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  • Metal dripping

    Hi guys,
    I haven't had success in doing a vertical up weld yet, after the nozzle gets out of the way so I can see the results, gravity has pulled away the metal into a drip before freezing. I'm more successful at vertical down welds, I guess because its easier to see what is going on.

    I finished the main work on my welding cart, and my angle grinder was needed more than once to make it look decent. I'll post some pictures in a couple of days to show my carts functionallity.

    Any suggestions?
    .030 steel, HH175 on #3 setting, 20ipm speed, 25%CO, 1/8 * 1 inch angle.
    It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

  • #2
    Al,

    I used to have the same problem. (and still do sometimes)

    I try to keep the tip pointed upward and slightly in under the puddle. It seems that the forward motion of the wire helps to keep the puddle from dripping away. As you mention, vertical down is easier. I still try to keep the gun in the same position, for the same reason. Down will not give as good penetration, but will be a smoother, flatter bead. Good luck.
    Last edited by Arbo; 11-04-2002, 01:45 PM.
    Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
    The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

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    • #3
      Thanks Arbo,
      I'll keep practicing, its like learning how the write all over again.
      It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Metal dripping

        Originally posted by Al T.
        Hi guys,
        I haven't had success in doing a vertical up weld yet, after the nozzle gets out of the way so I can see the results, gravity has pulled away the metal into a drip before freezing. I'm more successful at vertical down welds, I guess because its easier to see what is going on.

        I finished the main work on my welding cart, and my angle grinder was needed more than once to make it look decent. I'll post some pictures in a couple of days to show my carts functionallity.

        Any suggestions?
        .030 steel, HH175 on #3 setting, 20ipm speed, 25%CO, 1/8 * 1 inch angle.
        Al T

        First of all, there should be no need to weld out of position on a welding cart for a HH 175. You should be able to reposition the cart so that you welds are occuring in a flat position. Ok , so most of your fillets will actually be in the horizontal position. I ve seen quite a few novice weldors (guys I work with) actually not stop and think about the fact the project is actually small enough to reposition, and they start welding quite a few joints out of position when it isn t needed. Finally though, except for one pig headed guy, they have caught on and reposition there work.

        Now to address your vertical weld problem. First of all, most times it is ok to weld vertical down on 1/8" material. However, I am not a fan of welding down hill unless the material is thin ga sheet metal. So the first thing I would try would be dropping the voltage down to selection #2, which will make your weld puddle less fluid and easier to control. Of course this should require an increase in the wire speed, because of how the HH 175 is designed. Maybe some where between 30 and 40. Like Arbo stated drop the gun angle. Drop it about 10 to 15 degrees off 90 degrees from you work peice. So for vertical up you want to be pushing the weld puddle. In the vertical position the direction of travel is reversed for the increasing or decreasing of weld bead penetration. For example, Pulling the weld will be vertical down which results in shallower penetration, because your off to the races against good old gravity. Now you aren t going to able to just travel straight up without some type of oscillation. I don t like just a side to side motion because this going to make it difficult to guarantee good fusion to the root of the weld. Plus, it has a tendency to make the weld bead a little fat (pile) in the center of the weld. Im posting two suggested oscillations to try. The examples don t show it but the start of both should be a side to side motion so that you create a shelf for the weld puddle. Also, the end of the weld bead should have a side to side motion on it to fill in the crater at the end. Im not recommending one over the other give them both a try and see what you think.
        Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 09:16 AM.
        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


        PM 180C



        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

        Comment


        • #5
          Suggestion # 2
          Last edited by Dan; 05-01-2009, 09:16 AM.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

          Comment


          • #6
            Dan,

            Your second post with the round oscillation is my method of choice. It is obvious that you have had alot more training in this than I. I pretty much taught myself over the years, and asked alot of questions along the way. Thanks for helping out with those drawings.

            Arbo
            Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)
            The Next Loud Noise You Hear Is Me!

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            • #7
              This is my favorite stroke...

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              • #8
                Great suggestions, I'll try them all.

                Dan,
                Your right about the out of position welding, there was no need to do vertical. I should have taken a moment and repositioned. Hopefully I'll remember to change my habits.

                My welding cart design is a bit unusual, compared to the norm. Being disabled, I needed to have all my tools, welder, supplies, clamps, jigs, two tanks, apron and helmuts in a single cart. Options include 4 shelves, 1 shelf slides left and right so its easy to reach back items, a front sliding table that has holders and space for hand tools, holes for torch, no-stick paste, magnetic catch for wire snips so they don't fall on the floor giving my scooters flats and cable hanger. I also mounted a adjustable magnetic spot light that I got from Lowes made by Delta.

                I'll take some pictures tonight if you all want to see it.

                Thanks again for all your advice.
                It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                • #9
                  Sounds awsome! Looking forward to the Pics.
                  Duke

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                  • #10
                    Al T, I'd like to see the pictures. Sounds like a really nice table with a lot of thought put into it.

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                    • #11
                      Welding Cart with an attitude,

                      My design was influenced by my need to sit down while I am welding. I needed lots of space and room to add additional hangers and shelves as the need adrises and room to change later on. It is made from 1" by 1/8 inch angle iron and wheels are 3-inch swivels (4 inch would be better).

                      The Mig cable is delicate and needed a hanger that would not kink it and is held at the correct level so as not to drag on the floor and be as light to hold as possible. The HH175 is recessed back about 6 inches so if the cart gets pushed against a wall it will not kink the cable. There is also enough room to add a 180SD if Santa is good to me.

                      The front pull out table was needed for hand tools that would normally clog up my work area. Torch holder and magnetic catch for wire snips that usually wind in my tires and room for any changes later.

                      The center pullout shelf which I will add sides to later, holds short and skinny items while the fixed bottom shelf for heavier taller items.

                      The top shelf, which might acquire sides, is for storage and future use

                      Two tanks in the back, 25%CO and 100% Argon 60 CF are held with chains, I will add two more chains in a couple of days. The gauge is easily viewed for flow from the front of the cart.

                      Just to keep things inexpensive and strong I used Rebarb for rear and front hangers, they are for work cable, leather apron and 2 helmets. On the 2 front hangers I keep a couple of C clamps and a couple of 90-degree jigs for doing inside and outside welds on various materials. I got the idea from you guys in an earlier email. They are great tools to have.

                      I added a small tool rack on the front top to be storage for other hand tools.
                      It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                      • #12
                        Cylinder placement.
                        It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                        • #13
                          Left side.
                          It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                          • #14
                            Right side.
                            It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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                            • #15
                              90 degree jig.
                              It's not an optical illusion...it just looks like one

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