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  • Drawing

    I've got a question. Is there a way to divide a line into equal parts without guessing but instead using a compas & triangle. I know how to divide it ino 8 equal parts but I can't figure out how to divide a line into 6 equal parts after I bisect the line.
    Thanks for your help, Chris

  • #2
    Chris, you are starting out by bisecting in the middle (I assume from your post). Therein lies your problem. Take your total distance and divide it by the total number of spaces desired, this will give you the space of each section in decimals. Turn the decimal into a fraction and there you are. Example: 7" divided by 6 spaces = 1.167 which is roughly 1-11/64". Make sense? Now as to using a compass and a triangle I will have to think about that one. Is this a test or do you have the option of using a calculator and a ruler?
    Respectfully,
    Mike Sherman
    Shermans Welding

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    • #3
      Re: Drawing

      Originally posted by Chris
      I know how to divide it ino 8 equal parts but I can't figure out how to divide a line into 6 equal parts after I bisect the line.
      Thanks for your help, Chris
      I don't understand. The process would be the same for 6 spaces as it would br for 8 spaces. Like Mike said, divide the total distance by the number of spaces. This will give you the size of each space. Weldors use this formula a lot. Like building fences, gates, structures with multiple vertical members in them. You can buy a calculator that deals in inches and feet. I'd be lost without mine.

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      • #4
        To divide a line of unknown length into six equal segments with a compass and a triangle:

        With the compass, draw an arc with center being one end of the line and the pencil on the other end. Bring the arc up to 90 degrees or so.

        Repeat from the other end of the line.

        Draw a line from the endpoint of the line, up to the intersection of the two arcs, and back down to the other end of the line.

        You have just created an equilateral triangle. Each angle is 60 degrees.

        You can now use your triangle to split the top angle into six 10 degree angles which can be projected back onto your original line to divide it into six parts...

        Is this what you were looking for?

        Bill C
        Bill C
        "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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        • #5
          Sorry... My previous answer was based on a protractor. It can be done with just a square and a compass...

          Starting with the equilateral triangle from my previous post...

          Draw a line from the top vertex bisecting the base.

          Draw line from the right bottom point through the midpoint of the vertical line until it intersects the left leg then back down vertically to the base line. This point is one-third of the length of the base line from the left bottom point.

          Repeat the previous step from the left bottom point through the midpoint of the vertical line to the right leg and back down to the base line.

          The base line is now divided into thirds... Bisect these lines and you have sixths....

          Got it???
          Bill C
          "The more I learn about welding the more I find there is to learn..."

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          • #6
            one way to bisect a line equally into any amount of parts is as follows:

            Imagine a line, say 12" long. take a two or three foot rule (or tape) and place one end intersecting at the beginning of the 12" long line and then pivot the angle of the two or three foot rule up until you have divided the line into 13, 14, or ad infinitum parts. try it first with a pencil, a drawing triangle, and a rule on your desk. it works the same in the shop, just use larger measuring tools...

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            • #7
              Thanks guys! I was amazed by all the different ways to trisect a line. Sherman, I know for sure that it will be on a test sometime this semester. Thanks again for solving my problem. This is a great forum with a lot of nice people. Also, some one told me to look on this page in the internet. Check it out, I think all of you will like it. when you get to that site push play underneath each line. Chris http://www41.homepage.villanova.edu/...ing%20segment/
              Last edited by Chris; 09-06-2002, 11:21 AM.

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              • #8
                Interesting web site Chris, it takes me back (way back) to my school days. As you can see by one or two other answers you received, there are some people who have alot more use in their dailey lives for this. I have not had the need to use geometry, except for rare occasions since high school. I hope we have answered your questions satisfactorily.
                Respectfully,
                Mike Sherman
                Shermans Welding

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                • #9
                  Hello Chris, what is you are making that you would need to do it that way? Like said before a gate, fence or any thing else that needs equal spacing just measue the insideof the frame plus the picket size x 2 and devide by your spacing I start out at 4.75 .

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                  • #10
                    I'm not making anything right now , just trying to get through this semester of layout and fab at my local community college. I know that I could find an easier way out in the field but in the classroom my curiosity took over. Thanks again
                    Chris

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