      • #4
        jab,
        I'm not trying to be a jerk (happens naturally) but as a writer you should use the correct terminology. A welder is a machine, a weldor is a person that uses a welder.
        Just trying to help,
        Mike

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        • #5
          welder/weldor

          Kind of off topic but I had to jump in here on this one.

          I'm and engineer that some how ended up working for a technical magazine. The editors that I work with are not techical unfortunately and can be very picky about "words" so I've butted heads on this type of thing.

          While using the term "weldor" to signify the person using the "welder" makes perfect sense to me and probably everyone who "welds", the powers that be have generally not accepted "weldor" as a proper English word. Because of this a lot of editors will probably reject the word because they can't find it in a dictionary. I know, I know, an entire industry can use a term but if it doesn't make it into the dictionary it's not a "real word" according to these people.

          Amazingly Homer Simpson's "Doh" is now a recognized word but an industry accepted term such as "weldor" isn't. Just a word of warning in case you ever decide to but heads with someone on it.

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          • #6
            Great, I work for a magazine and I mess up the second sentence even after proof reading it (and/an).

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            • #7
              JAB........BEEN IN THIS INDUSTRY FOR 27 YEARS OR THEIR ABOUTS....SORRY HAD TO SLIP THAT IN.......TRY THIS FIND SOME TRADE SCHOOL, A PLUMBERS PIPE FITTERS UNION, OR A STEAM FITTERS UNION AND GET TO KNOW THE INSTRUCTORS...... IT HAS BEEN MY EXPERIENCE THESE TRADESMAN GET AROUND A LOT AND HAVE WONDERFUL STORY'S TO TELL.....................OR I'LL BET ROCKY D HAS SOME GOOD STORIES TO TALK ABOUT........... YOU CAN HAVE A GREAT DEAL OF FUN WITH THIS AND IT WILL BE EDUCATIONAL AS WELL..............................JUST CURIOUS WHY DID YOU PICK A WELD"ER" PERSON TO WRITE ABOUT........ROCK

              [email protected]

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              • #8
                Maybe all the Proctologist's were busy
                It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                • #9
                  your stories will contribute

                  Opps, this entire process of using a message board is as new to me as welding, so I think half of this accidentally went out before I finished. Thanks for all the quick responses. They've already helped. I find there's something magical in fire and metal, and so the idea of creating a main character who is a weldor (thanks for the correction) has long intrigued me. I hope to take a class so I can get first hand experience, but I also wanted to hear the words of those of you who've done this for a long time. Keep talking.
                  jab

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                  • #10
                    JAB..... ENJOY SOME OF THE STORIES ON THIS AND THE OLD BOARD.............SURF AROUND MAN THEIR ARE SOME REAL CHARACTERS ON HERE...........................HAVE SOME FUN WITH IT ...........I SURE DO...............ROCK [email protected]

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                    • #11
                      Jab,

                      There's just something about a hot summer day (maybe in the nineties), hovering over a several thousand degree arc with your leather gear and a helmet on. The sweat is running off your face, and dripping all over the inside of the helmet. You can't see a darn thing, because your eyes are burning like two p*ss holes in the snow. Yet, somehow you keep the arc going just to get the job done. The end of the day you walk in the house, and the old lady won't come near you because you stink of welding smoke and you're black from head to toe. But still, we go back for more because there is that sense of accomplishment so often spoken of.

                      BTW, if this stuff shows up in your book, do we get a part of the sales? It's probably better money than what we're making now!
                      Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
                      The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

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                      • #12
                        ARBO........YOUR JUST TRYING TO FEED YOUR JUNK YARD DOG FOR FREE............QUIT THAT OR WE WON'T EVEN GET REFERENCED INTO THE BOOK............HAHAHAHAHA..............WOULDN'T THAT BE SOMETHING.......................ALL OF US IN A BOOK.........HAHAHA.... BE SAFE OUT THERE MAN...........90 DEGREES MAN DON'T YOU CARRY AN UMBRELLA......NOT THE ONES FOR RAIN THEIR NYLON THE ONES THE OLD FARMERS HAD ON THEIR FARMALL TRACTORS......HAHAHA.......................STAY COOL...............ROCK
                        [email protected]

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                        • #13
                          Jab, one of the most frustrating things about welding is the lack of concern about inferior welds. That is until there is a failure. I have seen so many sub-standard welds that I have become quite cynical when it comes to other welders, by the way, AWS A3.0:2001 STANDARD WELDING TERMS AND DEFINITIONS describes "weldor" as a sub-standard term for "welder". There have been discussions to change the official definitions, but nothing has been done yet.
                          I require all applicants to my company to bring a hood to the job interview and the first thing is to set up the machine and make your best attempt. I have had men come in and claim to be an expert aluminum tig welder. Yet when asked to set up the Lincoln 275 square wave (a very, very simple machine) they cannot. There are alot of horror stories out there, but there are many more successes. Welding is a spectacular way to earn a very good living if you take the time to learn to do it right. If you are ever in my part of the country, you are welcome to visit me in person and spend the day watching what we do. You can probably find any number of local companies to let you tag along. I strongly suggest you spend about a week with atleast three different companies. This will give you a well rounded look at the business and how things are done.
                          Respectfully,
                          Mike Sherman
                          Shermans Welding

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                          • #14
                            One other thing that occurred to me, it may be a little before your time but in the early eighties a movie came out called "Flashdance" the star was a welder, and not a bad looking one at that.
                            Respectfully,
                            Mike Sherman
                            Shermans Welding

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mike Sherman
                              One other thing that occurred to me, it may be a little before your time but in the early eighties a movie came out called "Flashdance" the star was a welder, and not a bad looking one at that.
                              I saw that movie...was he a welder or a weldor?
                              Last edited by Rocky D; 01-07-2003, 09:20 PM.

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