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Flux Core Mig Process Questions

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  • Flux Core Mig Process Questions

    Hello,
    I recently purchased a Hobart Handler 190 unit.
    I have never used flux core wire for the MIG process.
    I have however stick welded many times, question: would one generally feel that FC Mig is an easier process (fir average oerson) to achieve decent welds with compared to Stick? Also, if one was to compair the process with stick, which electrode in Stick would the process be most similar to, 6010, 7018 etc ?
    Any suggestions for a beginner using Flux Core would be greatly appreciated, as well as the merits/disadvantages of the process in general. I believe this welder has a 3 grove feed roller accomidating .025, .030 and .035 size wire.
    Thanks!

  • #2
    I can't get to excited about Flux Core (FCAW) which is not actually consider MIG, After burning up demo roll of wire I went directly to MIG (Metal Inert Gas) or more proper GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Weld).... Fluxcore is a good general purpose concept that is good for many common types of steel... Shield Gas (GMAW) had about same proprieties as Fluxcore but has the feature of absolutely no flux that needs to be removed from weld and has a lot cleaner weld, which means you can go back over boo-boo with out having to chip flux off and it produces less splatter....

    Advantage of FCAW is some what better penetration and works well on less clean surfaces and works well in breezy conditions.. E71T-GS wire...

    Advantage of GMAW is very clean welds BUT requires cleaner preparation and not as good in breezy situations (where shield gas is blown away).... I use .030 ER70S6 for most of my general shop/backyard welds, but then I am amateur and do a lot of unknown or mild steels....

    You need to explore both concepts before getting to entrenched in just one type...

    And yes I use Flux Core when forced into it......

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale M.; 03-12-2018, 12:07 PM.
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      I do a lot of flux-core welding, as much as I like MIG. I'm just so often wanting to get something welded quickly and back into service without bringing it into shop conditions and as clean as MIG would like.

      In a production setting, in the shop, MIG can't be beat.

      Just grab some name-brand flux-cored wire and get at it. Within the spool, you'll know all you need.
      Last edited by MAC702; 03-21-2018, 03:17 PM. Reason: typo

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      • #4
        Thanks everyone, yes Dale you are correct that Flux Core is actually called FCAW, I have read of people using shielding gas with flux core wire too, why, not sure, and this isn’t what I was talking of anyway. Thanks for your input on FCAW (FLUX CORE ARC WELDING), however still wondering what stick electrode the FCAW would mimic the closest, and if most would find FCAW easier to lay nice looking beads with vs Stick? I guess I will just have to wait and figure this out myself. Just curious, that’s all.

        Thanks

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Repairtech4u View Post
          Thanks everyone, yes Dale you are correct that Flux Core is actually called FCAW, I have read of people using shielding gas with flux core wire too, why, not sure, and this isn’t what I was talking of anyway. Thanks for your input on FCAW (FLUX CORE ARC WELDING), however still wondering what stick electrode the FCAW would mimic the closest, and if most would find FCAW easier to lay nice looking beads with vs Stick? I guess I will just have to wait and figure this out myself. Just curious, that’s all.

          Thanks
          FCAW-S is a branch of welding processes, and therefore, does not "mimic" any particular electrode. Instead, like stick electrodes in SMAW, the arc character, penetration, etc. depends on the alloy and flux combination of the FCAW-S electrode wires you choose. Dale mentions one common electrode used in GMAW, but there are many. Same in FCAW-S and -G.

          Most would find it easier to use FCAW-S or -G because stick ( SMAW) requires the extra hand-eye coordination to control arc length and maintain a supply of filler metal, much of which is done by the welder in flux-core. Also, more manipulation of the rod is also required in SMAW.

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          • #6
            Sorry I missed this post earlier. The first thing a stick weldor will notice is what appears to be less penetration. I say "appears" to be less. The tensile strength of FCAW is the same as 7018. I mainly use it for welding anything in the field and galvanized. I do a lot of galv and it doesn't poop on you and spit molten steel all over you. Asin stick, " When there's slag...you drag"
            Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
            Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
            IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
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