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Non welder circuit GFI trips?

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  • Non welder circuit GFI trips?

    With my Syncrowave 180, when I work the pedal to set the gas flow without even starting an arc, the GFI circuit on the wall nearby, (not what the welder is using) trips. Any ideas?

  • #2
    WAG You are using high frequency mode which is transmitting radio wave from welding leads and recieved by wires protected by GFI. GFI measures current balance between hot and neutral wires and trips if difference of a few milliamps. Can try grounding welder or shielding recieving wires. Maybe you have grinder extension cord or 110V wires in wall running parallel close to welding leads. A little distance might solve problems.

    If only happening when not welding your grinder lead is crossing welding lead and picking up HF leak. HF is also high voltage which is hard to contain perfectly as anyone who grabs spark plug wires with wet hands knows. If high voltage HF can't follow normal path because of open circuit welding leads (not welding) it will find another way.
    Last edited by Roger; 12-31-2002, 01:00 PM.

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    • #3
      Thanks for responding, Roger. It trips it all the time. I do have a fan plugged in the circuit withthe gfi, and the wire is running parallel to my work bench. I'll try unplugging it, and also grounding the power supply and work bench.

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      • #4
        Culprit revealed

        It was the am/fm stereo receiver!

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        • #5
          When I plug trusty old drill into GFI protected outlet which then trips, always check if wife has hair dryer or radio plugged into same circuit and setting on wet bathroom counter. I have 2 outside outlets and 3 bathroom outlets all on same GFI. I must get around to putting GFI at each outlet for less problems. Long extenion cords or romex pluged ito GFI can cause it to trip by it self (500ft +).

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          • #6
            HF woes...

            Along this same line.....The remote key switch for my car got wiped out because I had my car keys in my pocket when I accidently stepped on the foot pedal of my Syncrowave 300, as I had the torch cable laying over my leg.

            Beware of anything operating with a chip near the HF.

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            • #7
              Re: HF woes...

              Originally posted by Rocky D
              Along this same line.....The remote key switch for my car got wiped out because I had my car keys in my pocket when I accidently stepped on the foot pedal of my Syncrowave 300, as I had the torch cable laying over my leg.

              Beware of anything operating with a chip near the HF.

              Rocky D,do you mean like a pacemaker?Scary!

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              • #8
                Not only a tig welder, but a plasma machine produces HF to start the arc. I ruined several electronic cards in a welder on three different occasions before I figured out what was happening. Thanks goodness for the 3 yr warrenty.
                D. Paulson

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                • #9
                  Roger,

                  You don't need to put a GFCI on each outlet as long as they are on the same circuit breaker in your main panel. All you need to do is put a GFCI at the first outlet in the circuit. Wire it to the line side and all other outlets downstream on the load side. A GFCI protects itself and the load side.

                  That's why some of these guys' GFCI's trips when a large load isn't plugged into it.

                  Ryan

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                  • #10
                    Much shorter walk to reset local GFI. Makes trouble shooting of problem easy. Then even wife can then figure it out. With GFI at each protected outlet I don't trip wife's hairdryer with my drill or her hairdryer affect my outlet.

                    Long wire runs by itself even with sound insulation can have enough inductive or is it capasitance loss to trip a GFI.

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                    • #11
                      I agree with you on the easy troubleshooting part as long as your house is wired intelligently. My house is 55 years old and the previous owner didn't do some things logically at all.

                      I have one circuit which has a GFCI on it at the beginning of the circuit. We had X-mas lights plugged in outside on our deck 2 years ago (3 months after buying the house). We went to Ohio for New Years, returned and the lights were out. We also had porch lights, an outlet on the other side of the house, bathroom outlet, and deck lights that were all dead. I looked all over the place trying to find breaker that had tripped and couldn't, not knowing it had a GFCI on the circuit. I happened to be outside one day and saw a box there with a GFCI in it. Guess what, it was tripped. I went inside and everything started working again. Since then, it has tripped 1 time and I knew what it was right away.

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