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  • Chris
    replied
    In my opinion if you are really wanting a cheaper way of cutting tubing (thinwall) a 4 1/2" angle grinder is a great tool to have. I have 2 from "Chuck the truck man" (not much power and one burned out fairly quick) 1 from Harbor Freight which seeems to work pretty good for 19.00 and one made by Porter Cable. I got it for 69.00 and I feel like I really got my moneys worth in that tool. Just take your time and be sure to wear gloves and tuck your shirt tail in because they can bite hard.
    I naver used a circular saw to cut metal but that sounds like a good idea.
    Chris
    Last edited by Chris; 11-21-2002, 01:04 AM.

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  • Ken O
    replied
    >>Will that quick change gizmo fit any grinder?? I see it's only >>$19.99.

    The shaft on a Matebo has a slot on each side, the nut is larger OD with a knerred edge, and on the back of the nut there is a spring steel washer with two "ears" that fit down the slots in the shaft. So... to make this work on your Hilti, you could trim the ears off the washer, I have seen this done, but dont know what the safety/liabilty factor woud be.


    >>With a little saw jig setup you could cut that square tubing in >>about 15 minutes, with the Evolution.

    Thats what I was thinking, maybe putting it in a table or cutoff saw. The pieces are only six inches long. I was also thinking of a band saw.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Ken O
    Hi Rocky D,
    The amp draw is 9, 8,500 RPM. These things are very powerful. The wheels for cutting are .040. Another thing nice is you dont need any tools to change wheels. You made me make a trip to the garage LOL. I tried to do a google search to find out with out getting off my butt. I stumbled on this URL... http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...401544-7963007
    it has an interesting review at the bottom of the page, although its for the 4 in grinder.

    On another note, I was kind of interested in the evolution because I was asked to cut a couple hunded small sqare tube pieces, and I was thinking of less dust and mess in my garage. I retired a few weeks ago, and moved to my log cabin in the woods. I built a good size garage here a few years ago, and about have it full with toys and tools, (I guess they are toys now also LOL). I made my welding table out of 5/8" plate, (its what the Metabo is laying on if you can see through the clutter). I made a burning cart, and am starting a cargo sled for my snowmobile to put my ice shanty and gear in for ice fishing. I got to pick up a bottle of argon tomorrow to tig the tubing together.
    Will that quick change gizmo fit any grinder?? I see it's only $19.99.

    With a little saw jig setup you could cut that square tubing in about 15 minutes, with the Evolution.

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  • Ken O
    replied
    Hi Rocky D,
    The amp draw is 9, 8,500 RPM. These things are very powerful. The wheels for cutting are .040. Another thing nice is you dont need any tools to change wheels. You made me make a trip to the garage LOL. I tried to do a google search to find out with out getting off my butt. I stumbled on this URL... http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...401544-7963007
    it has an interesting review at the bottom of the page, although its for the 4 in grinder.

    On another note, I was kind of interested in the evolution because I was asked to cut a couple hunded small sqare tube pieces, and I was thinking of less dust and mess in my garage. I retired a few weeks ago, and moved to my log cabin in the woods. I built a good size garage here a few years ago, and about have it full with toys and tools, (I guess they are toys now also LOL). I made my welding table out of 5/8" plate, (its what the Metabo is laying on if you can see through the clutter). I made a burning cart, and am starting a cargo sled for my snowmobile to put my ice shanty and gear in for ice fishing. I got to pick up a bottle of argon tomorrow to tig the tubing together.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Ken O
    As I have posted before, the 6" Metebo is way better for cutting and scrapping than any of the 4 or 5 inch grinders. Its the only brand I have seen on the sites in many years for cutting and scrapping. You will see many brands for grinding though. (Maybe no one else makes a 6") This grinder has a protector circuit that shuts it down if it overheats untill its cooled down, which is real handy if your are contiually scrapping or cutting for hours. Its still light enough it doesnt wear you out, although it is a little larger and heavier. They cost about $220, but as I have said before, check your pawn shops, I got one in almost new condition for $70.
    Whats nice about scrapping with this, is, when you get the bad out, you have a finished edge to weld the new back in. Of course if nothing is going back and you are demoing, the torch or lance is the way to go.
    Ken, what's the amp draw and the RPM of the Metabo 6" ?

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  • Ken O
    replied
    As I have posted before, the 6" Metebo is way better for cutting and scrapping than any of the 4 or 5 inch grinders. Its the only brand I have seen on the sites in many years for cutting and scrapping. You will see many brands for grinding though. (Maybe no one else makes a 6") This grinder has a protector circuit that shuts it down if it overheats untill its cooled down, which is real handy if your are contiually scrapping or cutting for hours. Its still light enough it doesnt wear you out, although it is a little larger and heavier. They cost about $220, but as I have said before, check your pawn shops, I got one in almost new condition for $70.
    Whats nice about scrapping with this, is, when you get the bad out, you have a finished edge to weld the new back in. Of course if nothing is going back and you are demoing, the torch or lance is the way to go.

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  • Bob
    replied
    Russell,

    Here is an alternate on the steel cutting carbide blades



    I chanced to find a pair of blades on ebay: $9 for two. At that price I had to try it. "Goldtol" brand name. Have not found anything by that name since.

    I did once have it catch and jump a little while cutting 1/8 x 1/2 strap too far from the vice. Otherwise works fine. I did some 3/8" by 2" today. That worked too.

    Bob

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by russell
    Rocky I seen your previous posts on this.I have a Dewalt 5" grinder,I would like to try those Hilti wheels you use.Do you use the flat or depressed centers wheels?
    Hilti and Evolution ain`t cheap. I bet you got a terrific shop.

    Thanks
    russell
    Yeah, I'm a believer that a craftsman is only as good as his tools.
    The work we do as weldors, is a very specialized craft. What we build is a monument to our craft, and can last 'forever'...(a relative term nowadays..) (911 being a classic example). I don't like to scrimp on tools.

    The wheels are flat with a special "nut" that is separate, to attach them to the arbor. The hole size is 5/8".

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    All this being said about metal cutting carbide circular saw blades, and I have an Evolution 180, I use a Hilti 5" grinder with a .040" abrasive cutting wheel on it to almost completely make my O/A torch obsolete. I get very accurate cuts...you can cut right on the scribe line easy..(and I'm all for EASY) It will cut fast, too. The 5" grinder turns 11,000RPM and the high speed makes the blades stiffer, for out of position cuts. Unlike a 4 1/2" grinder, the same blade on a that grinder tend to wear too fast and break more easily. I recommend a 5" grinder for all around grinding and cutting. There are several companies that make a 5" grinder that turn 11,000. Hilti prices, although top notch equipment, are cost prohibitive for the hobbyist.

    Forgive me, I know you've seen this picture before, but it helps illustrate.

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  • Bob
    replied
    Russell,

    Yup. Black and Decker Model 7301 (if that means anything). It is all metal body, rated at 9 amps, direct drive not worm gear. At least 20 years old, going strong.

    I was skeptical at first too. Thought I would need to build some sort of special fixture/guide thing to keep it under control. It is very much like cutting wood to my surprise. I start the cuts slowly to get alignment, but then it seems to settle in and cut like mad.

    Anyone joining late, this is a carbide blade made specifically for cutting metal, not a garden variety wood cutting carbide blade.

    It does make lots of hot chips ... down forward left and right. I wear my left hand welding glove, closed eye protection mask (I like to see) and ear muffs (a friend of mine is going deaf, no thank you).

    It does make chips (1/8 square +/-) as opposed to grit and filings. Easy to sweep up, but they do get all over and crunch underfoot.

    The Evolution saw body is unique in being closed to catch chips. The normal circular saw expells sawdust. With a blade of this type the normal saw also expells the chips. Seem like too much extra money for that modification over a regular circular saw.

    If anybody caught last months popular mechanics, there was a reprint of a add, circa 1957, for the B&D model U-3 hand held drill. I have one of those too.

    Bob

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  • BillC
    replied
    Haybine,

    I recommend the $59 Harbor Freight chopsaw if money is everything. I have been very happy with mine. I think the best bang for the buck is the $180 bandsaw.

    I tried several other options. I could never get the Sawzall to make straight cuts. The cutting wheel for my circular saw was OK but I didn't like all the grit and steel getting into my nice Milwaukee saw...

    Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ken O
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob


    Personally, I have two such blades for my 7 1/8 standard circular saw. I suit up with welding glove, eye and ear protection. That is a bit of a bother, but totally necessary. Have not seen a US maker of this type of blade, but seems like there sould be one.

    Bob

    Does this blade fit into a regular Skill saw? Or did you have to make some modifications. I'd like to try it out on some light stuff.
    Ken O

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  • Bob
    replied
    russell,

    I will second RockyD praise of the carbide steel cutting blade for the circular saw. My max cut so far is 2x2x1/4 angle ... and it just went right through it.

    Below is one seller of the "evolution 180" I found with a search on "evolution saw". 180mm is about 7.2".

    The Evolution Portable Steel Saws are without a doubt one of the greatest inventions in steel fabricating machinery that we have seen in the last 30 years.


    Personally, I have two such blades for my 7 1/8 standard circular saw. I suit up with welding glove, eye and ear protection. That is a bit of a bother, but totally necessary. Have not seen a US maker of this type of blade, but seems like there sould be one.

    Bob

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  • Blkvoodoo
    replied
    Hey Russel,

    out of curiosity, where is Bessemer City NC, in relation to Raleigh?

    never heard of it before .

    Just wondering.

    Kevin

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  • Ken O
    replied
    If I only had one thing to cut steel, it would be a 6" Matabo (which is a electric grinder) with a waffer wheel (1/16" thick grinding wheel), you can cut sheet metal, to the heaviest I-beams, with no clean up. They are kind of expensive, about $220, I picked one up at a pawn shop for $70. Maybe try e-bay, call around, and, you can also use it with regular grinding wheels, or wire wheels, to clean up welds etc.
    Of coarse a plasma would be great, but, lots of cash!

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