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  • Trouble with ten gauge tubing

    Hi, my name is Tim Rockers and I am a sophomore in high school. I am making cattle pannels that are 5' tall and 10' long and have come to a problem. I am using 1'' round tubing that is 1/8'' thick. I had another kid cut my peices and have found that most of the ten footers are an 1/8 inch to short after I flatten the ends a little. I am using a DC welder on reverse polaraty with 6013 1/8 rods. The welder is set at about 60 amps and I am welding a T-joint, the verticle five footers to the horizontal ten footers. The pannels are laying on saw horses and are in a easy position to weld.

    My problem is that I will get two thirds of the way throgh the weld and the metal gets to hot and I burn through. I am trying to weave across the gap and the weld looks good up until the last 1/4'' when I burn through or my puddle will fall down in the gap a little bit and it traps slag when it does. My dad has told me to try a 3/32 rod but we don't have any at school or home. I am set at around 65 amps and I don't think I cann't set my welder much lower, but I have tried making multiple welds to fill the gap that seemes to work the best but takes three times as long. The tubing that does butt up snug is easy to weld and my welds look great, its just when I try to weave over the gap, bad thing happen.

    I know I have multiple problems with multiple options I am just looking for the easiest and/or more logical idea's. I thank anyone that responds.
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  • #2
    Re: Trouble with ten gauge tubing

    Originally posted by Tim R.
    Hi, my name is Tim Rockers and I am a sophomore in high school. I am making cattle pannels that are 5' tall and 10' long and have come to a problem. I am using 1'' round tubing that is 1/8'' thick. I had another kid cut my peices and have found that most of the ten footers are an 1/8 inch to short after I flatten the ends a little. I am using a DC welder on reverse polaraty with 6013 1/8 rods. The welder is set at about 60 amps and I am welding a T-joint, the verticle five footers to the horizontal ten footers. The pannels are laying on saw horses and are in a easy position to weld.

    My problem is that I will get two thirds of the way throgh the weld and the metal gets to hot and I burn through. I am trying to weave across the gap and the weld looks good up until the last 1/4'' when I burn through or my puddle will fall down in the gap a little bit and it traps slag when it does. My dad has told me to try a 3/32 rod but we don't have any at school or home. I am set at around 65 amps and I don't think I cann't set my welder much lower, but I have tried making multiple welds to fill the gap that seemes to work the best but takes three times as long. The tubing that does butt up snug is easy to weld and my welds look great, its just when I try to weave over the gap, bad thing happen.

    I know I have multiple problems with multiple options I am just looking for the easiest and/or more logical idea's. I thank anyone that responds.
    It sounds like you are trying to fill the gap in one pass, which results in going too slow causing too much of a heat build up and burn-through...try to butter , or weld the pole side to reduce the gap and follow with a cover pass, this will enable you to keep your travel speed up and prevent the burn-through. You can do this with your 1/8" rod. If you see it getting too hot, break the arc and let it cool...don't try to rush it.

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    • #3
      Re: Trouble with ten gauge tubing

      Originally posted by Tim R.
      Hi, my name is Tim Rockers and I am a sophomore in high school. I am making cattle pannels that are 5' tall and 10' long and have come to a problem. I am using 1'' round tubing that is 1/8'' thick. I had another kid cut my peices and have found that most of the ten footers are an 1/8 inch to short after I flatten the ends a little. I am using a DC welder on reverse polaraty with 6013 1/8 rods. The welder is set at about 60 amps and I am welding a T-joint, the verticle five footers to the horizontal ten footers. The pannels are laying on saw horses and are in a easy position to weld.

      My problem is that I will get two thirds of the way throgh the weld and the metal gets to hot and I burn through. I am trying to weave across the gap and the weld looks good up until the last 1/4'' when I burn through or my puddle will fall down in the gap a little bit and it traps slag when it does. My dad has told me to try a 3/32 rod but we don't have any at school or home. I am set at around 65 amps and I don't think I cann't set my welder much lower, but I have tried making multiple welds to fill the gap that seemes to work the best but takes three times as long. The tubing that does butt up snug is easy to weld and my welds look great, its just when I try to weave over the gap, bad thing happen.

      I know I have multiple problems with multiple options I am just looking for the easiest and/or more logical idea's. I thank anyone that responds.
      You might try 7014, pretty good for filling gaps.
      ROCK

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