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  • #16
    Originally posted by Cronatron Rep
    http://webapp1.cronatronwelding.com/...temNum=CW01906

    This product has a lot less smoke and all you have to do is wire brush it clean after cutting/gouging to prep it for welding. They will work on Mild Steel, Stainless steel, Monel®, Cast Iron and Aluminum. Run them on AC or DC straight around 190 to 200 amps.
    I am thoroughly familiar with using Certanium 100 cuttrode....it produced tons of smoke, but cuts just as you describe....they have their place in the work force, alright. You mention yours has less smoke...do you have a video of your product in action? My application was in industrial maintenance, where I came across lots of different jobs. I can remember that when I would fire one of these babies up, it would clear the building due to the smoke...I had a blast using it.
    I agree with you as to less noise, no additional equipment to run it, and the gouge had little clean up, and doesn't load the groove with carbon. That's cool.

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    • #17
      I have a short video of the 1100 in action

      that I can email you, but it doesn't show alot.

      I haven't figured out how to up load these large files here, but let's try this

      http://www.filefactory.com/?f151bb
      Last edited by Cronatron Rep; 07-04-2006, 10:02 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Cronatron Rep
        that I can email you, but it doesn't show alot.

        I haven't figured out how to up load these large files here, but let's try this

        http://www.filefactory.com/?f151bb
        Thank you, friend....it looks like a good product. Does it come in different sizes? The Certanium 100 rods I used were 5/32" and did very well in gouging out inconel 600 castings.

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        • #19
          it comes in 5 different sizes

          3/32", 1/8", 5/32", 3/16" and 1/4"

          We also have a combo pack and to tell you the truth, I'm not sure what is in it. But I can find out.

          What amperage did you have to run "our" Certanium 100 on ? The 1/8" and 5/32" in the cronacut 1100 will run around 180 to 200 amps.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by jason
            Ian, I'd like to add that there is a process called carbon arc gouging. A stick welding power source is used with a carbon "straw" as the electrode, the arc creates the heat to melt the metal and compressed air is blown through the carbon to blow away the molten metal.

            I have also seen cutting electrodes at the store, but I don't know much about them.

            Jason

            That's an oxygen lance (or slice torch), arc gouging uses a solid carbon rod with a conductive copper coating, the air is blown through the carbon arc torch to blow away the slag and keep the torch cool.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Cronatron Rep
              3/32", 1/8", 5/32", 3/16" and 1/4"

              We also have a combo pack and to tell you the truth, I'm not sure what is in it. But I can find out.

              What amperage did you have to run "our" Certanium 100 on ? The 1/8" and 5/32" in the cronacut 1100 will run around 180 to 200 amps.
              I didn't realize Cronatron had the Certanium line of electrodes....small world....I consider them the "Cadillac" of electrodes...there's none better for industrial work. 89 for cast iron, 707 and 705 for general stuff...I remember welding a hydraulic line with the oil coming through the crack with that stuff...amazing! And the 100...I ran it around 250 -300 amps as I recall....I punched a hole through 2" steel, one time, just to see if it would go through...it did, and filled the shop with thick smoke.... Glad I wasn't paying the light bill!

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              • #22
                Certanium Alloys

                Cronatron Purchased Certanium in 2001. The number one company in Maintenance welding purchased the # 2 company, this was a great move by my company because there is a number of die-hard Certanium customers in the US and Canada. We now have 2 products in every class to offer.

                Here's the comparison for the 3 products you mentioned.

                Certanium 889 cast (84,000 psi tensile) / Cronatron 211 (84,000 psi tensile)
                Certanium 705 (130 psi tensile) / Cronatron 375 (175 psi tensile)
                Certanium 707 (120 psi tensile) / Cronatron 333 (125 psi tensile)

                Glad you like our products, not many folks here give them a chance due to our selling practices of not listing the pricing on line or in our catalogs.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Gouging

                  I Use to have a connecting rod to braze,every august,,,never in dec, but they were 18" thick,,so there was alot of veing out,,I always used 7024,cranked to the max 400 amps,and did a nicer job as if tou were hand grinding,I have to dig out my pre heater,a 50 gal tank of kerosine,and compress air,,heat up the end,and light it,I would come in at 4 am to preheat,,and 2 of us would start brazing at 6 am,,and finish about 6 pm,always the hotest days But The cust needed it,,and the money was good,probaby pour in 35 to 40 # of brass,,,and never had on failed,and best diet you could use
                  Got to dig the heater out,,was loader than a 747,,Home made in the 20's- or 30's,But did the Job,,woke up the entire neiborhood,as the sound would echo out the front door,,Clean it up,after packing to cooldown,and pray you didnt hear the crack!!!!!!!!never did,,and then waited 90 days to get paid, Jack

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mike W
                    Cutting with a stick rod is fine if you don't mind it looking like it was chewed in half by a beaver. I did that years ago before I got my oxy/act rig. You do what you can until you have the right tools.
                    ROFL!!!
                    MM251 w/ Spoolmatic - SOLD
                    Sp135 (Weldpack 3200 HD)
                    Cheapo Ebay O/A Setup
                    Propane with weed burner for metal pre-heat
                    Shenzen TIG - 200 AC/DC Pulse

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      this post is dated, for sure. but i've cut with 6011 with good results with my old dc machine.
                      also, i am a huge fan of the certanium 702 and 707 electrodes. easy strike and re strike. excelent storage characteristic rods that don't absorb moisture.
                      Lincoln Idealarc 250
                      Miller Bobcat 250
                      Thermal arc Hefty 2 feeder
                      Thermal Dynamics Cusmaster 52
                      Torchmate CNC Table

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Worked in steel mill about 9 months, learned alot. Oxygen lance in operation was as follows, Take a wooden match light it and place on a peice of thin pallet wood, lightly turn on O2 flowing from 10" stick of 1/8" plain old pipe. O2 will get pallet wood burning quickly, place a small(1-2" peice of coal on burning wood play O2 on it. Coal will burn, then heat up end of pipe, will have sputtering type of burning, place against a peice of steel and let it heat steel up, then turn up O2 flow to what is needed. Took as long to type as to do it.

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                        • #27
                          *scratching my head*

                          You didn't say what equipment you had to work with, or what you are cutting, but i am unsure why on earth you would want to use an arc machine to cut with if you have anything else available. Yes, you can cut with an arc machine, but the description a couple of replys ago about being chewed in half by a beaver is a pretty good description. Just use your torch! You'll be much happier with the results.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Cronatron Rep View Post
                            Cronatron Purchased Certanium in 2001. The number one company in Maintenance welding purchased the # 2 company, this was a great move by my company because there is a number of die-hard Certanium customers in the US and Canada. We now have 2 products in every class to offer.

                            Here's the comparison for the 3 products you mentioned.

                            Certanium 889 cast (84,000 psi tensile) / Cronatron 211 (84,000 psi tensile)
                            Certanium 705 (130 psi tensile) / Cronatron 375 (175 psi tensile)
                            Certanium 707 (120 psi tensile) / Cronatron 333 (125 psi tensile)

                            Glad you like our products, not many folks here give them a chance due to our selling practices of not listing the pricing on line or in our catalogs.
                            Those three rods are my all-time favorites...they also make a cuttrode Certanium 100 that cuts and gouges, like a dream...we called it "smoke rod"...I could fill the building with smoke in 5 minutes.
                            Originally posted by mcostello View Post
                            Worked in steel mill about 9 months, learned alot. Oxygen lance in operation was as follows, Take a wooden match light it and place on a piece of thin pallet wood, lightly turn on O2 flowing from 10" stick of 1/8" plain old pipe. O2 will get pallet wood burning quickly, place a small(1-2" piece of coal on burning wood play O2 on it. Coal will burn, then heat up end of pipe, will have sputtering type of burning, place against a piece of steel and let it heat steel up, then turn up O2 flow to what is needed. Took as long to type as to do it.
                            The oxy lance I used was to remove a man-hole iron casting from the surrounding concrete...they were 5 feet long to keep you away from the exploding concrete....worked like a charm.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I haven't done this in a while so it may be outdated. A huge amount of my work was field welding. I used a plain old A/O cutting torch in the field for every thing it would cut, cutting tip for regular cuts, scarfing tip for washing off welds.An Arc Air rig makes A/O look premitive for washing off welds but you need a compressor. The only time I used arc cutting, actually melting and blowing metal off with the arc force was on cast iron. I tried using arc gouging or "chamfer" rods but found plain ol' 6010 ( 5P, +P, HYP) would out perform them at less cost. Switch your polarity, turn the machine UP, make your cut on the bottom so gravity helps in removing the molten metal and wash it out. I used this strictly to remove cast iron parts, sheaves,etc. that couldn't be cut conventionally and that wouldn't come off any other way as it is junk when you get done.

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                              • #30
                                Switch polarity? You mean electrode negative? Why? Thanks for the info.

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